CHAPTER XXXV to XXXVI and Refresher Training in the Sea of Japan

(18 October 1974 to 30 March 1975)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw - 24 April 1980

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 1980)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2019)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  of III (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

Book Vol. I of IV            ISBN: TBA                EBook Vol. I of IV

ISBN: 978-1-365-73794-7

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II of III

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III of III

(14 January 2010 to 31

December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

USS Coral Sea CV-42 CVB-43 CVA-43 and CV-43 History and Those Aircraft Carriers Operating with Coral Sea During Her Tour of Service CONSTRUCTION to LAUNCHING and EARLY JET AIRCRAFT DEVELOPMENT (10 July 1944—2 April 1946) and a Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

ISBN: 9781434382917

 

 

At sea in the Western Pacific, 30 November 1974. Good overhead showing stern of Midway after her 1966-1970 overhaul: note 3 deck-edge elevators, two to starboard (forward and abaft the island) and one to port. F-4s, A-6s, A-7s, E-2s and an SH-3 are shown on the flight deck - NS024105 - USN. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024105.jpg

 

Sixth deployment, as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, in the Western Pacific Region, conducting Operations in the Pacific Ocean, on her 11th “WestPac,” her 12th South China Sea, on her third Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise (18 October to 20 December 1974) and conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) (31 December 1974 to 11 January 1975). (18 October 1974 to 11 January 1975)

CHAPTER XXXV

 

 

    “Nine days after her warm reception with RADM Coogan, COMCARGRU-3, serving as Commander, Task Group, CTG-77.4 since 29 June 1974 assigned and CDR W. L. Chatham, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked USS Midway (CVA-41) departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 18 October 1974, with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her 11th “WestPac,” her 12th South China Sea, on her third Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her sixth deployment, as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, in the Western Pacific Region, conducting Operations in the Pacific Ocean, as a result of the anti-war, anti-nuclear weapons issue was being pushed aggressively by the -Leftist Parties in the Japanese Diet and headed for open ocean en route for the South China Sea, to particpate in Exercise MULTIPLEX 2-75, a large scale, 3-day War-at-Sea scenario exercise in the South China Sea. She will under go her eighth deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Stationin the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. She will under go her 14th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 24th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1974).    

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(18 October to 20 December 1974)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CVA-41) –7th (6th Forward Deployed)

Western

Pacific

Region

Pacific Ocean

11th WestPac

12th SCS

CVW-5

NF

18 Oct 1974

20 Dec 1974

Vietnam

24th FWFD

63-days

3rd Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise

Operations in the Pacific Ocean, as a result of the anti-war, anti-nuclear weapons issue was being pushed aggressively by the -Leftist Parties in the Japanese Diet and headed for open ocean en route for the South China Sea, to particpate in Exercise MULTIPLEX 2-75, a large scale, 3-day War-at-Sea scenario exercise in the South China Sea.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-93

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6A / A-6B

KA-6D

VMCJ-1 Det. 101

Golden Hawks - Marine fixed-wing squadron

McDonnell-Douglas  - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RM)   600

RF-4B

VMCJ-1 Det. 101

Golden Hawks - Marine fixed-wing squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(RM)   610

EA-6A

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye -Electronics

010

E-2B

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

002-007

SH-3G

*VQ-l Det.

World Watchers - Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior -

Jet Attack - Special electronic installation

 

EA-3B

*not embarked for the entire deployment

 

    “After gathering up the Air Wing in 8-116, the USS Midway (CVA-41) headed south for the Luzon Straits. Typhoon Delia was also headed for the Luzon Straits and, since the Midway’s arrival time at the Straits was estimated to be the same as for Typhoon Della, Midway changed course to enter the South China Sea through the San Bernardino Strait.

 

      USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived in the Subic Operating Area on 25 October 1974.

 

      October 1974 is demonstration month in Japan. USS Midway (CVA-41) presence was accepted by most Japanese and a great deal of public relations work by all hands from CAPT Schulte to the newest seaman had been expended to make home porting in Yokosuka a success. During this October, the anti-war, anti-nuclear weapons issue was being pushed aggressively by the -Leftist Parties in the Japanese Diet. Much of the furor was domestic politicking but Midway, as a highly visible symbol of American military power and nuclear deterrent, became a political hot potato” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1974).

 

    “On 28 October 1974 the Midway CTG 77.4 Task Group formed up and steamed out of the Subic OPAREA to evade Typhoon Elaine. By the morning of 29 October the danger from Elaine was over and USS Midway (CVA-41) headed for a three day port call at Alava Pier, Subic Bay, R. P. arriving on 30 October 1974.

 

      USS Midway (CVA-41) with RADM Coogan, COMCARGRU-3, duties of Commander of CTG 77.4 Task Group and CVW-5 embarked left Alava Pier, Subic Bay, R. P. at 1730H, 1 November 1974 for two weeks of intensive air operations in the Subic OPAREA” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1974 & 405).

