CHAPTER  CVII to CIX Part 1

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw - 24 April 1980

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 1980)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2019)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  of III (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

Book Vol. I of IV            ISBN: TBA                EBook Vol. I of IV

ISBN: 978-1-365-73794-7

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II of III

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III of III

(14 January 2010 to 31

December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

USS Coral Sea CV-42 CVB-43 CVA-43 and CV-43 History and Those Aircraft Carriers Operating with Coral Sea During Her Tour of Service CONSTRUCTION to LAUNCHING and EARLY JET AIRCRAFT DEVELOPMENT (10 July 1944—2 April 1946) and a Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

ISBN: 9781434382917

 

 

An overhead view of the flight decks of the aircraft carriers USS Independence (CV-62), top, and USS Midway (CV-41), bottom, moored beside each other, Naval Station Pearl Harbor, 23 August 1991. A great detailed photo, showing the various aircraft of their Air Wings. Midway was en route from Naval Station, Yokosuka, Japan, to Naval Air Station, North Island, California, where she would be decommissioned in the spring of 1992. Independence would travel to Yokosuka to take over as the Navy's only forward-based aircraft carrier. US Navy photo by PH2 Omar Hasan. (Available from DefenseImagery.mil as photo # DN-ST-9203042.) NS026252. Presented by Robert M. Cieri. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026252.jpg

 

CHAPTER  CVII to CIX Part 1

 

 

1992 USS Midway (CV-41) Final Annual Report

CHAPTER CVII

 

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY

USS MIDWAY (CV 41)

FPO AP 96631-2710

 

5720

Ser 11/

 

From:                 Commanding Officer, USS MIDWAY (CV 41)

 

To:                     Director of Naval History (OP-09BH)

 

Subj:                  1992 COMMAND HISTORY

 

Ref:                   (a) OPNAVINST 5720.12E

 

Encl:                  (1) USS MIDWAY (CV 41) Command History 1992

 

1.  Per reference (a), enclosure (1) is forwarded.

 

 

L. L. ERNST

USS MIDWAY (CV-41)

COMMAND HISTORY 1992

 

 

 

CAPTAIN LARRY L. ERNST, USN

COMMANDING

 

 

Encl (1)

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART   I            Command Composition and Organization

 

PART   II           Chronology

 

A.         Employment

 

B.          Operational Highlights

 

C.          Significant Events

 

PART   III

 

A.         Supply Department

 

B.          Production Department

 

C.          Security Department

 

D.         Deactivation Department

 

E.          Decommissioning Ceremony Department

 

F.          Support Department

 

PART   IV         Supporting Documents

 

A.         Commanding Officer's Biography

 

B.          Information Kit

 

C.          11 April 1992 Officer Roster

 

D.         Selected Plans of the Day

 

E.          Selected Press Releases

 

F.          Decommissioning Ceremony Invitation

 

G.         Decommissioning Ceremony Program

 

H.         Selected Photographs

 

PART I

 

COMMAND COMPOSITION AND ORGANIZATION

 

Captain L. L. ERNST, USN, ----/1310

             Commanding Officer, 1 January 1992 - 11 April 1992

 

Commander J. F. SCHORK, USN, ----/1320

             Executive Officer, 1 January 1992 – 11 April 1992

 

PART II

CHRONOLOGY

 

A.  EMPLOYMENT.  None

 

USS MIDWAY SCHEDULE – 1992

 

1 JAN 92 - 10 APR 92                          IN PORT SAN DIEGO (PRE-INACTIVATION)

 

11 APR 92                                               DECOMMISSIONED

 

B. OPERATIONAL HIGHLIGHTS.  None

 

C. SIGNIFICANT EVENTS

 

15 January        -            MIDWAY was awarded the Joint Military unit Award for participation  in Operation Fiery Vigil

31 January        -            Alpha section Close-out

28 February      -            MIDWAY was awarded the Kuwait Liberation Medal for participation in Operation Desert Storm

2 March            -            MIDWAY was voted as runner-up for COMNAVAIRPAC Battle "E" for 1991 with Operations, communications                                        and Damage Control Departments winning the Departmental Efficiency Awards

7 March            -            Last Official Dining Out for MIDWAY Wardroom

11 March          -            Charlie section Close-out

20 March          -            Bravo section Close-out

29 March          -            Last Hail & Farewell Party

31 March          -            Final Close-out of MIDWAY Spaces

3 April              -            Farewell Ball for MIDWAY

10 April            -            Reception for past MIDWAY Commanding Officers hosted by VADM Kohn (COMNAVAIRPAC)

11 April            -            Decommissioning Ceremony

 

PART III

 

NARRATIVE

 

A. SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. The function and structure of the Supply Department have dramatically changed during the decommissioning process. Since the beginning of the year, the only functional divisions remaining were:

 

S-l Division: Inventory Management Division; Stock Control, Financial and Procurement. Although “out of business” with regards to requisitioning inventory, S-l Division was still active in procuring emergency requirements, closing-out, and reconciling inventory records. The final reconciliation process will be accomplished by COMNAVAIRPAC.

 

S-4 Division: Disbursing; Payroll, Fiscal, Travel. The crew’s payroll account was handled by MIDWAY Disbursing Clerks until 28 Feb 92 and then transferred to the Personnel Support Detachment NAS North Island. The ship’s DKs continued to provide outstanding support on board through a satellite customer service office.

 

S-7 Division: Data Service Division; Data Entry, Library, and operations. Operating out of trailers equipped with data processing hardware, S-7 Division continues to update SUADPS records for inventory reconciliation. All microcomputers were collected and returned to COMNAVAIRPAC for redistribution.

 

S-8 Division: Material Division; Storage, Shipping and Receiving, and HAZMAT. No longer involved with stowing stock, S-8 Division moved over 5,000 pallets of off-load material to various DOP’s and other sites. Additionally, all HAZMAT and HAZWASTE was processed for proper disposition.

 

B. PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT. The calendar year 1992 has been an unusual year for MIDWAY. The normally active MIDWAY has sat idle at Naval Air station North Island's pier while undergoing the deactivation process. After doing very well during the INSURV in the fall of 1991, the Department of the Navy decided to mothball MIDWAY instead of sending this “Grand Old Lady” to the scrap yard.

 

(1) The deactivation process has been a true learning experience for all hands. The first major hurdle was the reorganization of almost all of the ship's personnel. All departments, with the exception of Supply and Admin, were disbanded and the huge Production Department was formed. Consisting of over 1,400 personnel, it was the biggest department that the ship ever had.

 

(2) Under the leadership of CDR Doyle Kitchin, the Production Department undertook a massive effort to close-out more than 2,400 spaces that comprise the MIDWAY.

 

(3) The Production Department was organized into 5 different areas. Alpha, Bravo, and Charlie split the ship into thirds from the second deck and below. Topside took all the spaces on the main deck and up to the top of the mast. The last section was Production Support, who was charged with providing all materials for the other sections.

 

(4) Alpha was tasked to close-out the forward third of the ship, second deck and below. This encompassed twelve magazines and eight pump rooms. In total, Alpha section closed-out more than two hundred spaces.

 

(5) What made Alpha unique was the fact that they finished all their original spaces on 31 January 1992. They were the first section to finish their original assigned spaces. They proved their motto of “Doing it Right, Doing it First.”

 

(6) Bravo section made fairly steady progress and closed-out on 20 March 1992. They were tasked with closing-out all the main spaces. This encompassed twelve fire rooms, four main engine rooms, three evaporators, and four generator rooms. In the end, they closed out over four hundred spaces.

 

(7) Closing-out the main spaces was a tough job. The first thing that Bravo did was open and clean the insides of the boilers. Then they placed all the boilers and engines on heated air lay-up. The DFTs were also opened and desiccant bags placed inside.

 

(8) Charlie section had a difficult task. Not only were they given over 300 spaces to close-out, but they couldn’t devote all their manpower to the deactivation effort. They were given the task of keeping the refrigerators, air conditioning plants, hotel steam system, fresh water supply, and aircraft elevators in operation.

 

(9) To accomplish this, Charlie split their men into two groups. The first group had the responsibility of carrying the whole close-out load. Averaging over 15 spaces a week, the 50 or so men shouldered the burden to make goal every week.

 

(10) The rest of Charlie section was devoted to the preventive and corrective maintenance of hotel services. They maintained both refrigerators until early December, three air conditioning plants until early March, dry cleaning plant until early February, hot water for bathing and hotel usage until early February, fresh water until mid-March, and the aircraft elevators were still in operation.

 

(11) The largest section was the Topside section.  Starting the deactivation process with 376 people, they eventually shrunk down to 128 at the time of the Decommissioning Ceremony. This large amount of men was needed to close-out over 1,000 spaces assigned from the second deck and up.

 

(12) Topside was also responsible for the complete preservation of the entire exterior of the ship, including the island structure and mast, flight deck, hangar bay, and exterior hull of the ship above the water line.

 

(13) Production Support had the hardest and most diverse job of all sections formed. They had control of all trouble calls, PMS on Damage Control equipment, cognizance over the removal of all electronic material, and responsibility to order all supplies necessary for the deactivation process.

 

(14) Support’s S-12 Division was comprised of the hard working electricians. During the deactivation process they completed over 10,000 megger checks on over 735 fuse boxes and 120 lighting and receptacle panels. However, their biggest job was electrically disconnecting all electrical equipment, except lighting, in all 2,400 spaces.              .

 

(15) Support’s S-13 Division was made up of the Interior Communications Electricians. It was their job to lay-up the 5MC and all duress alarms. At the same time, they had to devise and install a remote 1MC announcing system for the barge, as well as install the new phones on the barge and in the trailers. This enabled a smooth transition of all personnel and offices off the MIDWAY, enabling those spaces to be deactivated.

 

(16) Support’s S-14 Division had a very large job handed to them. It was their responsibility to lay-up, deactivate, or remove all the electronic equipment aboard the MIDWAY. Along the way they removed the two CIWS mounts, two BPDMS launchers, flight deck communications system (SRC-47), AN/WSC-3 LOS, AN/URT-23, NAVMACS, AN/USQ-69, TT-624, Flag Data Display System (FDDS), AN/SMQ-10 weather satellite antennae, and the AN/SPN-41 elevation and azimuth domes.

 

(17) ER09 was formed to take over all Damage Control PMS. The 25 personnel performed over 1,000 PMS checks. They were also assigned the task of coordinating the removal of all excess damage control gear to other ships, and the storage of left over gear in the ship’s magazines. The gear shall remain onboard until needed at some future date.

