CHAPTER XCVII to CIV

(8 September 1988 to 9 August 1991)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw - 24 April 1980

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 1980)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2019)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  of III (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

Book Vol. I of IV            ISBN: TBA                EBook Vol. I of IV

ISBN: 978-1-365-73794-7

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II of III

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III of III

(14 January 2010 to 31

December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

USS Coral Sea CV-42 CVB-43 CVA-43 and CV-43 History and Those Aircraft Carriers Operating with Coral Sea During Her Tour of Service CONSTRUCTION to LAUNCHING and EARLY JET AIRCRAFT DEVELOPMENT (10 July 1944—2 April 1946) and a Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

ISBN: 9781434382917

 

 

An overhead view of the flight decks of the aircraft carriers USS Independence (CV-62), top, and USS Midway (CV-41), bottom, moored beside each other, Naval Station Pearl Harbor, 23 August 1991. A great detailed photo, showing the various aircraft of their Air Wings. Midway was en route from Naval Station, Yokosuka, Japan, to Naval Air Station, North Island, California, where she would be decommissioned in the spring of 1992. Independence would travel to Yokosuka to take over as the Navy's only forward-based aircraft carrier. US Navy photo by PH2 Omar Hasan. (Available from DefenseImagery.mil as photo # DN-ST-9203042.) NS026252. Presented by Robert M. Cieri. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026252.jpg

 

47th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, underway in the Pacific Ocean (8 September to 14 October 1988) and conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) (15 to 17 October 1988)

(8 September to 17 October 1988)

CHAPTER XCVII

 

 

    USS Midway (CV-41) departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 8 September 1988), with Battle Group Alfa, under command of RADM J. F. Shaw, Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75), Carrier Group One, Commander COMCRUDESGRU 1 and Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked, with Captain Richard Alexander Wilson, USNA '63, as Commanding Officer, on her 47th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, underway in the Pacific Ocean. She will under go her 49th deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. She will under go her 55th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 65th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, USS Midway (CV 41) WestPac Cruise Book 1987-89 & 1987-1988 Port of calls and dates).

https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-88/index.html

https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-88/040.htm

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(8 September to 14 October 1988)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th) (47th Forward Deployed)

Western Pacific Region

Pacific Ocean

CVW-5

NF

8  Sep 1988

 

14 Oct 1988

Training

65th FWFD

40-days

First of two Cruises that include foreign ports of call; that were determined separately as FWFD’s yet could be considered as one cruise returning to home port only to depart on the 18th of October 1988 in which both Cruises are over 30-days and include foreign ports of call (As of 4 April 2019, Command History Report not made available to the public and dates of Cruises came from Midway Cruise Book.).

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VFA-195

Dambusters -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4S

VFA-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4S

VFA-192

Golden Dragons -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-185

Nighthawks -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF400

A-6E / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-12

Wyverns - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

600

SH-3H

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system)

 

    “The 1988 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIV Olympiad (Korean: 서울 하계 올림픽; Seoul Hagye Ollimpik; [sʌul xɑɡʲə ɔlːimpʰik̚]), was an international multi-sport event celebrated from 17 September to 2 October 1988 in Seoul, South Korea.

 

    In the Seoul Games, 159 nations were represented by a total of 8,391 athletes: 6,197 men and 2,194 women. 237 events were held and 27,221 volunteers helped to prepare the Olympics. 11,331 media (4,978 written press and 6,353 broadcasters) showed the Games all over the world.[3]

 

    These were the last Olympic Games for the Soviet Union and East Germany, as both ceased to exist before the next Olympic Games. The Soviets utterly dominated the medal table, winning 55 gold and 132 total medals. No country came close to this result after 1988.

 

    The games were boycotted by North Korea and its ally, Cuba. Ethiopia, Albania and the Seychelles did not respond to the invitations sent by the IOC.[4] Nicaragua did not participate due to athletic and financial considerations.[5] The participation of Madagascar had been expected, and their team was expected at the opening ceremony of 160 nations. However, the country withdrew because of financial reasons.[6]

 

    Nonetheless, the much larger boycotts seen in the previous three Summer Olympics (1976, 1980 and 1984) were avoided, resulting in the largest number of participating nations during the Cold War era.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1988_Summer_Olympics

 

Ref. 3 - Seoul 1988". olympic.org. Archived from the original on 4 October 2009. Retrieved 12 March 2010.

 

Ref. 6 - Seoul Olympics 1988". Retrieved 2017-09-27.