 

    “After four days of operations, USS Midway (CVA-41) CTG 77.4 Task Group formed up and steamed south to evade Typhoon Gloria and by the 8th of November 1974 operations were re-commenced.

 

      Further operations were not disturbed by typhoons and on 13 November the USS Midway (CVA-41) CTG 77.4 Task Group, the Enterprise Task Group and a group of TF 75 ships commenced Exercise MULTIPLEX 2-75, a large scale, 3-day War-at-Sea scenario exercise in the South China Sea” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1974).

 

    USS Midway (CVA-41) re-entered Subic Bay, R. P. on 15 November 1974 for a ten day visit and SRA period.

 

      On 25 November 1974, USS Midway (CVA-41) departed Subic Bay, R. P., inport from 15 to 25 November 1974 and headed back to the Subic OPAREA for five days of operations prior to departing en route to Hong Kong” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1974 & 405).

 

    USS Midway (CVA-41) headed back to the Subic OPAREA for five days of operations prior to departing en route to Hong Kong on 30 November 1974” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1974).

 

 

At sea in the Western Pacific, 30 November 1974. Good overhead showing stern of Midway after her 1966-1970 overhaul: note 3 deck-edge elevators, two to starboard (forward and abaft the island) and one to port. F-4s, A-6s, A-7s, E-2s and an SH-3 are shown on the flight deck. NS024105. USN. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024105.jpg

 

    “Typhoon Irma was already en route Hong Kong via Hainan Island and, since the typhoon was scheduled to arrive at about the same time as Subic Bay, R. P., USS Midway (CVA-41) SOA was slowed. By arrival in Hong Kong, British Crown Colony on 2 December 1974, Typhoon Irma had become a tropical storm but the ship’s late arrival and high winds delayed crew liberty until 3 December 1974” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1974 & 405).

 

    “As calendar year 1974 drew to a close, USS Midway (CVA-41) left Hong Kong, British Crown Colony on 9 December 1974 and once again took part in a Blue Sky Exercise. High ranking Republic of China military personnel flew aboard on 10 December 1974, to observe the exercise. The weather was marginal which prohibited a full launch of raids from the Midway and did not permit ROCAF strikes on the Midway spar” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1974 & 405).

 

    “After the Blue Sky Exercise, USS Midway (CVA-41) headed north for operations off Okinawa from 11 to 18 December 1974 and an air defense exercise with the U. S. Air Force (Exercise Commando Diamond) flying from bases in Korea and Okinawa on the 16th” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1974).

 

    On 20 December 1974, USS Midway (CVA-41) RADM Coogan, COMCARGRU-3, serving as Commander, Task Group, CTG-77.4 since 29 June 1974 assigned and CDR W. L. Chatham, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived back in homeport of Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) in time for those with families to enjoy the holiday season, with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her 11th “WestPac,” her 12th South China Sea, on her third Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her sixth deployment, as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, in the Western Pacific Region Operations in the Pacific Ocean, as a result of the anti-war, anti-nuclear weapons issue was being pushed aggressively by the -Leftist Parties in the Japanese Diet and headed for open ocean en route for the South China Sea, to participate in Exercise MULTIPLEX 2-75, a large scale, 3-day War-at-Sea scenario exercise in the South China Sea. Nine days after her warm reception at Yokosuka, Midway departed 19 October 1974 as a result of the anti-war, anti-nuclear weapons issue was being pushed aggressively by the -Leftist Parties in the Japanese Diet and headed for open ocean en route for the South China Sea. After gathering up the Air Wing in 8-116, the Midway headed south for the Luzon Straits. Typhoon Delia was also headed for the Luzon Straits and, since the Midway’s arrival time at the Straits was estimated to be the same as for Typhoon Della, Midway changed course to enter the South China Sea through the San Bernardino Strait. Midway arrived in the Subic Operating Area on 25 October 1974. October 1974 is demonstration month in Japan. Midway presence was accepted by most Japanese and a great deal of public relations work by all hands from CAPT Schulte to the newest seaman had been expended to make home porting in Yokosuka a success. During this October, the anti-war, anti-nuclear weapons issue was being pushed aggressively by the -Leftist Parties in the Japanese Diet. Much of the furor was domestic politicking but Midway, as a highly visible symbol of American military power and nuclear deterrent, became a political hot potato. On 28 October 1974 the Midway CTG 77.4 Task Group formed up and steamed out of the Subic OPAREA to evade Typhoon Elaine. By the morning of 29 October the danger from Elaine was over and Midway headed for a three day port call at Alava Pier, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines. arriving on 30 October 1974. Midway with RADM Coogan, COMCARGRU-3, Commander of CTG 77.4 Task Group and CVW-5 embarked left Alava Pier, Subic Bay, R. P. at 1730H, 1 November 1974 for two weeks of intensive air operations in the Subic OPAREA. After four days of operations, Midway CTG 77.4 Task Group formed up and steamed south to evade Typhoon Gloria and by the 8th of November 1974 operations were re-commenced. Further operations were not disturbed by typhoons and on 13 November the USS Midway (CVA-41) CTG 77.4 Task Group, the Enterprise Task Group and a group of TF 75 ships commenced Exercise MULTIPLEX 2-75, a large scale, 3-day War-at-Sea scenario exercise in the South China Sea. Midway re-entered Subic Bay, R. P. on 15 November 1974 for a ten day visit and SRA period from 15 to 25 November 1974 and headed back to the Subic OPAREA for five days of operations prior to departing en route to Hong Kong. Midway headed back to the Subic OPAREA for five days of operations prior to departing en route to Hong Kong on 30 November 1974. Typhoon Irma was already en route Hong Kong via Hainan Island and, since the typhoon was scheduled to arrive at about the same time as Subic Bay, R. P., Midway SOA was slowed. By arrival in Hong Kong, British Crown Colony on 2 December 1974, Typhoon Irma had become a tropical storm but the ship’s late arrival and high winds delayed crew liberty until 3 December 1974. As calendar year 1974 drew to a close, Midway left Hong Kong on 9 December 1974 and once again took part in a Blue Sky Exercise. High ranking Republic of China military personnel flew aboard on 10 December 1974, to observe the exercise. The weather was marginal which prohibited a full launch of raids from the Midway and did not permit ROCAF strikes on the Midway spar. “After the Blue Sky Exercise, USS Midway (CVA-41) headed north for operations off Okinawa from 11 to 18 December 1974 and an air defense exercise with the U. S. Air Force (Exercise Commando Diamond) flying from bases in Korea and Okinawa on the 16th. Ports of calls included: Alava Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines twice and Hong Kong, situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VMCJ-1 Det. 101, RF-4B; VMCJ-1 Det. 101, EA-6A; VAW-115, E-2B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. Her eighth deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Stationin the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. Her 14th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 24th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (18 October to 20 December 1974)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1974).