 

(18) The rest of Production Support was dedicated to the direct support of Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, and Topside in the deactivation effort. They ordered and stocked literally thousands of gallons of paint and lagging paste, as well as hundreds of paint brushes, rolls of lagging tape, key locks, surgical gloves, respirators, and seizing wire. If not for Production Support, all deactivation work would literally have grounded to a screeching halt.

 

(19) When all was said and done on 11 April 1992, the men of the MIDWAY had performed superbly. By closing-out more than 2,400 spaces, they had readied her to be towed to Bremerton, Washington where she will go into the mothball fleet to await perhaps another day to show the "MIDWAY Magic" when the opportunity arrives.

 

             C.  SECURITY DEPARTMENT. Since the new year began, the Security Department closed the ship's brig, moved its operation from the ship to the barge, and all but eliminated the Command Investigations Office. The urinalysis program remains unchanged as does the emphasis on security and maintaining good order and discipline.

 

In February, the Disbursing Office moved its office to the base and the Security Alert Team was dissolved to make more people available for other watches. All weapons and ammunition were turned in and the last of the records were shipped to the TYCOM and other holders. On 11 April 1992, the Security Department performed its final function as a department during the decommissioning ceremony of USS MIDWAY.

 

D. DEACTIVATION DEPARTMENT. The Deactivation staff was established for the deactivation process in order to provide the interface and liaison between MIDWAY’s own ship’s force and the various external agencies and civilian shipyard contractors supporting the decommissioning work.

 

(1) Deactivation provided 24 Quality Assurance inspectors trained in compartment close-out criteria and inspection techniques. These personnel inspected ship’s force work prior to compartments being presented to the Inactive Ship’s Maintenance Facility, Bremerton, for close-out acceptance.

 

(2) Additionally, the Deact Staff provided the Shipyard Coordinator an assistant who worked with SUPSHIP San Diego personnel and the civilian shipyard contractors.

 

(3) The Deactivation Staff ensured that over 2300 individual compartments were properly prepared and finally accepted by INACTSHIPS and that the efforts of all four major civilian contractors were coordinated and integrated with each other and with ship's force.

 

E. DECOMMISSIONING CEREMONY COORDINATOR DEPARTMENT. The Decom Ceremony Coordinator Department was formed on 27 September 1991.

 

(1) Decommissioning Coordinator was responsible for the coordination of USS MIDWAY’s Decommissioning Ceremony. Decom Staff was responsible for compiling and mailing of over 5,200 invitations to former MIDWAY crew members and other invited guests. Decom Staff designed and ensured the Decommissioning Ceremony Program booklet was camera-ready for printing. This saved the Navy over $15,000 in printing costs. Decom Staff also ensured all other aspects of matter, including liaison with DOD, CNAP, CINCPACFLT, and CNO’s office, leading to the ceremony were accomplished properly and on time.

 

(2) The Decom Coordinator had a continual liaison with civilian contractors and PWC to set-up seating and staging and the sound system requirements for the ceremony. He ensured all materials needed for the ceremony were on hand or available, such as power requirements for the sound systems, the reception area and the media; coordinated and designated all key personnel assignments for the ceremony; was responsible for all the de-crewing and ceremonial rehearsals; and finally, wrote the script and the schedule of events for the Decommissioning Ceremony.

 

(3) The MIDWAY’s Decommissioning Ceremony was held at Naval Air station North Island, Carrier Piers M and N, on 11 April 1992, at 1100. The guest speaker for the ceremony was the Secretary of the Navy, the Honorable H. Lawrence Garrett, III. The ceremony was attended by over 3,000 invited guests and family members. Also in attendance were numerous former MIDWAY Commanding Officers.

 

(4) Due to the reorganization of the ship for decommissioning, PAO and the ship’s photographers were under the command of the Decom Coordinator. Since 1 January 1992, the Public Affairs Office has served in a support capacity to the Decom Coordinator while still maintaining basic public affairs functions. At the outset of the decommissioning process, MIDWAY’s public affairs functions were switched from the supervision of the Administrative Officer to the Decommissioning Ceremony Coordinator. This proved beneficial in that the ship’s decommissioning generated significant public interest in both the civilian and military communities. It allowed MIDWAY’s public affairs specialists to execute stages of Decommissioning Ceremony planning.

 

(5) The use of press releases benefited the ceremony planners by generating interest in the ceremony among former crew members. At a very early stage, press releases were made to military periodicals and newspapers as well as civilian publications with military target audiences. The releases announced the decommissioning, pointed out some of the ship’s historical highlights and provided former crewmembers and other interested parties with a point of contact for further information. This generated a vast pool of guests for the ceremony.

 

(6) Because MIDWAY’s decommissioning announcement had received fairly widespread coverage by the national media, the ship received a heavy flow of community relations mail throughout the decommissioning process. The staff Journalists generated responses to all community relations letters.

 

(7) One of the responsibilities of the Decommissioning Ceremony Coordinator was to provide a high quality souvenir program booklet for the ceremony. The booklet contained letters of congratulations from DoD and Navy officials, historical information and other ceremony information. The Public Affairs Staff completed all layout and design work, providing Navy Publishing and Printing service with a camera-ready product. This resulted in a savings of over $15,000 to the Navy. It also gave the command far greater control over the design of the booklet than would have been possible with civilian layout artists.

 

(8) The most important function of public affairs in the decommissioning process involved support for the civilian and military press. MIDWAY PAO generated a plan of action that stressed significant cooperation and coordination with COMNAVAIRPAC. MIDWAY’s plan was designed to give the press maximum access to the ship and her crew. By cooperating fully with the media, anticipating and meeting their requirements, MIDWAY received widespread positive press coverage.

 

(9) MIDWAY Public Affairs also provided support to the Commanding Officer by drafting appreciation letters to individuals helpful to the decommissioning, proposed letters of congratulations from Navy officials, and his remarks for the ceremony.

 

(10) Ship’s photographers were responsible for photographing all official MIDWAY functions. They also assisted with the layout and design of the Decommissioning Ceremony Program booklet.

 

 (11) Decom Coordinator, as senior Watch Officer was responsible for training all CDOs, ACDOs, all in port OODs and was responsible for the correct execution of all honors and ceremonies.

 

             (12)  Some statistics include:

 

             Mailed and collection 5,200 invitations

 

Designed the Decommissioning Ceremony Program

 

Conducted 20 scheduled tours with over 200 visitors

 

Community Relations: 124 letters were dispatched in response to civilian inquiries.

 

Press Releases: There were four releases made to 29 media outlets.

 

F. SUPPORT DEPARTMENT. The Support Department consists of nine divisions united to provide functional support to eight other departments. The department is made up of approximately 100 enlisted personnel and twelve officers. Divisions and their functions include:

 

(1) Executive Officer’s Admin Office. Provides administrative services for all internal directives, notices and daily publications including the Plan of the Day. The division serves as the focal point for award preparation, department watch-bills, and all internal correspondence.

 

(2) Berthing Barge. The division provides cleaning, maintenance and repair services for the two berthing barges, IX-503 and YRB-22. These two barges housed over 500 personnel, and provided office spaces for MIDWAY’s nine departments.

 

(3) Captain’s Office. This division provides administrative services for all outgoing and incoming official correspondence, including all printing and postal activities. The division also maintains all correspondence records, external directives and officer service records. The Ship’s Secretary serves as the Commanding Officer's personal point of contact for all scheduled events.

 

(4) Chaplain. This division provides religious programs, pastoral counseling, emergency assistance and personal attention for MIDWAY’s crew. Additional responsibilities include the establishment of the MIDWAY Room at San Diego’s Recruit Training Command.

 

(5) Communications. The division provides incoming and outgoing services for all narrative message traffic and visual signals. Continuous watches ensure flawless service. This division won the COMNAVAIRPAC Green “C” Award for 1991, for the second time in three years.

 

(6) Legal. This division provides legal counseling for the Commanding Officer, and assists in preparing all disciplinary cases for legal action. The undermanned division was assisted by the NAS North Island Naval Legal Services Office.

 

(7) Medical. This division provides routine medical care and emergency service aboard the berthing barges on a continuous basis. In conjunction with the NAS North Island Branch Medical Clinic, the division achieved a 100% HIV blood draw test for the crew.

Some interesting Medical statistics include:

 

Outpatients treated                                 963

Force-directed HIV Blood Draws        764

 

Because of the decommissioning process, the X-ray, Laboratory, Pharmacy and Medical Wards were closed. Medical was able to accomplish all tasks while undergoing a radical decrease in manning. There were no surgeries performed during this period.

 

(8) Personnel. This division provides all enlisted service record maintenance and transfer preparation for the crew. The division maintains an accurate crew assignment and location roster while transferring approximately fifty crewmembers each week. The division also made all preparations for the stand-up of the caretaker crew, a 250 man unit charged with completing the deactivation of MIDWAY after decommissioning.

 

USS MIDWAY CVB-41, CVA-41 & CV-41 HISTORY

(Decomissioning (11 April 1992) to Stricken

(17 March 1997 to Floating Museum (7 June 2004)

CHAPTER CVIII

 

 