 

Midway and the 1988 Olympics

 

Hello everyone! Welcome back to “Karl’s Korner”, a historical segment written by myself, Karl Zingheim – Ship Historian of the USS Midway Museum!

 

As we approach the start of the 2018 Winter Olympics hosted in South Korea, we are taking the time to look back 30 years ago when Midway had a special connection to the Olympics.

 

1988 Olympics

 

     The Winter Olympic Games in South Korea are not the first time the Asian nation has hosted such a famed international athletic contest. The Summer Olympics of 1988 were centered in the capital of Seoul in September and early October. South Korea was only the second Asian nation at the time to host the games, and the 1988 Olympics were beset by political controversy and international tension, some of which still rings a familiar tune this time around.

 

     For South Koreans, the 1980s were a turbulent period as years of strong economic performance brought their nation to the forefront of industrial powers, but domestic political unrest reflected profound dissatisfaction with autocratic presidential rule. Riots were common on the streets of Seoul as demonstrators demanded democratic political reforms. The arrival of the games was met with mixed emotions as some saw the hosting as an attempt to showcase and legitimize a controversial government.

 

     The international situation was troubling as well for the region. The tensions between the two Koreas was as high as ever in what would be the final years of the Cold War, and the confirmed bombing of a South Korean airliner over Burma by North Korean agents the previous November underscored how dangerous the relations were.

 

     Furthermore, the horrific memories of the terrorist attack at the 1972 Munich Olympics were never far from organizers minds.

 

     Even the hosting of the games brought controversies to the embattled peninsula when North Korea’s government demanded co-participation in providing venues for about half the sporting events. Although a dual hosting arrangement was explored in committee, no work on establishing cooperation on both sides of the DMZ developed. North Korea officially boycotted the games, with Cuba’s support, but few were willing to trust that matters would rest there for the duration of the games.

 

     In this environment of fear and distrust, special security arrangements were developed. South Korean police and military units increased patrols around Seoul and the sporting complexes, and reinforced surveillance nationwide. The U. S. Seventh Fleet, based in Japan, also stood by with its own forces, including a certain aircraft carrier. In an interview with Sports Illustrated, the security director for the Olympics, Hwang Kyu Woong, observed, “At the peak Olympic events, such as the opening ceremonies, we’ll have 100,000 security police available. The seacoasts will have reinforced guards, and I’m told the American Seventh Fleet aircraft carrier Midway will be in the waters off Pusan. We have no doubt that we are ready to provide a peaceful Olympics.”

 

 

     The USS Midway was indeed not far away, although she did take time from her patrols to make a port visit to Pusan during the games. A familiar stop for Midway crewmen, Pusan did in fact host the Olympics’ soccer matches, and the excellent rail system permitted jaunts to the main venues at Seoul’s Olympic Park.

 

 

Image taken from 1988 USS Midway Cruisebook.

 

     For several days during the games, the streets and shops were thronged by people form many lands, making the visit even more exotic for the Midway’s crew. Though the games themselves had their own sporting controversies, happily, no external threats or incidents took place. As the Midway looks on to the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea, we are certain history will repeat itself.

 

     On February 9, 2018, we will be hosting a special Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony Viewing Party! Do you have your free ticket?

 

     As always, thank you for looking back in Midway history with me. Watch out for the next Karl’s Korner post next month.

 

Launch em’… until next time, Karl

Karl Zingheim     February 5, 2018     Karl’s Korner  

https://www.midway.org/blog/midway-1988-olympics

 

     “On 14 October 1988, USS Midway (CV-41) returned to Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) with Battle Group Alfa, under command of RADM J. F. Shaw, Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75), Carrier Group One, Commander COMCRUDESGRU 1 and Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked, with Captain Richard Alexander Wilson, USNA '63, as Commanding Officer, ending her 47h deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, underway in the Pacific Ocean. Ports of call includes:  anchored Sasebo, Japan and Pusan, South Korea. Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) Squadrons: VFA-195, FA-18A; VFA-151, FA-18A; VFA-192, FA-18A; VA-185, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VA-115, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2C; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HS-12, SH-3H. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system. Her 49th deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. Her 55th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 65th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (8 September to 14 October 1988)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, USS Midway (CV 41) WestPac Cruise Book 1987-89 & 1987-1988 Port of calls and dates).

https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-88/index.html

https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-88/040.htm

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 15 to 17 October 1988” (Ref. 72).

 

48th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, underway in the Pacific Ocean (18 October to 9 November 1988) and conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) (9 November 1988 to 20 January 1989).