 

    “RADM Coogan, COMCARGRU-3 and his staff departed USS Midway (CVA-41) on 21 December 1974 and the duties of as Commander, Task Group CTG-77.4 in the Western Pacific Region were assumed by RADM James C. Donaldson, Jr., COMFAIRWESTPAC; RADM Coogan, COMCARGRU-3 serving from 30 June to 21 December 1974.

 

      On 1 January 1975, USS Midway (CVA-41) was inport at Yokosuka, Japan, with Captain R. J. SCHULTE PERFORMING THE DUTIES OF Commander Task Group 77.

 

     USS Midway (CVA-41) conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 22 December 1974 to 11 January 1975” (Ref. USS Midway (CVA-41) 1975 Command History Report).

 

USS MIDWAY (CVA-41) 1974 YEARS END SUMMARY

CHAPTER XXXV

Appendix I

 

 

COMMAND ORGANIZATION

 

             1.  CAPTAIN R. J. Schulte, USN, 1310, Commanding from 1 January 1974 to 31 December 1974.

 

             2.  The USS Midway (CVA-41) was homeported at U. S. Naval Base Yokosuka, Japan during all of calendar year 1974. Both the Midway and embarked Air Wing (CVW-5) observed the one year anniversary as the only Forward Deployed CVA/Air Wing on 5 October 1974. The mission and function of the ship did not change during 1974.

 

USS MIDWAY (CVA-41) 1974 Special Topics:

 

1.  Operations Department

 

             The most noteworthy event in the Operations Department during 1974 was accomplished by Combat Information Center. CIC successfully detected, tracked, and controlled 113 intercepts of Soviet aircraft while the CVA was operating in the Sea of Japan.  In June, the Operations Department participated in Refresher Training which, for the first time in history, was completed by a carrier in WESTPAC. In July, CIC received the COMNAVAIRPAC Green “E” for excellence among the Pacific Fleet Carriers.

 

             In order to obtain a more complete surface picture, another DRT was obtained from Air operations and installed in CIC.

 

             Personnel shortages in CIC continued to be a major problem area.  Some rates such as air controllers are still undermanned with no relief in sight. Although some rates are still critically short, steps have been taken to correct these deficiencies by utilizing maximum time for on-the-job training.

 

             During the year, the AN/SPN-43A Marshall Radar was installed and the AN/SPN-6 the channel “A” antenna pedestal on the AN/SPN-10 was removed and the ACLS radar was replaced. The AN/UPR-2 Ionospheric Sounder and the AN/WPN-5 LORAN “C” were also installed. Field Changes 16, 17 and 18 were installed in the SINS in conjunction with gimbal bearing and inductosyn replacement. Installation commenced on the AIMS MK XII IFF system and the AN/SPN-41 ILS system.