     The Midway (CV-41), former CVA-41 & CVB-41, the 41st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 35th, commissioning on 10 September 1945, with Capt. Joseph F. Bolger in command, who had earned his wings in 1920, was awarded two Navy Crosses in World War II and commanded USS Intrepid (CV-11) in combat, the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II and sponsored by, Mrs. Bradford William Ripley, Jr.; commission pennant was hauled down on 11 April 1992, after nearly 47 years of active service, decommissioned a third time the same day and before years end was placed at the Navy Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility, Bremerton, Washington. Midway with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-14) embarked arrived North Island Naval Air Station, San Diego, California by the end of August 1991, with Captain Larry Lee Ernst, NAVCAD, 39th Commanding Officer Midway, served as the final CO from June 13, 1991 - April 11, 1992; ending her Final Cruise, steaming from Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, between 10 to 22 August 1998, and transfer from Yokosuka, Japan to NAS, NI, where she turned over with USS Independence (CV-62), replacing Midway as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, in the Western Pacific Region (5 October 1973 to 10 to 22 August 1991), disembarking CVW-5, operating as a forward-deployed unit out of Atsugi Naval Air Station, Japan, since 1973, at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, inport Pearl Harbor from 22 to 28 August 1991, which embarked Independence, replacing Midway as the forward-deployed carrier in Yokosuka, Japan between 22 to 28 August 1998, embarking CVW-14 from CV-62. CVW-14 (Squadrons: VFA-151, F-14A; VFA-113, F-14A; VFA-25, F/A-18A; VA-185 (*1), F/A-18A; VA-196, A-6E; VAW-113, E-2C; HS-8, SH-3H; VAQ-139, EA-6B and VRC-30 Det., C-2A. (*1) disestablished on Aug.30, 1991). . CVW-5 (Squadrons: VFA-195, FA-18A; VFA-151, FA-18A; VFA-192, FA-18A; VA-185, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VA-115, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2C; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HS-12, SH-3H. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system); ending her final mission, helping to evacuate 20,000 military personnel and their families from Clark Air Base in the Philippines after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in June, operating with USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), USS Peleliu (LHA-5), and twenty other U.S. Navy ships of the task force in support of Operation "Fiery Vigil" (Early June to June 1991), on her 55th U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, underway in the Pacific Ocean. Midway made her 54th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Arthur Karl Cebrowski, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her 54th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, on her 34th “WestPac”, underway in the Pacific Ocean, on her 48th South China Sea, her 14th Indian Ocean, her 8th Arabian Sea, 6th North Arabian Sea and 4th Gulf of Oman on her 2nd Arabian / Persian Gulf, operating under operational control of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, becoming the first carrier to enter the Arabian/Persian Gulf since 1974, on station in the North Arabian Sea, relieving USS Independence (CV-62) as in the leadup to the Gulf War on 1 November 1990, participating in Operation Imminent Thunder, an eight-day combined amphibious landing exercise in northeastern Saudi Arabia which involved about 1,000 U.S. Marines, 16 warships, and more than 1,100 aircraft on 15 November 1990 and participated in her 1st Operation Desert Storm to deter Iraqi aggression, commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991, when Operation Desert Shield commenced 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait) became Operation Desert Storm, The United Nations set an ultimatum deadline of 15 January 1991 for Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait. George H. W. Bush addressed the nation on 16 January 1991 at 9 p.m. EST and announced that the libration of Kuwait from Iraq, at which time the Navy launched 228 sorties from USS Ranger (CV-61) and Midway in the Persian Gulf, from USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) en route to the Gulf, and from USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), USS Saratoga (CV-60), and USS America (CV-66) in the Red Sea. In addition, the Navy launched more than 100 Tomahawk missiles from nine ships in the Mediterranean Sea, the Red Sea, and the Persian Gulf, continuing operations until Desert Storm officially ended 27 February, operating under operational control of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, operational control extending to the Indian Ocean. Midway’s aircraft joined those of the other carriers in flying combat air patrol, strike, reconnaissance, and rescue missions. The campaign was over in six weeks. Rear Admiral Daniel P. March, Commander, Carrier Group Five, became commander, Task Force 154 (Battle Force Zulu), part of Naval Forces Central Command. The Task Force directed four carriers (Midway), CV-61, CV-66, and CVN-71) in the Arabian Sea/Persian Gulf during Operation Desert Storm. On 6 February 1991, an F-14A Tomcat from VF-1, off USS Ranger (CV-61), piloted by Lt. Stuart Broce, with Cmdr. Ron McElraft as Radar Intercept Officer, downed an Iraqi MI-8 Hip helicopter with an AIM-9M Sidewinder missile. During Operation Desert Storm in 1991, Carriers operated under operational control of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command where it remained following the war. The Commander, Seventh Fleet served as naval component commander for Central Command. Since the Gulf War, NAVCENT fulfilled the roles of both a naval component command and as the fleet command. Ships from the East and West Coasts comprised the fleet, but it operated without a traditionally understood structure or number. Desert Storm officially ended 27 February 1991. Midway made two North Pacific Cruises, 34 “WestPac’s”, 55 Forward Deployed Deployments that consisted of foreign ports of call, 57 deployments since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. Her 63rd deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet for operations patrolling the Formosan Straits and the South China Sea, to become the first of her class to enter the Pacific, on her home port transfer to Bremerton Washington, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Midway joined the 7th Fleet on 6 February 1955 for operations in the Western Pacific, while operating with 7th Fleet in the Western Pacific in 1955, during which time her aircraft flew cover for the Nationalist evacuation of the Tachen islands off the coast of China during the Quemoy-Matsu crisis (27 December 1954 to 14 July 1955). Midway made three North Atlantic and Caribbean Sea Cruises, ending her seventh Mediterranean Sea deployment, extending operations into the Gulf of Syracuse next to the Ionian Sea operating with the 6th Fleet, steaming through the Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the U.S. Second Fleet and ComAirLant to the Mediterranean Sea (4 January to 4 August 1954); ending her sixth Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet, extending operations into the Aegean Sea, steaming through the Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the U.S. Second Fleet and ComAirLant to the Mediterranean Sea, to participate in “Operation Rendexvous,” a simulated exercise designed to maintain the high standard of readiness and battle efficiency of the NATO Defense Forces (1 December 1952 to 19 May 1953). Midway made one Southern Atlantic and Caribbean Sea deployment; one Caribbean Sea deployment; three North Atlantic and North Sea deployments, steaming in the Davis Straits, this time crossing the Arctic Circle with three destroyers and a fleet oilier testing equipment and techniques for cold weather operations on her first North Atlantic deployment, conducting a cold weather evaluation of aircraft, personnel and ships. Midway made her 73rd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II; launched on 20 March 1945 at the Newport News Shipbuilding Co., Newport News, Virginia, sponsored by, Mrs. Bradford William Ripley, Jr.; the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II; keel was laid down on 27 October 1943 by Newport News Shipbuilding Co., Newport News, Virginia; the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 84A & 1182).

 

     On 26 August 1992, President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel. The action was precipitated by Iraq's failure to comply with U.N. Resolution 688 which demanded that the Iraqi government stop the repression of its Shiite population in southern Iraq” (Ref. 1-Independence & 72).

 

     Persian Gulf allies began to enforce the ban on Iraqi planes from flying south of the 32nd parallel on 27 August in Operation Southern Watch. Any Iraqi planes that violated the ban would be shot down. Twenty Navy aircraft from CVW-5 aboard Independence in the Persian Gulf were the first coalition aircraft on station over Iraq as Operation Southern Watch began. Southern Watch was the enforcement of a ban on Iraqi warplanes and helicopters from flying south of the 32nd parallel” (Ref. 1-Independence & 72).

 

     On 2 May 2003, Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld announced the end of Afghan combat(Ref. 327).

 

     Towed from the dock at the Charles P. Howard Terminal in Oakland to San Diego, California and arrived on 5 January 2004. She docked at the Naval Air Station North Island to load historic aircraft for display” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

     The Midway (CV-41), former CVA-41 & CVB-41, the 41st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 35th, commissioning on 10 September 1945, with Capt. Joseph F. Bolger in command, who had earned his wings in 1920, was awarded two Navy Crosses in World War II and commanded USS Intrepid (CV-11) in combat, the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II and sponsored by, Mrs. Bradford William Ripley, Jr.; departed San Diego, California for the Navy Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility, Bremerton, Washington sometime after she was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 17 March 1997” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

     Acting Secretary of the Navy Hansford T. Johnson announced on 8 July 2003, that the Midway (CV-41), former CVA-41 & CVB-41, the 41st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 35th, commissioning on 10 September 1945, with Capt. Joseph F. Bolger in command, who had earned his wings in 1920, was awarded two Navy Crosses in World War II and commanded USS Intrepid (CV-11) in combat, the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II and sponsored by, Mrs. Bradford William Ripley, Jr., would be donated to the San Diego Aircraft Carrier Museum. Donated as a Museum and Memorial (status changed on 29 August 2003)” (Ref. 1086).

 

     On 30 September 2003, the Midway (CV-41), former CVA-41 & CVB-41, the 41st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 35th, commissioning on 10 September 1945, with Capt. Joseph F. Bolger in command, who had earned his wings in 1920, was awarded two Navy Crosses in World War II and commanded USS Intrepid (CV-11) in combat, the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II and sponsored by, Mrs. Bradford William Ripley, Jr., began her journey from the Navy Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility, Bremerton, Washington, to San Diego where she would be a Museum and Memorial via the Charles P. Howard Terminal in Oakland, Calif., remaining the first week in October while the construction of her pier in San Diego was completed” (Ref. 1086).

 

     The Midway (CV-41), former CVA-41 & CVB-41, the 41st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 35th, commissioning on 10 September 1945, with Capt. Joseph F. Bolger in command, who had earned his wings in 1920, was awarded two Navy Crosses in World War II and commanded USS Intrepid (CV-11) in combat, the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II and sponsored by, Mrs. Bradford William Ripley, Jr.; was docked at the Charles P. Howard Terminal in Oakland, Calif., in October 2003, while the construction of her pier in San Diego was completed. The carrier arrived in San Diego in January 2004 and is now the nation's newest Naval Aviation Museum” (Ref. 1086).

 

     The Midway (CV-41), former CVA-41 & CVB-41, the 41st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 35th, commissioning on 10 September 1945, with Capt. Joseph F. Bolger in command, who had earned his wings in 1920, was awarded two Navy Crosses in World War II and commanded USS Intrepid (CV-11) in combat, the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II and sponsored by, Mrs. Bradford William Ripley, Jr.; towed from the dock at the Charles P. Howard Terminal in Oakland to San Diego, California, arriving on 5 January 2004 at the Naval Air Station North Island to load historic aircraft for display” (Ref. 1086).

 

     The Midway (CV-41), former CVA-41 & CVB-41, the 41st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 35th, commissioning on 10 September 1945, with Capt. Joseph F. Bolger in command, who had earned his wings in 1920, was awarded two Navy Crosses in World War II and commanded USS Intrepid (CV-11) in combat, the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II and sponsored by, Mrs. Bradford William Ripley, Jr.; was moored at her final location at the Broadway Pier in San Diego, Calif., arriving 10 January 2004, joining four other World War II-era sister carriers of the Essex class as a floating museum, the centerpiece of a revived waterfront in San Diego, Calif. One of the longest serving aircraft carriers in U.S. Navy history continues on in a second life as a symbol of Naval Aviation past and present. Norman Polmar is a naval analyst, author, and consultant. Among his 50 published books is the two-volume Aircraft Carriers: A History of Carrier Aviation and Its Impact on World Events (Dulles, Va: Potomac Books, 2006 and 2008). This feature is based in part on that work” (Ref. 1083).