(18 October to 20 January 1989)

CHAPTER XCVIII

 

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 18 October 1988, with Battle Group Alfa, under command of RADM J. F. Shaw, Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75), Carrier Group One, Commander COMCRUDESGRU 1 and Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked, with Captain Richard Alexander Wilson, USNA '63, as Commanding Officer, ending her 48th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, underway in the Pacific Ocean, to participate in Exercise Team Spirit in the waters off Korea. She will under go her 50th deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. She will under go her 56th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 66th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, USS Midway (CV 41) WestPac Cruise Book 1987-89 & 1987-1988 Port of calls and dates).

https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-88/index.html

https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-88/040.htm

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(18 October to 9 November 1988)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th) (48th Forward Deployed)

Western Pacific Region

Pacific Ocean

CVW-5

NF

18 Oct 1988

9 Nov 1988

Training

66th FWFD

23-days

Second of two Cruises that include foreign ports of call; that were determined separately as FWFD’s yet could be considered as one cruise since the first cruise ended on 14 October 1988, returning to home port only to depart on the 18th of October 1988 in which one Cruise is 30-days and 23-days but both include foreign ports of call (As of 26 February 2019, Command History Report not made available to the public and dates of Cruises came from Midway Cruise Book.). Exercise Team Spirit in the waters off Korea.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VFA-195

Dambusters -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4S

VFA-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4S

VFA-192

Golden Dragons -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-185

Nighthawks -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF400

A-6E / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-12

Wyverns - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

600

SH-3H

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system)

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) anchored Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 23 October 1988.

 

      USS Midway (CV-41) was in port Pusan, South Korea from 1 to 4 November 1988” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, USS Midway (CV 41) WestPac Cruise Book 1987-89 & 1987-1988 Port of calls and dates).

https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-88/index.html

https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-88/040.htm

 

     “On 9 November 1988, USS Midway (CV-41) returned to Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Battle Group Alfa, under command of RADM J. F. Shaw, Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75), Carrier Group One, Commander COMCRUDESGRU 1 and Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked, with Captain Richard Alexander Wilson, USNA '63, as Commanding Officer, ending her 48th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, underway in the Pacific Ocean. Ports of calls included:  anchored Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 23 October 1988 and Pusan, South Korea from 1 to 4 November 1988. CVW-5 Squadrons: VFA-195, FA-18A; VFA-151, FA-18A; VFA-192, FA-18A; VA-185, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VA-115, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2C; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HS-12, SH-3H. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system. Ports of call included: Subic Bay, Philippines on 23 October 1988 and Pusan, Korea from 1 to 4 November 1988. Her 50th deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. Her 56th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 66th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (18 October to 9 November 1988)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, USS Midway (CV 41) WestPac Cruise Book 1987-89 & 1987-1988 Port of calls and dates). https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-88/index.html

https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-88/040.htm

 

18/10/88 to 09/11/88

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation

Indian Ocean

Sep 88 to Dec 89

Pacific Ocean

66th FWFD

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 9 November 1988 to 20 January 1989” (Ref. 72).

 

49th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, underway in the Pacific Ocean (21 January to 24 February 1989) and conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) (25 to 26 February 1989).

(21 January to 26 February 1989)

CHAPTER XCXIX

 

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 21 January 1989, with Battle Group Alfa, under command of RADM J. F. Shaw, Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75), Carrier Group One, Commander COMCRUDESGRU 1 and Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked, with Captain Richard Alexander Wilson, USNA '63, as Commanding Officer, on her 49th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, underway in the Pacific Ocean. She will under go her 51st deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. She will under go her 57th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 67th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, USS Midway (CV 41) WestPac Cruise Book 1987-89 & 1987-1988 Port of calls and dates).

https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-88/index.html

https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-88/040.htm

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(21 January to 24 February 1989)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th) (49th Forward Deployed)

Western Pacific Region

Pacific Ocean

CVW-5

NF

21 Jan 1989

24 Feb 1989

Training

67th FWFD

35-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VFA-195

Dambusters -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4S

VFA-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4S

VFA-192

Golden Dragons -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-185

Nighthawks -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF400

A-6E / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-12

Wyverns - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

600

SH-3H

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system)

 