 

2.  Engineering Department

 

             During 1974 several ship alterations were worked in the engineering spaces including installation of AFFF stations in the engine rooms and fluorescent lighting in many of the main spaces. New units were installed in place of number 6 and 7 fire pumps and turbines and some cables were installed for a high level bilge alarm system.

 

             The ship was dry docked on 6 September 1974 at Yokosuka, Japan. While in dock the tail shaft and propeller on number 1, 2 and 3 main engines were replaced and the strut bearing on number 1 main shaft was reworked. The ship undocked on 24 September, 1974.

 

During 1974 the following totals were recorded:

 

Fuel Oil consumed

22,878,466 Gal

Feed and fresh water distilled

56,258,271 Gal

Miles steamed

57,710.4 NAUTICAL MILES

Liquid oxygen made

21,502 Gal

 

3.  Air Department

 

             Number of Catapult/Free Deck launches:

 

JAN-MAR

2,778

APR-JUN

3,431

JUL-SEP

2,170

OCT-DEC

2,373

TOTAL

10,752

 

             Number of Arrested Landings:

 

JAN-MAR

2850

APR-JUN

3,386

JUL-SEP

2,143

OCT-DEC

2,344

TOTAL

10,683

 

             JP-5 Issued in Gallons:

 

JAN

965,100

JUL

553,986

FEB

2,713,389

AUG

1,824,198

MAR

395,860

SEP

643,435

APR

1,270,220

OCT

839,324

MAY

740,433

NOV

1,669,146

JUN

1,447,525

DEC

1,157,214

TOTAL

 

 

13,067,830

 

4. Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department

 

             During 1974, 26,573 aircraft components were processed for repair, 19,022 were returned to supply for issue (RF1) and 7,721 were rejected as beyond capability of maintenance (BMC).  The ship’s assigned C-1A logged 4,642.5 flight hours and 641 landings of which 77 were arrested carrier landings.

 

5.  Communications Department

 

             Message traffic volume in 1974 reached a total of 255,856 received and 61,121 sent.  The highest traffic totals were recorded in February as a result of operations in the Subic OPAREA. A total of 21,520 messages were processed. The Sea of Japan operations had a smaller effect on traffic totals with the second largest monthly total of 16,715 messages processed.

 

6.  Weapons Department

 

             The following ordnance expenditures were made during 1974:

 

NAME

QUANTITY

5”/54 projectiles

618

Mk 82 500 lb bombs

2261

Mk 83 1000 lb bombs

815

Mk 84 2000 lb bombs

24

Mk 45 paraflares

1227

Chaff countermeasures

3840

Mk 76 practice bombs

3785

Mk 106 practice bombs

370

AIM-7E Sparrow missiles

3

AIM-7E-2 Sparrow III missiles

1

AIM 9H Sidewinder missiles

2

AIM 9G Sidewinder missiles

3

AIM 9B Sidewinder missiles

7

Mk 84 Inert 2000 lb bombs

8

20 MM cartridge, practice

1568

20 MM cartridge, linked

280

 

7.  Deck/Navigation Department

 

             During 1974 MIDWAY accomplished 50 replenishment evolutions of which five were Vertrep’s and 45 were Conrep’s.

 

8.  Medical Department

 

Outpatient visits

27,090

Inpatient visits

39

Laboratory tests

20,655

Pulmonary Function Studies

14

Audiograms

1,521

EEG’s

283

Pharmacy units

27,496

X-Ray Film exposures

6,237

Refractions

545

Spectacles ordered

1,005

Total physical examinations

2,424

Surgical procedures

108

Total V. D. cases

1,472

 

9.  Executive Department

 

             There were no major changes in the structure or equipage of the Executive Department in 1974. Thru the year the ship had 852 personnel gains and 983 losses. Educational programs aboard Midway grew in 1974. Approximately 535 GED (General Educational Development) tests were given. 576 CLEP (College Level Education Program) tests, used by civilian institutions to grant college credits to entering students, were administered. A High School Diploma Program, Pre-Discharge Educational Program (PREP) had 90 students enrolled during 1974. 607 students were enrolled in college courses given aboard Midway through the Program Afloat College Education (PACE) Program. In professional qualifications, 647 advancements were recorded and 12 personnel were frocked to pay grade E-7.

 

Seventh deployment, as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, in the Western Pacific Region, conducting Operations in the Pacific Ocean, conducting Operations in the Pacific Ocean, for Refresher Operations in the south eastern Japan operating area (R-116); 13th South China Sea deployment, on her fourth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise (13 January to 18 February 1975); conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) (19 February to 9 March 1975); Operations in the Pacific Ocean, with four days of Refresher Training in the Sea of Japan, participating in the exercise for the “Hot Wash-up” of READEX 1-75 (10 to 20 March 1975) and conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) inport at Piedmont pier (21 to 30 March 1975) (13 January to 30 March 1975)

CHAPTER XXXVI

 

 

     “USS Midway (CVA-41) with RADM James C. Donaldson, Jr., COMFAIRWESTPAC, arriving on 12 January 1975, serving as Commander, Task Group CTG-77.4 since 21 December 1974 and CDR W. L. Chatham, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 13 January 1975, with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her first deployment of 1975 out of Japanese Waters, on her 13th South China Sea deployment, her fourth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her seventh deployment, as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, in the Western Pacific Region, conducting Operations in the Pacific Ocean, for Refresher Operations in the south eastern Japan operating area (R-116). She will under go her ninth deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Stationin the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. She will under go her 15th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 25th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & USS Midway (CVA-41) 1974/75 Command History Report).   