 

     The Midway (CV-41), former CVA-41 & CVB-41, the 41st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 35th, commissioning on 10 September 1945, with Capt. Joseph F. Bolger in command, who had earned his wings in 1920, was awarded two Navy Crosses in World War II and commanded USS Intrepid (CV-11) in combat, the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II and sponsored by, Mrs. Bradford William Ripley, Jr.; will be Opened to the public as a floating museum ship on 7 June 2004,  devoted to carriers and naval aviation, while visitors may visit the flight deck, hanger bays, and mess hall levels of the ships, taking audio tours and viewing various exhibits of full sized aircraft of all types” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & 1178-G). 

 

USS Midway (CV-41), former CVA-41 & CVB-41

OVERHAULS

CHAPTER CIX Part 1 of 2

 

SHIP

Moored at her final location

DATE

Museum

DATE

USS Midway (CV-41), former CVA-41 & CVB-41

Arrved at the Broadway Pier in San Diego, Calif., joining four other World War II-era sister carriers of the Essex class as a floating museum, the centerpiece of a revived waterfront in San Diego, Calif.

10/01/04

Opened to the public at the Broadway Pier in San Diego, Calif

07/06/04

“The Midway (CV-41), former CVA-41 & CVB-41, the 41st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 35th, commissioning on 10 September 1945, with Capt. Joseph F. Bolger in command, who had earned his wings in 1920, was awarded two Navy Crosses in World War II and commanded USS Intrepid (CV-11) in combat, the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II and sponsored by, Mrs. Bradford William Ripley, Jr.; launched on 20 March 1945 at the Newport News Shipbuilding Co., Newport News, Virginia; the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II and sponsored by, Mrs. Bradford William Ripley, Jr.; keel was laid down on 27 October 1943 by Newport News Shipbuilding Co., Newport News, Virginia; the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

“American naval power in the first few years after World War II was personified by two warships—the battleship USS Missouri (BB-63), which hosted the Japanese surrender at the end of the war, and the aircraft carrier USS Midway (CVB-41). When placed in commission in September 1945, Midway was the world’s largest warship. There had been one larger aircraft carrier, 27,100-ton carriers of the Essex (CV-9) class. This last ship had been considered earlier by the Navy’s General Board, which proposed a large carrier with an armored flight deck and would be particularly well compartmented below decks to help resist battle damage” (Ref. 1083).

“The Midway is the first in the CVB class of 45,000-ton aircraft carriers--- largest, fastest, and toughest in the world. Her overall length is 968 feet; width, 136 feet, Around 3,500 officers and men constitute the complement of the Midway. They come from every state in the Union and the District of Columbia. Over 100 planes, Corsair (F4U's) and Helldiver (SB2C's) types, make up the Air Group, No. 74, aboard the Midway. There are four squadrons. On the morning of 10 September 1945 at 0832, the Midway moved out of the building yard at Newport News and headed across the James River under her own power for the Norfolk Navy Yard at Portsmouth, VA.

Following information from National Archives – Deck Log – Remarks Sheet – Monday, September 10, 1945:

 

The CVB-41 Midway was built for the US Navy by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company of Newport News, Virginia. The ship is moored starboard side in Berth Two, Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Virginia, with the Pre-Commissioning Detail aboard and with the following line out: #3 – Two 10” manila with a standing part and a bight on each; #4 – Two 1-5/8” wire with a standing part and a bight; #5 – One 10” manila with a standing part and a bight; #7 – One 1-5/8” wire with a bight; #8 – One 1-5/8” wire with a bight; #9 – Two 10” manila with a standing part and a bight; #10 – One 1-5/8” wire.  Ships present:  USS West Point, USS Sangamon and various yard and district craft. S.O.P.A., Captain Webb C. Hayes, USNR in USS West Point.

 

At 1435 this date the officers and crew were paraded aft on the Flight Deck for the Commissioning Ceremony.

 

At 1455 the Commandant of the Fifth Naval District, Rear Admiral W. L. Ainsworth, USN; Commander Air Force Atlantic Fleet, Vice Admiral P. N. L. Bellinger, USN; Commandant Norfolk Navy Yard, Rear Admiral C. H. Jones, USN; came aboard with the commissioning party consisting of Under Secretary of the Navy, the Honorable A. L. Gates and Assistant Secretary of War for Air Mr. R. Lovett; certain high ranking naval officers and the President of the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Mr. H. L. Ferguson; with their families and guests.

 

There at 1500, Rear Admiral C. H. Jones, Commandant of the Norfolk Navy Yard, turned the ship over to her prospective commanding officer, Captain Joseph F. Bolger, USN, who read his orders and accepted command. The Hon. Artemus L. Gates, Under Secretary of the Navy, was the principal speaker for the commissioning ceremony and .hailed the carrier as representing "a great milestone in our naval history". Many other high dignitaries were in attendance. Also on hand as a speaker was Lieutenant George Gay, USNR, sole survivor of the carrier HORNET’s famed Torpedo Squadron Eight which pressed home attacks on enemy carriers off Midway, 4 June 1942, despite overwhelming opposition by enemy fighter planes.

 

At 1506 the Chaplain, Lieutenant Commander W. W. Winter (ChC) USN invoked the aid of the Almighty in the mission of this fine ship on which this unit is about to embark.

 

At 1508 the Commandant of the Norfolk Navy Yard read his orders from the Secretary of the Navy, accepting the vessel from the Builders for the Navy, and ordered that it be placed in full commission. The Band played the National Anthem, and the National Ensign and Commissioning Pennant were hoisted.  Immediately following, the Under Secretary of the Navy’s Flag was broken and full honors were rendered.

At 1511 Captain Joseph F. Bolger, USN, read his orders dated 15 February 1945 and assumed command of the USS Midway (CVB-41).


At 1518 the watch was set with Commander Lloyd W. Parrish, USN, Navigating Officer, taking the first watch as Officer of the Deck.

 

At 1519 Under Secretary Gates addressed the officers, crew and guests.

 

At the time of the commissioning 156 officers and 2,527 members of the crew reported aboard as per lists in the Captain’s and Executive Officer’s Offices.

 

At 1526 benediction was given by the Chaplain, Lieutenant P. A. Lloyd (ChC) USN.

 

At 1528 the Captain ordered “Pipe Down”, and the routine of the ship commenced.

 

At 1558 Under Secretary Gates left the ship with several ranking officers of the official commissioning party and received full honors.

 

At 1800 Boatwright, James W. Jr., Pharmacist, 454048, USN reported aboard for duty pursuant to orders of Commanding General, Marine Barracks, Parris Island, SC, orders dated 8 Sept., 1945.

 

At 2000 orders dated 2 July 1945, Lieutenant Walter E. Rogers, 19587, USNR and Ensign Donald I. Lahti, 452771, USNR reported aboard for temporary duty” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 15 December 1945).

 

ORIGINAL STATIST1CS (1945)

 

LENGTH OVERALLS                                                  968'
EXTREME BREADTH (at or about flight deck)        136'

STANDARD DISPLACEMENT:

Tons:                                                                                  45,000

Maximum Navigational drafts                                       35’

DESIGNED SPEED:

Knots:                                                                                 33

TOTAL ACCOMMODATIONS:

Officer:                                                                              379

Enlisted:                                                                            3,725

ARMAMENT:

Primary:                                                                            (18)       5”/54

Secondary:                                                                        (21) quad, 40-mm

USS Midway (CVB-41) remained in the Norfolk Navy Yard for fitting out from 11 September to 12 October 1945 when she commenced operations from Norfolk Va., after a 40-day period in the yard during which necessary alterations were made, with Joseph Francis Bolger, USNA ’21, as Commanding Officer” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

USS Midway (CVB-41) returned to Norfolk Va., after a 40-day period in the yard during which necessary alterations were made, with Joseph Francis Bolger, USNA ’21, as Commanding Officer, weighed anchor in Gravesend Bay, New York after celebrating Navy Day from 24 to 30 October 1945; steaming en route from Norfolk, VA to New York, in company with ComDesdiv. 136 – USS Vogelgesang (DD-862) and USS Steinaker (DD-863) before heading into the Caribbean Sea” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & National Archives – Deck Log – Remarks Sheet – October 24, 1945; USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 15 December 1945).

USS Midway (CVB-41) was in the Norfolk Navy Yard from 11 June 1946 to 4 April 1947, for extensive alterations and the crew began extensive preparations for the launching of V-2 from the flight deck, shifting to Pier 5, at Norfolk, Virginia” (Ref. 1175G, USS Midway (CV 41) WestPac Cruise Book 1987-89 & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 15 December 1946 & 1947).

USS Midway (CVB-41) conducted Overhaul in the Norfolk Navy Yard from 22 March to 30 September 1948 (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1948).

USS Midway (CVB-41) conducted a five month Overhaul at Norfolk, Va, Shipyard for installation of new rapid-fire gun batteries and a heavier flight deck capable of handling new jet planes, shortly after arrival from her fourth Mediterranean Sea deployment on 10 November 1950 to 24 April 1951 and followed by exercises out of Norfolk including Carrier Qualification landings and gunnery exercises off the coast of North Carolina with the U. S. Second Fleet before going into the yards for a fresh coat of paint” (Ref. 1175G & 1181L).

USS Midway (CVB-41) underwent routine overhaul and repairs upon return from the Mediterranean Sea on 5 May 1952” (Ref. 1175G).

 

“From 26 to 29 May 1952, the feasibility of the angled deck concept was demonstrated in tests conducted on a simulated angled deck aboard USS Midway (CVB-41) by Naval Air Test Center pilots and Atlantic Fleet pilots in both jet and prop aircraft” (Ref. 1- Midway & 72).

 

“After a brief upkeep period in the Norfolk Navy Yard” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1952).

USS Midway (CVA-41) underwent minor repairs in the Norfolk, Va. Navy Yard from 24 October to 14 November 1952, when she resumed local operations, out of Norfolk, Va.” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1952).

USS Midway (CVA-41) conducted a five month Overhaul in the Norfolk Navy Yard from  29 May to 26 October 1953 redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 1182, 1181Z9 & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1953).

USS Midway (CVA-41) departed Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco, Ca. on 30 June 1958, for return to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, conducting up keep and repairs from 25 to 30 June 1958 (Ref. AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV FORM 5750-2 (6-57) PAGE 1 (1 January to 31 March 1958) and (1 April to 30 June 1958) of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1958).