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(13 January to 18 February 1975)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CVA-41) –7th (7th Forward Deployed)

Western

Pacific

Region

Pacific Ocean

south eastern Japan

Region

13th SCS

CVW-5

NF

13 Jan 1975

18 Feb 1975

Vietnam

25th FWFD

38-days

4th Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise

Operations in the Pacific Ocean, for Refresher Operations in the south eastern Japan operating area (R-116); conducted antiaircraft and antisubmarine warfare operations; ten days of intensive air operations in preparation for READEX 1-75, a large scale, 3-day, war-at-sea exercise in the South China Sea, with the USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Task Group and a group of Task Force 75 ships.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-93

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6A / A-6B     KA-6D

VMCJ-1 Det. 101

Golden Hawks - Marine fixed-wing squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter – Reconnaissance

(RM)   600

RF-4B

VMCJ-1 Det. 101

Golden Hawks - Marine fixed-wing squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(RM)   610

EA-6A

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye -Electronics

010

E-2B

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

002-007

SH-3G

*VQ-l Det.

World Watchers  - Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior -

 Jet Attack - Special electronic installation

 

EA-3B

*VMAQ-2 Det.

Marine Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(CY) 620

EA-6B

*VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps – Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF)  610

RF-4B

*not embarked for the entire deployment

 

     “USS Worden (CG-18) joined up with USS Midway (CVA-41) as part of her task force” (Ref. 84A).

 

     “USS Worden (DLG-18) departed the naval ship repair facility at Yokosuka, Japan on 13 January 1975 en route to Subic Bay Philippines” (Ref. 1438). 

 

     “After three days of Refresher Operations in the south eastern Japan operating area (R-116), RADM James C. Donaldson, Jr., COMFAIRWESTPAC, as Commander Task Group 77.4 arriving USS Midway (CVA-41) on 12 January 1975 departed for W-173 and W-172 adjacent to Okinawa on or about the 16 January 1975.

 

      After a short period of flight operations, USS Midway (CVA-41) transit to the Subic area resumed on 20 January 1975” (Ref. USS Midway (CVA-41) 1975 Command History Report).

 

     “Air operations were conducted en route with the air wing fly-off USS Midway (CVA-41) on the evening of 22 January and morning of 23 January 1975, mooring at Alava pier, Subic Bay, Philippines on 23 January 1975 for a ten day visit and Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) period, conducting her fourth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405 & USS Midway (CVA-41) 1975 Command History Report).

 

     “On 27 January 1975, CDR L. H. Grimes relieved CAPT C. W. Roe as Executive Officer of the USS Midway (CVA-41). CDR Grimes had been the Operations Officer for the preceding twenty months” (Ref. USS Midway (CVA-41) 1975 Command History Report).

 

     “USS Worden (CG-18) arrived on 27 January 1975 for a week at Subic Bay Philippines, departing the naval ship repair facility at Yokosuka on 13 January 1975 en route to Subic Bay Philippines. During this two-week at-sea period, she conducted antiaircraft and antisubmarine warfare operations with USS Midway (CVA-41)” (Ref. 1438).

 

     “USS Midway (CVA-41) departed Alava pier, Subic Bay, Philippines on 2 February 1975, inport from 23 January to 2 February 1975 conducting a Selected Restricted Availability (SRA), ten days of intensive air operations in preparation for READEX 1-75, a large scale, 3-day, war-at-sea exercise in the South China Sea will commence to continue her fourth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea. In conjunction with this work-up, an air defense exercise (New Boy) was conducted with the Thirteenth Air Force in the Philippines” (Ref. 405 & USS Midway (CVA-41) 1975 Command History Report).

 

     “Exercise READEX 1-75 took place during 12 to 14 February 1975, with the USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Task Group and a group of Task Force 75 ships. Upon completion of READEX 1-75, USS Midway (CVA-41) began the transit to Yokosuka, conducting daily flight operations en route” (Ref. USS Midway (CVA-41) 1975 Command History Report).