“The Midway (CVA-41), former CVB, the 41st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 35th, commissioning on 10 September 1945, conducted SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington, entering on 3 August 1955, shortly after she returned from her sixth Mediterranean Sea deployment via Naval Air Station, Alameda, California and was decommissioned (15 October 1955) and recommissioned (30 September 1957), with Captain Francis Edward Nuessle, USNA ’32, relieving Captain Richard Spalding Rogers, USNA ‘37, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard Midway on 7 September 1955, relieving Captain Reynold Delos Hogle, USNA ‘29, 14th Commanding Officer, serving from October 1, 1954 - September 7, 1955, relieving Captain Francis E. Nuessle, as Commanding Officer on 30 September 1957 and Commander Lester B. Libbey, Jr., Executive Officer beginning in August 1955. The largest and most modern ship on the Pacific Coast. Total cost of conversion raw well over fifty-five million dollars. Installations an island structure, two steam catapults on the bow and a third shorter steam cat in the new angled flight deck. The purpose of the third catapult was to allow ready deck launches while keeping the landing area clear for recoveries in an “alert” situation. Additional improvements included the installation of a hurricane (enclosed) bow, moving elevator number three to the starboard deck edge aft of the island, and enlarging number one elevator to accommodate longer aircraft. On recommissioning in September 1957, Midway’s load displacement had grown from 55,000 to 62,000 tons. An increased fuel capacity, and latest electronic equipment ensured Midway to be one of thee most effective fighting aerodromes afloat” (Ref. 1176A, 1176G, 1176I, 1081N & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1955).

“After a conversion that was two years in the making, at a cost of over fifty million dollars, USS Midway (CVA-41) was re-commissioned 30 September 1957, with Captain Francis E. Nuessle in command at Puget Sound Naval Ship­yard after being decommissioned two years undergoing extensive conversion. Vice Admiral George W. Anderson, Jr., Chief of Staff of the Pacific Command was the principal speaker during the ceremonies held aboard Midway arrived at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, on 8 August 1955 and placed out of commission, in the Puget Sound Navy Yard on 15 October 1955 for conversion which included installation of an angle flight deck. The conversion included the following:

 

1. All bomb elevators modified and re-located.

 

2. Gallery deck and island structure air-conditioned and sound-absorbing panels installed.

 

3. Hurricane bow installed

 

4. Angled deck installed.

 

5. Addition of Steam Catapults.

 

6. New-type arresting gear installed.

 

7. No. 3 elevator relocated to starboard side.

 

8. Aft end of stack modified and new structure ("pri-fly") installed (Space enclosed with electric-conductor glass).

 

9. A wider ship's beam—with four (4) feet extended on each side of the ship. (This was accomplished by addition of fuel tanks and voids)

 

10. New boat and aircraft crane installed on flight deck. (Its capacity is 50,000 lbs.—the largest crane ever installed on any such conversion)

 

11. Wet accumulators for steam catapults added. (MIDWAY is the first ship to have this addition. These accumulators give better-controlled catapult speed, occupy less space, and are more economical than the old-type retrievers)

12. Addition of approximately five (5) times more deck tile than any other conversion.

 

13. HEAF (JP-5) tanks (Kerosene tanks) installed. (This is the first ship to have this new-type tank installed. Only one-fourth (1/4) original tanks (gasoline)

 

14. All living spaces enlarged and greatly modernized” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1957).

“USS Midway (CVA-41) Historical Report for period 30 September 1957 to 31 December 1957” (Ref. AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV FORM 5750-2 (6-57) PAGE 1 of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1957).

 

MILES STEAMED:  2765     

FUEL CONSUMED – 1,622,697 gals.          

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION:

 

Location:                                                                           Period:

 

PUGET SOUND NAVAL SHIPYARD                       30 SEP 57 – 2 DEC 57

NAD BANGOR, WASHINGTON                                2 DEC 57 – 6 DEC 57

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON                                          6 DEC 57 – 10 DEC 57

NAS ALAMEDA, CALIFORNIA                                14 DEC 57 – 31 DEC 57

 

PARTICIPATION IN OPERATIONAL TESTS

 

Post repair Trials in Puget Sound from 9 to 11 October 1957                         

Command and Area:  COMTHIRTEEN

Report and Orders:  CVA-41/A-9-6 Ser 45

 

“On 23 October 1957, the Pacific Board of Inspection and Survey came aboard for acceptance trials and inspections.  The entire plant including damage control material and procedures were thoroughly tested and inspected with discrepancies noted.  (Ref. (c), CVA-41/58 Ser 407/42 of 5 NOV 1957)  Included in these tests and inspections, were a four hour full power run with a crash back down and crash ahead.  A lock shaft drill on number two and four shafts was also included” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1957).

 

PARTICIPATION IN OPERATIONAL TESTS

 

Test: BI & S:  Board of Inspection and Survey Trial for acceptance of vessel following conversion.  This included a four hour full power run from 28 October to 1 November 1957.

 

Command and Area:  COMTHIRTEEN

Report and Orders:  CVA-41/58 Ser 407/42 5 NOV 57

Reporting Period from 30 SEP 57 to 31 DEC 57.

 

Dependents Day Cruise on 2 December 1957.

 

Taking on of ammunition at Naval Ammunition Depot, Bangor, Wa. from 2 to 6 December 1957.

After initial trials and in-service board acceptance Midway became part of the Pacific Fleet, attached to Commander Naval Air, Pacific Fleet for both Administrative and Operational Control on 7 December 1957.

 

Open House at Seattle, Washington from 6 to 10 December 1957.

 

Midway departed Seattle on 10 December 1957 for Shakedown Training oper­ations off the coast of California, conducted from the port of San Francisco and San Diego.

 

PERSONNEL ON BOARD:

 

Officer:                          Aviators 30                    Air Pilots --      Other 87           Total 117

Enlisted:                            ---                               0                        2388                  2388

 

MISSION OR FUNCTION:  USS Midway (CVA-41) will provide mobile base facilities for the effective employment of the military potential of embarked aircraft squadrons and detachments.

 

Training was conducted in ship preservation, familiarization with equipment, damage control, general drills and all areas of training suggested by Fleet Training Group, San Diego, Ca. en route to Alameda, California, Home Port of Midway (10 to 14 December 1957).

 

On arriving at Alameda, 14 December 1955, the crew embarked on a well deserved leave period.

 

Holiday and Leave Period from 14-31 December 1957” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1957).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) OPERATIONAL STATISTICS

 

MONTH:  OCTOBER

PILOTS ON BOARD:  29

HOURS FLOWN: 152

FLIGHTS:  TRAINING:  21   SERVICE: 5     COMBAT: -0- TOTAL 26

 

MONTH:  NOVEMBER

PILOTS ON BOARD:  29      

HOURS FLOWN: 188

FLIGHTS:  TRAINING:  30   SERVICE: 2     COMBAT: -0- TOTAL 32

 

MONTH:  DECEMBER

PILOTS ON BOARD: 30       

HOURS FLOWN: 231

FLIGHTS:  TRAINING: 46    SERVICE -0-   COMBAT: -0- TOTAL 46

 

TOTAL:  HOURS FLOWN:  571      

TRAINING: 97   SERVICE: 7            COMBAT: -0- TOTAL: 104

 

30 September to 31 December 1957

 

1.  General. After a conversion that was two years in the making, at a cost of over fifty million dollars, Midway was commissioned 30 September 1957 at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington. Vice Admiral George W. ANDERSON, Jr., Chief of Staff of the Pacific Command was the principal speaker during the ceremonies held aboard Midway. Captain Francis E. NUESSLE assumed command.

 

2.  Conversion.

 

a.  Most easily recognized of Midway’s new features are the addition of the angled flight deck, jutting off the port side, and the hurricane bow. The angled flight deck will give Midway the capability of recovering and launching aircraft simultaneously as well as adding to the overall safety of carrier operations. In addition to making the ship less vulnerable to heavy seas the enclosed bow gives the ship a more clean, fast, modern profile.

 

b.  Another major installation was the changeover to steam catapults and the addition of one extra catapult at the waist of the ship off the angled deck.  Wet accumulators are used on all "cats" giving better controlled catapult speed as well as occupying less space and being more economical.

 

c.  Most noticeable from the crews’ standpoint is the emphasis on "livability" aboard Midway.  Many of the living spaces have been air-conditioned.  All have been painted harmonizing pastel shades. Each man has his own large individual locker and a reading lamp over his bunk.  Living spaces, as well as most working spaces, are decked with green tile, taking away some of the typical drab appearance found on combat vessels.

 

d.  Other features include:

 

(1) Number three elevator relocated to starboard side.

 

(2) Bomb elevators modified and relocated.

 

(3) Gallery deck and island structure air-conditioned and sound absor­bing panels installed.

New type arresting gear installed.

 

A wider ship's beam with four feet extended on each side of the ship.  This was caused by the addition of fuel tanks and voids.  HEAF (JP-5) tanks were added making Midway the first ship to have these new-type tanks installed.

 

A new boat and aircraft crane installed on the flight deck.  Its capacity of 45,000 tons makes it the largest crane installed on any such conversion.

 

(7) The aft end stack modified and a new structure on the island (Pri-Fly) installed.

 

3. Post Commissioning.

 

a.  Since conversion, Midway’s big job has been the training of her crew and integrating them into one large team of single purpose. Much time has also been spent in the huge task of ''housecleaning” after departure of the yard personnel and the subsequent cleaning needed to keep shipshape.

 

b.  Tests, inspections and various sea trials were also conducted during this period in order to ascertain Midway’s sea worthiness and capabilities. These are mentioned later in this report.

 

4.  Departmental Comments.  Problems met prior to, and after commissioning were handled effectively by the ship's departments and it is felt worthy to include here some of the more important happenings to each department.

 

a. Engineer.

 

(1) Upon commissioning the engineers assumed much of the responsibility for test, inspection and maintenance of the engineering plant with technical and other assistance provided by Puget Sound Naval Shipyard.  A short period, 9-11 October was spent on sea trials in Puget Sound to determine any defects in workmanship and material not previously found.  (Ref. (b), CVA-41/A-9-6 Ser 45) The major problem found was leakage in the superheated tubes of Boiler number 4-C.  Work was done to remedy this by the ship's force assisted by Puget Sound Naval Shipyard personnel.

 

(2) On 23 October, the Pacific Board of Inspection and Survey came aboard for acceptance trials and inspections.  The entire

plant including damage control material and procedures were thoroughly tested and inspected with discrepancies noted.  (Ref. (c), CVA-41/58 Ser 407/42 of 5 NOV 1957)  Included in these tests and inspections, were a four hour full power run with a crash back down and crash ahead.  A lock shaft drill on number two and four shafts was also included.

 

(3) While enroute to Alameda, 10-l4 December, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard conducted special tests on Boiler number 2B to determine overload capabilities when operating on three burners.

 

b.  Gunnery.

 

(l) The Gunnery departments’ main job after commissioning was one of preparation of spaces and readying of equipment.  In addition many and various directives, organizational and instructional bills had to be drawn.  For many of the men carriers were new duty and it was difficult orientating them to carrier methods.  A lack of previous or similar instructions to use as formats as well as a lack of bureau and command publications and directives handicapped Gunnery's initial efforts.

 

(2) Working at seventy five percent of allowance all equipment was finally made operative.  The three inch battery required special effort to get it in condition.  The alignment of the batteries and fire control equipment required the efforts of all gunnery personnel.  At the same time, preparation was being made for taking on ammunition at Bangor Naval Ammunition Depot. Non skid paint was applied, battens built and brackets installed.  The preparations paid off however and the loading operation came off smoothly without incident.

 

(3) The reminder of the time gunnery has spent in intensive training in drills arid the use of equipment, as well as indoctrination of a green crew in every day shipboard living.

 

c. Operations.

 

(1) The primary task of the Operations department during this period has been the coordination of the ships' activities and implementation of a long range training program designed to bring the ship up to operational standards. This training program brought the ship a long way toward being prepared for its' underway training period.  The training included individual and team training, and finally, simulated battle problems.  It is felt that an automatic distribution of all applicable publications, directives and instructions would have greatly facilitated operations throughout the post-commissioning phase. In many instances instructions referenced or required were not at hand and had to be ordered.

 

(2) During the first months after commissioning CIC and Air Operations completed their organizational and operational doctrines.  Also during post repair trials all operating gear was checked out and deficiencies corrected.

(3) d.  Administrative.

 

(1) A precomissioning detail, the nucleus crew, was formed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, as early as May 1957, and a precomissioning unit, the balance crew, at Fleet Training Center, San Diego, California.  The nucleus crew consisted primarily of personnel from the USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) just decommissioned at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in May 1957.  The balance crew began arriving at Fleet Training Center, San Diego in July 1957 and gradually built up to a maximum of 1850 personnel in August.

 

(2) Formal training commenced at NTC 12 August 1957.  Sufficient per­sonnel had arrived in early July to enable some class room training to commence ahead of schedule.  This permitted some personnel to report to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard ahead of time and begin familiarization with the ship.

(3) The staging of personnel ordered to the balance crew it San Diego presented some difficulty for both the clerical personnel of the balance crew and the Training Coordinator of  the Fleet Training Center. The input of personnel varied from 10 to 200 personnel per day.  The input continued through early September which resulted in some personnel receiving only a token amount of training, if any.  Also a distinct lack of qualified officers was ordered to the balance crew in time to effect proper supervision of the men.  Some departments had no officer representation.

 

(4) Approximately 1,200 of the balance crew remaining at Fleet Training Center at the completion of normal training on 22 September were transported, with ten officers, to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard via the U. S. N. S., arriving at Bremerton on 26 September.

 

             f.  Medical.

 

(l) The initial outfitting a11owance of medical supplies originally scheduled to arrive at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard prior to commissioning did not arrive on board until after commissioning.  This was due to a change in mission of the Medical Supply Depot, Oakland, California and the transfer of that supply function to Sharpe General Depot, Lathrop, California.  It was felt the initial outfitting allowance was not adequate for a chip this size.

 

g.  Dental.

 

(1) Prior to commissioning, Dental officers and enlisted personnel not primarily assigned the duty of departmental organization

were utilized by Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Dental Dispensary for routine dental procedures.  Prospective Midway personnel were encouraged to have necessary dental treatment accomplished prior to commissioning in so far as possible. This arrangement lessened the load during the period immediately after commissioning

(2) The Prospective Dental Officer set up the organization of the Dental Department, at the same time rendering dental treatment ashore.  Dental Depart­ment Publications, Manuals and BUMED Instructions would have aided the Prospective Dental Officer in the guidance of setting up the administrative organization, but these were never received.

 

(3) Some rearrangement of certain equipment in the dental spaces was considered advisable and recommended by the Prospective Dental Officer.  Other changes, such as the relocation of the sterilizers could not be accomplished because of the advanced state of completion and the cost involved in changing the installation.

 

(4) The initial outfitting list of dental supplies did not arrive in time to have the Dental Department functioning aboard ship at the time of commissioning.  The shipment of Dental Department material from Supply centers could have been separated from Medical Department material eliminating an undue amount of handling and time consumed in separating dental from medical supplies.

 

(5)  During this period Midway played host to many and various groups of civilian personnel.  Guests from both military and civilian life attended the commissioning ceremonies.  A dependents cruise contained several civic groups as well as families of the crew.  Guests were counted by thousands during a three day "open house" at Seattle, Washington, and on the voyage from Seattle to Alameda forty one quests of the Secretary of the Navy sampled Midway’s hospitality.

 

(6) On arriving at Alameda, 14 December 1957, the crew embarked on a well deserved leave period” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1957).

USS Midway (CVA-41) departed Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco, California for Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on or before 1 April 1959, arriving 14 March 1959” (Ref. 1177-B, 1177-A & AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV FORM 5750-2 (6-57) PAGE 1 (1 January to 31 March 1959) and (1 April to 30 June 1959) of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1959).

USS Midway (CVA-41) AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV

REPORT 5750-3 of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1960). (1

April to 30 September 1960) – Chapter 17, Appendix IV.

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) remained at Long Beach Naval Station from 1 to 2 October

1960” (Ref. AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV REPORT 5750-3 (1 October 1960 to 31 March 1961) of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1960 & 1961).

USS Midway (CVA-41) departed Long Beach Naval Station on 3 October 1960, for operations in the Eastern Pacific” (Ref. AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV REPORT 5750-3 (1 October 1960 to 31 March 1961) of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1960 & 1961).

USS Midway (CVA-41) returned to Long Beach Naval Station on 7 October 1960, conducting operations in the Eastern Pacific from 3 to 7 October 1960” (Ref. AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV REPORT 5750-3 (1 October 1960 to 31 March 1961) of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1960 & 1961).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) remained at Long Beach Naval Station from 8 to 10 October 1960” (Ref. AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV REPORT 5750-3 (1 October 1960 to 31 March 1961) of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1960 & 1961).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) departed Long Beach Naval Station on 11 Otober 1960, for

operations in the Eastern Pacific” (Ref. AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY

OPNAV REPORT 5750-3 (1 October 1960 to 31 March 1961) of USS MIDWAY

Command History for Calendar Year 1960 & 1961).

USS Midway (CVA-41) remained at the San Francisco Naval Shipyard, San Francisco, Ca. under going intensive upkeep and repair work from 3 October to 3 November 1961, shiftng back to the Naval Air Station, Alameda, California. Following this yard period MIDWAY conducted carrier qualifications for various units until CVG-2 came aboard in January 1962” (Ref. AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV FORM 5750-2 (6-57) PAGE 1 (1 October to 31 March 1962) of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1961).

USS Midway (CVA-41) entered dry-dock at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco, California on 7 December 1962” (Ref. 1081Z9 & AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV FORM 5750-2 (REV. 4-60) (1 April to 30 September 1962) of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1962).

 

Hunters Point NSY, 1962. NS024140. Submitted by: Chester Morris, Midway Crew Member 1962-65. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024140.jpg

 

“On 24 January 1963, 250 members of the A.S.M.E. (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) were given a tour of the USS Midway (CVA-41). This was especially interesting to them as they were able to see naval machinery and spaces which were torn down and in the process of being overhauled” (Ref. AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV FORM 5750-2 (REV. 4-60) (1 April to 30 September 1962) of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1962).

“Capt. Leroy E. Harris, former Commanding Officer of the USS Vesuvius (AE-15) relieved Capt. Roy M. Isaman as Commanding Officer of the USS Midway (CVA-41) on 25 January 1963 in Change of Command ceremonies conducted aboard” (Ref. AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV FORM 5750-2 (REV. 4-60) (1 April to 30 September 1962) of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1962).

 

“During this period the facilities of Fleet Schools and training activities were heavily utilized for training new men reporting aboard and maintaining the proficiency of others. Extensive training was also conducted aboard. USS Midway (CVA-41) closed circuit television system commenced operations in February 1963 and is utilized in the training program” (Ref. AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV FORM 5750-2 (REV. 4-60) (1 April to 30 September 1962) of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1962).

 

 

Hunters Point NSY, 1962. NS024139. Submitted by: Chester Morris, Midway Crew Member 1962-65.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024139.jpg

“During the period 1 October 1962 to 31 March 1963, USS Midway (CVA-41) received a major Overhaul at the San Francisco Naval Ship Yard. The breakdown by departments lists the major repairs, modifications, and installations effected and is located in AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV FORM 5750-2 (REV. 4-60) (1 October 1962 to 31 March 1963) of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1962 & 1963) – Chapter 29, Appendix II.

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) remained at the San Francisco Naval Shipyard dry-dock at Hunters Point, San Francisco, California from 7 December 1962 to 9 April 1963. During the period of this report, Midway received a major Overhaul at the San Francisco Naval Ship Yard. The breakdown by departments lists the major repairs, modifications, and installations effected. During this period the facilities of Fleet Schools and training activities were heavily utilized for training new men reporting aboard and maintaining the proficiency of others. Extensive training was also conducted aboard. The ships' closed circuit television system commenced operations in February 1963 and is utilized in the training program. On 24 January 1963, 250 members of the A.S.M.E. (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) were given a tour of the ship. This was especially interesting to them as they were able to see naval machinery and spaces which were torn down and in the process of being overhauled. Capt. Leroy E. Harris, former Commanding Officer of the USS Vesuvius (AE-15) relieved Capt. Roy M. Isaman as Commanding Officer of the USS Midway on 25 January 1963 in Change of Command ceremonies conducted aboard” (Ref. 1081Z9 & AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV FORM 5750-2 (REV. 4-60) (1 April to 30 September 1962) & (1 October 1962 to 31 March 1963) of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1962 & 1963):

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) at Anchorage 35, San Francisco, California from 9 to 11 April 1963, than moored at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California” (Ref. AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV FORM 5750-2 (REV. 4-60) (1 April to 30 September 1963) of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1963).

USS Midway (CVA-41) conducted Availabilty at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard from 3 to 29 June 1964. During the June shipyard availability the number three elevator, which was lost overboard during the cruise, was replaced” (Ref. AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV FORM 5750-2 (REV. 4-60) (1 April to 30 September 1964) of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1964).