 

     “On 18 February 1975, USS Midway (CVA-41) with RADM James C. Donaldson, Jr., COMFAIRWESTPAC, arriving on 12 January 1975, serving as Commander, Task Group CTG-77.4 since 21 December 1974 and CDR W. L. Chatham, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) arrived Piedmont pier, Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, in the Western Pacific Region, conducting Operations in the Pacific Ocean, ending her first deployment of 1975 out of Japanese Waters, on her 13th South China Sea deployment, her fourth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her seventh deployment, conducting Refresher Operations in the south eastern Japan operating area (R-116); conducted antiaircraft and antisubmarine warfare operations; ten days of intensive air operations in preparation for READEX 1-75, a large scale, 3-day, war-at-sea exercise in the South China Sea, with the USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Task Group and a group of Task Force 75 ships. After three days of Refresher Operations in the south eastern Japan operating area (R-116), RADM James C. Donaldson, Jr., COMFAIRWESTPAC, as Commander Task Group 77.4 arriving Midway on 12 January 1975 departed for W-173 and W-172 adjacent to Okinawa on or about the 16 January 1975. After a short period of flight operations, Midway transit to the Subic area resumed on 20 January 1975. Air operations were conducted en route with the air wing fly-off aboard Midway on the evening of 22 January and morning of 23 January 1975, mooring at Alava pier, Subic Bay, Philippines on 23 January 1975 for a ten day visit and Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) period, conducting her fourth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea. On 27 January 1975, CDR L. H. Grimes relieved CAPT C. W. Roe as Executive Officer of the Midway. CDR Grimes had been the Operations Officer for the preceding twenty months. Midway departed Alava pier, Subic Bay, Philippines on 2 February 1975, inport from 23 January to 2 February 1975 conducting a SRA, followed by ten days of intensive air operations in preparation for READEX 1-75, a large scale, 3-day, war-at-sea exercise in the South China Sea will commence to continue her fourth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea. In conjunction with this work-up, an air defense exercise (New Boy) was conducted with the Thirteenth Air Force in the Philippines. Exercise READEX 1-75 commenced on 12 February 1975, Midway with the USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Task Group and a group of Task Force 75 ships. Exercise READEX 1-75 took place during 12 to 14 February 1975, with the USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Task Group and a group of Task Force 75 ships. Upon completion of READEX 1-75, Midway began the transit to Yokosuka, conducting daily flight operations en route. Ports of calls include: Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D, VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; *VMCJ-1 Det. 101, RF-4B & EA-6A; VAW-115, E-2B; HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G; *VQ-l Det., EA-3B; *VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B and *VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6B. *Not embarked for the entire deployment. USS Worden (CG-18) joined up with Midway as part of her task force. Her ninth deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Stationin the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. Her 15th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 25th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (13 January to 18 February 1975)(Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 84A, 1181O & USS Midway (CVA-41) 1974/75 Command History Report).

 

     “On 19 February 1975, VADM Steele, Commander SEVENTH Fleet, visited the USS Midway (CVA-41) along with the Seventh Fleet Task Force Commanders that participated in the exercise for the “Hot Wash-up” of READEX 1-75” (Ref. USS Midway (CVA-41) 1975 Command History Report).

 

     “USS Worden (DLG-18) participated in Operation "Readex" before returning to Yokosuka, Japan on 19 February 1975 and commenced a 20-day availability period” (Ref. 1438).

 

     “On 21 February 1975, USS Midway (CVA-41)) crewmen received their High School Diplomas in ceremonies onboard. Mr. W. F. Dalton, Director, Saint Louis High School, Japan, gave the commencement address.

 

      On 25 February 1975, the Japanese Military Security Advisory Association discussed various shipboard activities with Captain Schulte, Commanding Officer USS Midway (CVA-41), during their visit to USS Midway.

 

      USS Midway (CVA-41) conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 19 February to 9 March 1975” (Ref. Part I, Tab E, Annex A of USS Midway (CVA-41) 1975 Command History Report).

 

     “The next at-sea period for USS Midway (CVA-41) with RADM James C. Donaldson, Jr., COMFAIRWESTPAC, arriving on 12 January 1975, serving as Commander, Task Group CTG-77.4 since 21 December 1974 and CDR W. L. Chatham, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) commenced upon departure from Piedmont pier, Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) on 10 March 1975, with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet in the Western Pacific Region, conducting Operations in the Pacific Ocean, with four days of Refresher Training in the Sea of Japan” (Ref. USS Midway (CVA-41) 1975 Command History Report).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(10 to 20 March 1975)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CVA-41) –7th (Forward Deployed)

Western

Pacific

Region

Pacific Ocean

Sea of Japan

CVW-5

NF

10 Mar 1975

20 Mar 1975

Training

11-days

Operations in the Pacific Ocean, with four days of Refresher Training in the Sea of Japan and Prime Rate 75, a command post exercise testing the world wide military command and control system; Multplex 3-75, a war-at-sea scenario exercise and CVW-5 participated in an Autumn Flower exercise with the Japanese Self Defense Force.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-93

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6A / A-6B     KA-6D

VMCJ-1 Det. 101

Golden Hawks - Marine fixed-wing squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter – Reconnaissance

(RM)   600

RF-4B

VMCJ-1 Det. 101

Golden Hawks - Marine fixed-wing squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(RM)   610

EA-6A

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye -Electronics

010

E-2B

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

002-007

SH-3G

*VQ-l Det.