USS Midway (CVA-41) conducted Restricted Availability Period (RAV) from 7 November to 19 January 1964, placed in dry dock on 13 November 1964, at the US Naval Shipyard, San Francisco, California or San Francisco Shipyard, Hunters Point, California for replacement of the Number 1 screw and renewal of the boiler bottom blow piping. Midway had extensive welding repairs to cracks in the four high pressure turbines. Also during this period a stowage area was added on the 01 level aft for buddy-stores” (Ref. AVIATION HISTORICAL SUMMARY OPNAV FORM 5750-2 (REV. 4-60) (1 October 1964 to 31 March 1965) of USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1965).

“The Midway (CV-41), former CVB-41, the 41st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 35th, commissioning on 10 September 1945, commenced SCB-101, the most extensive modernization ever completed on a naval vessel that fitted with an enlarged flight deck, steam catapults, and new elevators and arresting gear to handle heavier aircraft on 11 February 1966 at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay, for which she was placed in Pacific Fleet Reserve, in commission special and decomissioned a second time 15 February 1966 completed on a naval vessel that fitted with an enlarged flight deck, steam catapults, and new elevators and arresting gear to handle heavier aircraft” (Ref. 1180A, 1180B, 1181N, 1183 & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

 

Aerial view of the San Francisco Naval Shipyard at Hunters Point, sometime between April and July 1968. USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) and USS Hancock (CVA-19) are easily identifiable. Also visible in this photo are Midway (CVA-41), undergoing her SCB-101.66 modernization in the drydock just aft of Coral Sea, and USS Oriskany (CVA-34), undergoing an 8-month overhaul in the background. NS024345. Submitted by: Robert M. Cieri. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024345.jpg

 

VADM Allen M. Shinn, COMAIRPAC, speaking at the Re-Commissioning Ceremonies of USS Midway (CVA-41) at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, 31 January 1970. NS0241ar. Submitted by: Darryl Baker. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/0241ar.jpg

The Midway (CV-41), former CVB-41, the 41st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 35th, commissioning on 10 September 1945, completed SCB-101 and recommissioned a second time at 1100U on 31 January 1970 at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay (11 February 1966 to 31 January  1970), placed in Pacific Fleet Reserve, in commission special and decomissioned a second time 15 February 1966. The recommissioning ceremony took place at piers 15 and 16 at the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco, California on a chilly but clear and sunny day. The ceremony was conducted on the hangar deck and was attended by an overflow crowd.  Captain Eugene J. CARROLL, Jr. assumed command of Midway and reported for duty to Commander Carrier Division Seven, Rear Admiral Ray ISAMAN. Midway was placed in commission by Rear Admiral Leo MC CUDDIN, Commandant of the Twelfth Naval District. The principal speaker at the commissioning was Vice Admiral Allen SHINN, Commander Naval Air Force, U, S. Pacific Fleet. Also in attendance were several former USS Midway Commanding Officers. Following the ceremony Captain CARROLL cut the 300 pound commissioning cake and served the first piece to the youngest sailor aboard, 17 year old Fireman James HEWITT, of Livermore, California. The next piece of cake was served by Admiral SHINN to the senior enlisted man aboard, AFCM Donald ZENTZ, a 27 year man. The ship was open the remainder of the day and 1 February for tours, sight seeing and light refreshments. In all approximately 18,000 visitors toured the ship on these two days. Also on 1 February the first religious service, Catholic Mass, was celebrated on Midway. With Midway now a commissioned ship, the completion of unfinished work took on a greater urgency and was undertaken with renewed vigor by ship’s force and shipyard personnel. A reassuring routine event occurred amidst the hectic construction activity when the ship's Dental Department commenced routine patient treatment on 2 February 1970. Midway was at once one of the oldest and newest carriers in the fleet accomplishing, the most extensive modernization ever completed on a naval vessel from 11 February 1966 to 31 January 1970, decommissioning on 15 February 1966. For nearly four (4) years Midway was cut, torn, cannibalized, soldered, insulated, ventilated, welded, enlarged, strengthened, scaffolded, painted, reamed, extruded, ridiculed, cursed, praised, studied, and was the ugly duckling of the Hunters Point Shipyard. She became many things to many people; a monumental undertaking for the shipyard commander, a source of employment for thousands of shipyard personnel, a source of income for civilian contractors, a source of concern for appropriation committees, an unsurpassed challenge for ship design specialists, background scenery in the movie "Bullitt" and an uncharted navigational reference point for commercial airline pilots flying into bay area airports. Her increased capabilities included the enlargement of her flight deck from 2.82 acres to 4.02 acres plus the addition of three new deck-edge elevators and the new catapults on the bow and three arresting gear engines and one barricade were installed and re-arranged to accommodate a change of 12 degrees to the angle deck. The smaller waist catapult was removed since it was ineffective in launching the now heavier aircraft. Modern electronic systems were installed, central chilled water air conditioning system replaced hundreds of individual units, and Midway became the first ship to have the aviation fueling system completely converted from aviation gas to JP-5.

 

Midway also sorted the largest, most complex avionics shop in the fleet, the computerized Naval Tactical Data System and many improvements to habitability. During modernization Midway’s flight deck was increased by about 1.25 acres, the waist catapult was removed and two high performance C-13 catapults were installed on the bow, the Navy Tactical Data System was installed, 3 new heavy duty deck edge elevators were added, aircraft maintenance facilities improved, air-conditioning was installed throughout most of the ship, crew living spaces were improved and nearly every system on board was re-done. The basic hull design and the engineering plant are about all that now remain of the "pre-modernization" Midway. The year 1970 was one of transition, training and preparation for Midway and her 2500 man crew. There was much to be learned and much to improve upon to home man and machine into an effective fighting unit, capable of assuming her place as an integral part of the Pacific Fleet. The effort having encountered delays and massive cost overruns. In addition, the modifications significantly reduced the ship’s sea-keeping capabilities and ability to conduct air operations in rough seas. Additional modifications partially corrected these problems. Midway’s cost overruns and delays caused cancellation of a similar modernization for USS Coral Sea (CV-43)” (Ref. 1178-G, 1180A, 1180B, 1181N, 1183 & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) delays caused partially by the simultaneous construction of USS Horne (DLG/CG-30), modernization of USS Chicago (CA-29), and unscheduled repairs to the fire-damaged USS Oriskany (CVA-34) drove the initial modernization estimate of 87 million dollars to 202 million dollars” (Ref. 1181N).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) gained 13,000 tons to her weight as compared to her original full load figure and SCB-101 had been concluded with the exception of her final renovation from 1 February to 15 June 1970” (Ref. 1176A, 1176G, 1176I, 1181N & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) underwent her final renovation before going to her new forward deployed home from 1 February to 15 June 1970, conducting SCB-101 at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay from 11 February 1966 to 31 January 1970 and recommissioned a second time on 31 January 1970, with Captain Eugene J. Carroll Jr. assuming command at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard. Midway departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California and entered San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard on 11 February 1966 for extensive modernization” (Ref. 1180A, 1180B, 1181N, 1181O, 1183 & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) ship's force conducted Dock Trials at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay from 14 to 15 February 1970.  The trials were very successful in that relatively inexperienced Engineering and Deck Departments exercised at near underway conditions. The training accomplished greatly increased ship's force ability to meet the upcoming Fast Cruise and Builders Trials requirements” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) conducted Fast Cruise at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay from 27 February to 1 March 1970. The results of the Fast Cruise were positive in many ways but many discrepancies were discovered in systems which were exercised extensively for the first time. Incomplete installations and testing of systems, particularly in the Air, Weapons, and Deck Departments hampered training in these areas and necessitated simulating associated training activities” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) conducted a second Fast Cruise at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay on 14 March 1970” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) departed Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay at 0700 on 17 March 1970, for Builders Trials off the coast of northern California in COMWESTERN SEA FRONTIER OP-AREA W-260. Midway underway for the first time in more than four (4) years. The preceding day three helos from Helicopter Composite Squadron One (HC-1) Detachment Seven (DET-7) landed on borrad Midway while she was alongside the pier at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard. This marked the first aircraft landings on Midway since recommissioning” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) returned to Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay on 20 March 1970, conducting Builders Trials off the coast of northern California in COMWESTERN SEA FRONTIER OP-AREA W-260 from 17 to 20 March 1970. Midway’s first underway pperiiod in more than four (4) years. On 16 March 1970, three helos from Helicopter Composite Squadron One (HC-1) Detachment Seven (DET-7) landed on borrad Midway while she was alongside the pier at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard. This marked the first aircraft landings on Midway since recommissioning. During Builders Trials favorable performance was obtained from the Main Propulsion Plant as it handled the full power run, crash back full astern and crash ahead full with no major problems. Steering during the full power ahead and astern was entirely satisfactory. Previously known discrepancies were confirmed during the trials, particularly discrepancies in the area of weapons systems, various radars, auxiliary systems and the JP-5 system. It was great to see number 41 underway again but it was apparent that much work was still required in order for the ship to be ready for INSURV” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

“On 29 March 1970, a combined Easter service was held onboard as the men and families of' USS Midway (CV-41), the USS Providence (CL-82) and the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard joined in prayer and song with music provided by "The Covenant Four"” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

USS Midway (CV-41) conducted Fast Cruise at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay from 27 February to 1 March 1970. The results of the Fast Cruise were positive in many ways but many discrepancies were discovered in systems which were exercised extensively for the first time. Incomplete installations and testing of systems, particularly in the Air, Weapons, and Deck Departments hampered training in these areas and necessitated simulating associated training activities” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) conducted a second Fast Cruise at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay on 14 March 1970” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) departed Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay at 0700 on 17 March 1970, for Builders Trials off the coast of northern California in COMWESTERN SEA FRONTIER OP-AREA W-260. Midway underway for the first time in more than four (4) years. The preceding day three helos from Helicopter Composite Squadron One (HC-1) Detachment Seven (DET-7) landed on borrad Midway while she was alongside the pier at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard. This marked the first aircraft landings on Midway since recommissioning” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) returned to Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay on 20 March 1970, conducting Builders Trials off the coast of northern California in COMWESTERN SEA FRONTIER OP-AREA W-260 from 17 to 20 March 1970. Midway’s first underway pperiiod in more than four (4) years. On 16 March 1970, three helos from Helicopter Composite Squadron One (HC-1) Detachment Seven (DET-7) landed on borrad Midway while she was alongside the pier at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard. This marked the first aircraft landings on Midway since recommissioning. During Builders Trials favorable performance was obtained from the Main Propulsion Plant as it handled the full power run, crash back full astern and crash ahead full with no major problems. Steering during the full power ahead and astern was entirely satisfactory. Previously known discrepancies were confirmed during the trials, particularly discrepancies in the area of weapons systems, various radars, auxiliary systems and the JP-5 system. It was great to see number 41 underway again but it was apparent that much work was still required in order for the ship to be ready for INSURV” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