World Watchers  - Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior -

 Jet Attack - Special electronic installation

 

EA-3B

*VMAQ-2 Det.

Marine Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(CY) 620

EA-6B

*VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps – Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF)  610

RF-4B

*not embarked for the entire deployment

 

     “USS Worden (CG-18) conducted a 20-day Availability period at Piedmont pier, Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) on 19 February to 11 March 1975” (Ref. 1438).

 

     “On 11 March 1975, USS Worden (CG-18) got underway from Piedmont pier, Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) for 10 days of routine flight operations off Okinawa” (Ref. 1438).

 

     “During four days of Refresher Training, USS Midway (CVA-41) took part in Prime Rate 75, a command post exercise testing the world wide military command and control system. This exercise began on 3 March 1975 and carried over into three days of the at-sea period, ending on 14 March 1975.

 

      USS Midway (CVA-41) conducted Multplex 3-75, a war-at-sea scenario exercise, was conducted from 15 to 17 March 1975. On 17 March, Midway and CVW-5 participated in an Autumn Flower exercise with the Japanese Self Defense Force” (Ref. USS Midway (CVA-41) 1975 Command History Report).

 

     “On 20 March 1975, Regular air operations were conducted during the remainder of the at-sea period beginning on 15 March 1975, with the USS Midway (CVA-41) with RADM James C. Donaldson, Jr., COMFAIRWESTPAC, arriving on 12 January 1975, serving as Commander, Task Group CTG-77.4 since 21 December 1974 and CDR W. L. Chatham, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) returning to Piedmont pier, Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet in the Western Pacific Region, conducting Operations in the Pacific Ocean, During four days of Refresher Training in the Sea of Japan, During the 20 day inport period at Piedmont pier, Yokosuka, Japan from 18 to 28 February 1975, Midway underwent an Incremental Ship’s Repair Alongside (ISRA). On 19 February 1975, VADM Steele, Commander SEVENTH Fleet, visited the Midway along with the SEVENTH Fleet Task Force Commanders that participated in the exercise for the “Hot Wash-up” of READEX 1-75. Also during this period, the Government of Japan Military Security Advisory Association visited the Midway. Midway took part in Prime Rate 75, a command post exercise testing the world wide military command and control system. This exercise began on 3 March 1975 and carried over into three days of the at-sea period, ending on 14 March 1975. Midway conducted Multplex 3-75, a war-at-sea scenario exercise, was conducted from 15 to 17 March 1975. On 17 March, Midway and CVW-5 participated in an Autumn Flower exercise with the Japanese Self Defense Force. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D, VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; *VMCJ-1 Det. 101, RF-4B & EA-6A; VAW-115, E-2B; HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G; *VQ-l Det., EA-3B; *VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B and *VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6B. *Not embarked for the entire deployment. USS Worden (CG-18) joined up with Midway as part of her task force (10 to 20 March 1975)” (Ref. USS Midway (CVA-41) 1975 Command History Report).

 

     “USS Worden (DLG-18) returned to Piedmont pier, Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) on 21/22 March 1975 after 10 days of routine flight operations off Okinawa where she commenced upkeep and preparation for an upcoming cruise” (Ref. 1438).

 

     “RADM W. L. Harris, COMCARGRU SEVEN arrived aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) on 22 March 1975 and assumed the duties of Commander, Task Group CTG-77.4 in the Western Pacific Region, from RADM James C. Donaldson, Jr., COMFAIRWESTPAC, embarked USS Midway (CVA-41) as Commander Task Group 77.4 (12 January to 22 March 1975)” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1974).

 

 

     “On 24 March 1975, ten USS Midway (CVA-41) men finished their degree requirements through the Program Afloat College Education (PACE), offered aboard the Midway through Chapman College. This was the first college graduation to ever occur aboard a U. S. Naval Ship.

 

      On 25 March 1975, the Israeli Defense Attaché, Colonel A. Lubron visited the USS Midway (CVA-41). Here Captain Schulte greets Colonel Lubron” (Ref. Part I, Tab F, Annex A of USS Midway (CVA-41) 1975 Command History Report).

 

Refugees flee in anything that floats from the NVN.

 

     “Late in March 1975 and late in USS Blue Ridge (LCC-19) third WestPac, the military and political situation in Cambodia and South Vietnam had Blue Ridge's operational plans in confusion as it was in the late March 1972. The military advances of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia and the NVN proxies in South Vietnam were fore shadowing their eventual fate” (Ref. 1444).

 

     “On 25 March 1975, USS Worden (DLG-18) got underway from Yokosuka, Japan for Pusan, Korea, for a port visit, thence to Subic Bay, Philippines for operations. After completing operations, Worden headed for Thailand and a much awaited port visit” (Ref. 1438).