“On 29 March 1970, a combined Easter service was held onboard as the men and families of' USS Midway (CV-41), the USS Providence (CL-82) and the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard joined in prayer and song with music provided by "The Covenant Four"” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

USS Midway (CV-41) departed and returned to Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay on 23 April 1970, conducting Preliminary acceptance trials off the coast of northern California in COMWESTERN SEA FRONTIER OP-AREA W-260 from 23 to 24 April 1970” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) departed Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay on 27 April 1970, for Underway Trials, with the President of the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) Rear Admiral Bulkely and his many board members embarked” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) returned to Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay on 30 April 1970, conducting Underway Trials. Rear Admiral Bulkely, the President of the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) inspected, discussed, measured, evaluated and in general subjected Midway to the type scrutiny that can only be done by an INSURV Board from 27 to 30 April 1970. When it was over RADM Bulkkeley reported that Midway was considered to be one of the finest carriers his board had inspected in recent years. Although there were still required tests that were unaccomplished and some discrepancies existed, accomplishment of every event on the rigorous trial agenda without a significant engineering casualty attested to the basic quality of the new Midway. The magnitude of the corrective action required as result of INSURV made it clear that not all work could be accomplished prior to Midway’s scheduled departure from the shipyard in June.  The emphasis was placed upon the satisfactory completion of tests and corrective actions which, if not accomplished would degrade Midway’s summer Shakedown Period” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) departed Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay for homeport, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 15 June 1970 and the same day, Commandant of the Twelfth Naval District accepts delivery of Midway from Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, reporting to Commander in Chief, U. S. Pacific Fleet for duty in-the Naval Air Force, Pacific Fleet with the completion of the Fitting Out Period and prepared for a summer of training. Since Midway’s departure from NAS Alameda, California on 11 February 1966, SCB-101 at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay was conducted from 11 February 1966 to 31 January 1970 and Midway was recommissioned a second time on 31 January 1970, with Captain Eugene J. Carroll Jr. assuming command at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard. Midway departed for Naval Air Station, Alameda, California and entered San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard on 11 February 1966 for extensive modernization where she was decommisioned on 15 October 1966. Midway underwent her final renovation before going to her new forward deployed home, conducting Dock Trials at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard from 14 to 15 February 1970; Fast Cruise conducted at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard from 27 February to 1 March 1970; Second Fast Cruise Conducted at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard on 14 March 1970

 

Midway underway for the first time in more than four (4) years, Builders Trials conducted off the coast of northern California in COMWESTERN SEA FRONTIER OP-AREA W-260 from 17 to 20 March 1970; conducted Preliminary acceptance trials off the coast of northern California in COMWESTERN SEA FRONTIER OP-AREA W-260 from 23 to 24 April 1970. Midway conducted Underway Trials. Midway is presented to the President of the Board of Inspection and Survey, RADM Bulkkeley from 27 to 30 April 1970, returning  to Hunters Point Naval Shipyard wwhere she remained until departure” (Ref. 1178-G, 1180A, 1180B, 1181N, 1183 & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

Midway also sorted the largest, most complex avionics shop in the fleet, the computerized Naval Tactical Data System and many improvements to habitability. The year 1970 was one of transition, training and preparation for Midway and her 2500 man crew. There was much to be learned and much to improve upon to home man and machine into an effective fighting unit, capable of assuming her place as an integral part of the Pacific Fleet. The effort having encountered delays and massive cost overruns. In addition, the modifications significantly reduced the ship’s sea-keeping capabilities and ability to conduct air operations in rough seas. Additional modifications partially corrected these problems. Midway’s cost overruns and delays caused cancellation of a similar modernization for USS Coral Sea (CV-43)” (Ref. 1180A, 1180B, 1181N & 1183).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) delays caused partially by the simultaneous construction of USS Horne (DLG/CG-30), modernization of USS Chicago (CA-29), and unscheduled repairs to the fire-damaged USS Oriskany (CVA-34) drove the initial modernization estimate of 87 million dollars to 202 million dollars” (Ref. 1181N).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) gained 13,000 tons to her weight as compared to her original full load figure” (Ref. 1176A, 1176G, 1176I & 1181N).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) underwent her final renovation before going to her new forward deployed home, serving as a forward deployed unit of the Seventh Fleet from 11 February 1966 to 31 January 1970” (Ref. 1181O).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) departed San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard for Naval Air Station Alameda, California, making preparations once introduced to Commander, Carrier Air Wing Sixteen (CVW-16) (tail code (AH)) for operations at sea conducting carrier qualifications the remainder of 1970” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California in September 1970, for dry-dock at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) was Dry-docked at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay from 1 to 24 November 1970” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) conducted Fast Cruise at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay from 5 to 6 December 1970” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) returned to Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay on 10 December 1970, conducting Post Shakedown Availability Sea Trials off the coast of northern California in OP- AREA -260 from 8 to 10 December 1970, in port at thhe shipyard from late September or 1 November 1970 to 8 December 1970” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) departed Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay on 3 January 1971, for Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, conducting Post Shakedown Availability Sea Trials off the coast of northern California in OP-AREA-260 from 8 to 10 December 1970, returning to the shipyard upon conclusión, in port at shipyard from arrival from her home port in late September or 1 November 1970 to 8 December 1970 and 10 December to 3 January 1971, Dry-docked at from 1 to 24 November 1970, conducting Fast Cruise at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay from 5 to 6 December 1970. The shipyard's work package had already been planned as had the Ship's Force Overhaul and Management System (SFOMS) which programmed the Ship's Force share of the work to be accomplished while in the shipyard. Through close coordination between the shipyard and the ship a tremendous amount of work was accomplished by the end of the year. Midway now looked forward to 1971, the arrival of her Air Wing (CVW-5) and Seventh Fleet Operations. The Midway was recommissioned on 31 January 1970. The most comprehensive ship modernization ever undertaken by the United States Navy was initiated for the purpose of providing an attack carrier with similar capabilities to CVA’s of the Forrestal class and above. Midway flight deck area was nearly doubled from 2.82 to 4.02 acres; two high performance catapults were installed and numerous other projects were completed and tested prior to the end of 1970. Nineteen Seventy-One, however, was the year that would test this new capability and the crew that sailed her. Initially the Fleet Training Group at San Diego observed the ship with only ship’s company aboard. Carrier Air Wing FIVE then joined Midway and air operations commenced in earnest” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1970 & 1971).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) remained inactive, as the ship adopted "cold iron" status at NAS Alameda, California from 7 November to 6 December 1971” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1972).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) proceeded across the San Francisco Bay to Hunters Point Naval Shipyard for an eight week Restricted Availability Period (RAV) and to start again the process of preparing for deployment on 6 December 1971. The history of the Midway - 1971 is primarily that of over four thousand crew members doing their particular job to the best of their ability. The Medical Department, for example conducted 473 surgical procedures while Dental instituted a dependents health program in addition to its normal support of the crew. Supply dispersed over 14 million dollars to crewmembers and still had tine to special order and deliver 200 Japanese motorcycles to the ship. The Deck Department engaged in 80 underway replenishments, without an incident or personal injury and the Air Wing, Air Department and Air Operations teamed up to compile 8,087 arrested landings. The year 1971 was a performance year for Midway. Having been deployed for 204 days the ship and Air Wing accounted for over five thousand sorties against the enemy, Midway’s reason for being” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1972).

 

January 1, 1972 found USS Midway (CVA-41) undergoing Restricted Availability Period (RAV) in Hunters Point Naval Shipyard. Ship's company and shipyard personnel were well on the way to completing the refurbishment of the ship in preparation for its return to “WestPac” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1972).

 

“Commandant 11th Naval District awards USS Midway (CVA-41) Project Handclasp award Plaque for outstanding services rendered on 6 January 1972” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for calendar year 1972).

 

“Commemorative service held for late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) on 14 January 1972” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for calendar year 1972).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) conducted a Fast Cruise with no major problems encountered from 29 to 30 January 1972” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1972).

 

 

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) departed Hunters Point Naval Shipyard to conduct Sea Trials on 3 February 1972, with Midway returning to Alameda upon completion the following day, conducting Restricted Availability Period (RAV) in Hunters Point Naval Shipyard from 1 January to 3 February 1972. Ship's company and shipyard personnel completed the refurbishment of the ship in preparation for its return to “WestPac.” Commandant 11th Naval District awards Midway Project Handclasp award Plaque for outstanding services rendered on 6 January 1972. Commemorative service held for late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. aboard Midway on 14 January 1972. Midway conducted a Fast Cruise with no major problems encountered from 29 to 30 January 1972” (Ref. 1181N & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1972).

USS Midway (CVA-41) remained in Cold Iron status at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 9 to 30 March 1973, when she moved across San Francisco Bay to Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

“During the yard period, Chief of Staff Naval Air Force Pacific Fleet visited USS Midway (CVA-41) on 20 April 1973” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

“The Material Officer, Naval Air Force Pacific Fleet and Commander Carrier Division One visited USS Midway (CVA-41) on 1 June 1973” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) held a "Fast Cruise" at Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay from 15 to 16 June 1973” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) departed Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco, CA. on 18 June 1973, to begin Sea Trials, returning to Hunter's Point on 19 June” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) departed Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco, CA. on 25 June 1973, to perform Independent Steaming Exercises off Northern California” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) returned to Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco, CA. on 25 June 1973, concluding Overhaul from 30 March to 25 June 1973,  conducting Independent Steaming Exercises off Northern California from 25 to 29 June 1973, conducting Sea Trials from 18 to 19 June 1973, preceded by a "Fast Cruise" at the , San Francisco, CA. from 15 to 16 June 1973. During the yard period, Chief of Staff Naval Air Force Pacific Fleet visited Midway on 20 April 1973 and again with Commander Carrier Division One on 1 June 1973. Midway (CVA-41) remained in cold iron at Alameda from 8 to 30 March 1973, when she moved across San Francisco, CA. for overhaul” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).