 

Catastrophic chain of events leading to the surrender of Da Nang

 

     “Marines coming aboard USS Blue Ridge (LCC-19) for Vietnam at White Beach, on 25 March 1975. Blue Ridge at White Beach, Okinawa: "He stated that when the battalion was alerted on 25 March 1975, "I was instructed that my company would be helolifted to White Beach at around 1400 for embarkation aboard the USS Blue Ridge.... for immediate departure to Da Nang where we would reinforce U.S. facilities. We did embark on 25 March...” (Ref. [31] of 1444).

 

     “Marines and sailors hastily trained to prepare for the anticipated mass of humanity. Crowd control, evacuation procedures, and a Vietnamese orientation course occupied the Marines' time on board ship. Counterintelligence personnel briefed Marines in the problems of identifying and neutralizing saboteurs, The interrogator-translator team gave a quick Vietnamese language orientation course, Key Navy and Marine Corps officers and senior enlisted men made walkthroughs of the evacuation chain, The versatile printing section on board the Blue Ridge reproduced thousands of signs in Vietnamese composed by the 17th ITF. Captain Bushey's counterintelligence team prepared a simplified instruction card for the small unit leader that included basic Vietnamese phrases and human relations oriented "do's and don'ts'” (Ref. [32] of 1444).

 

     “South Vietnam's "strategy": " the essence of South Vietnam's post-Accords military strategy: conserve resources and whenever possible use artillery and air.* The Vietnamese seemed to emphasize an avoidance of engagements with the enemy, a husbanding of forces and military equipment, all in anticipation of the big battle during which, at just the right moment, they would strike a fatal blow and defeat the enemy ... The "right time" never arrived...

 

      The population trusted the forces that had guarded them since the cease-fire in 1973, ... When these units redeployed, the Vietnamese voted with their feet... by beginning a mass exodus to Da Nang. ... Those ARVN soldiers who did not desert to assist their fleeing families, ... were overrun.... then joined the crazed mob attempting to leave Da Nang on anything that floated. Chaos ruled the streets of Da Nang Easter weekend 1975...” (Ref. [36] of 1444).

 

     “On 26 March 1975, Captain L. C. Chambers salutes RADM Harris, Commander, Task Group CTG-77.4 in the Western Pacific Region, after relieving Captain R. Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, 28th Commanding Officer, serving from September 7, 1973 - March 26, 1975. as Commanding Officer of USS Midway (CVA-41). Lawrence (Larry) Cleveland Chambers (born June 10, 1929) was the first African American to command a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier” (Ref. Part I, Tab G, Annex A of USS Midway (CV-41) 1975 Command History Report, 1178-G & USS Midway (CVA-41) 1975).

 

     “USS Blue Ridge (LCC-19) did not get underway for Vietnam until 27 March 1975” (Ref. [31] of 1444).

 

     “USS Midway (CVA-41) conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) inport at Piedmont pier from 21 to 30 March 1975” (Ref. Part I, Tab G, Annex A of USS Midway (CV-41) 1975 Command History Report, 1178-G & USS Midway (CVA-41) 1975 Command History Report).

 

Da Nang begins to fall to the NVN

 

     “The beginning of the end: "The massive influx of civilian refugees into the Da Nang area precipitated a breakdown in law and order.... on 30 March 1975, that former bastion of American firepower fell to the Communists. ... collapsed without a shot being fired. ... Responsibility for this disaster would be laid at the doorstep of President Thieu. The catastrophic chain of events leading to the surrender of Da Nang resulted directly from the decision to abandon Military Region 2 and the ill-advised withdrawal of the Airborne Division from Military Region 1....” (Ref. [29] of 1444).

 

     “During the two-week period that Military Region I came apart at the seams, the United States took notice and decided to take action.... The Marines of the III Marine Amphibious Force were the first to experience the effects of this reaction.... The command had been concentrating its efforts on Eagle Pull with its sights set on the almost inevitable evacuation of Cambodia. The events in South Vietnam quickly rewrote the script and seemed to indicate that the III Marine Amphibious Force might have to double load its gun and do so without delay!"

 

      Marine staff meeting on USS Blue Ridge (LCC-19). The Ambassador's "plan": "Having spent the entire day in Saigon, the delegation returned to the Blue Ridge and reported to General Carey ... concerns that Ambassador Martin had manifested during their visit to the Embassy. In no uncertain terms, he had conveyed to the Marines that he would not tolerate any outward sign of intent to depart the country because he felt it would become a self-fulfilling prophecy...."”

 

      A communication problem for USS Blue Ridge (LCC-19), the "communication & command" ship: "... communications backlog on the Blue Ridge. Delays still occurred because of the large number of staffs using the communications facilities. The various organizations participating in the operation were so widely dispersed that the majority of the orders issued by the various headquarters had to be transmitted in message format"” (Ref. [38] of 1444).