     On 24 February 1989, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Richard Alexander Wilson, USNA '63, as Commanding Officer, ending her 49th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, underway in the Pacific Ocean. Ports of calls included: Sydney, the state capital of New South Wales and the most populous city in Australia. Sydney is the most populous city in Australia and the state capital of New South Wales (NSW). Sydney is located on Australia's south-east coast of the Tasman Sea. It is on Australia's south-east coast, on the Tasman Sea. Tasman Sea, section of the southwestern Pacific Ocean, between the southeastern coast of Australia and Tasmania on the west and New Zealand on the east; it merges with the Coral Sea to the north and encloses a body of water about 1,400 miles (2,250 km) wide and 900,000 square miles (2,300,000 square km) in area. CVW-5 Squadrons: VFA-195, FA-18A; VFA-151, FA-18A; VFA-192, FA-18A; VA-185, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VA-115, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2C; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HS-12, SH-3H. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 51st deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. Her 57th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 67th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (21 January to 24 February 1989)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 1182A & USS Midway (CV 41) WestPac Cruise Book 1989-90).

https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-89/index.html

 

     Captain Bernard John Smith, NAVCAD, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Midway (CV-41) on February 25, 1989, relieving Captain Richard Alexander Wilson, USNA '63, 37th Commanding Officer, serving from April 10, 1987 - February 25, 1989” (Ref. 1178-G). 

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 25 to 26 February 1989” (Ref. 72).

 

50th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, underway in the Pacific Ocean, on her 44th South China Sea (27 February to 9 April 1989) and conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan)

(10 April to 30 May 1989). (27 February to 30 May 1989)

CHAPTER C

 

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 27 February 1989, with Battle Group Alfa, under command of RADM J. F. Shaw, Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75), Carrier Group One, Commander COMCRUDESGRU 1 and Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked, with Captain Bernard John Smith, NAVCAD, on her 50th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, underway in the Pacific Ocean, on her 44th South China Sea. She will under go her 52nd deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. She will under go her 58th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 68th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & USS Midway (CV 41) WestPac Cruise Book 1989-90). https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-89/index.html

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(27 February to 9 April 1989)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th) (50th Forward Deployed)

Western Pacific Region

Pacific Ocean

44th SCS

CVW-5

NF

27 Feb 1989

9 Apr 1989

Training

68th FWFD

42-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VFA-195

Dambusters -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4S

VFA-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4S

VFA-192

Golden Dragons -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-185

Nighthawks -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF400

A-6E / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-12

Wyverns - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

600

SH-3H

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system)

 

     On 9 April 1989, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Bernard John Smith, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her 50th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, underway in the Pacific Ocean, on her 44th South China Sea. Ports of calls include: Pusan, the largest port city in South Korea and is located on the southeastern-most tip of the Korean peninsula and Hong Kong, situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea. Her 52nd deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. Her 58th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 68th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (27 February to 9 April 1989)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & USS Midway (CV 41) WestPac Cruise Book 1989-90). https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-89/index.html

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 10 April to 30 May 1989” (Ref. 72).

 

51st deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, on her 32nd “WestPac,” underway in the Pacific Ocean, on her 45th South China Sea (31 May to 25 July 1989) and conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) (26 July to 14 August 1989). (31 May to 14 August 1989)

CHAPTER CI

 

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 31 May 1989, with Captain Bernard John Smith, NAVCAD, on her 51st deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, on her 32nd “WestPac,” underway in the Pacific Ocean, on her 45th South China Sea. From 7 to 8 June 1989, Midway was put on standby after the massacre in Tinnamen Square, People's Republic of China (PRC) for possible evacuation of American citizens from the People’s Republic of China. She will under go her 53rd deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. She will under go her 59th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 69th  Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & USS Midway (CV 41) WestPac Cruise Book 1989-90).

https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-89/index.html

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(31 May to 25 July 1989)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (51st Forward Deployed)

Western Pacific Region Pacific Ocean

32nd WestPac

45th SCS

CVW-5

NF

31 May 1989

25 Jul 1989

Western Pacific

69th FWFD

56-days

Midway was put on standby after the massacre in Tinnamen Square, People's Republic of China (PRC) for possible evacuation of American citizens from the People’s Republic of China from 7 to 8 June 1989.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VFA-195

Dambusters -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4S

VFA-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4S

VFA-192

Golden Dragons -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-185

Nighthawks -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF400

A-6E / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-12

Wyverns - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

600

SH-3H

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system)

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) was put on standby after the massacre in Tinnamen Square, People's Republic of China (PRC) for possible evacuation of American citizens from the People’s Republic of China from 7 to 8 June 1989” (Ref. 1182A).

 

     An F/A-18 assigned to VFA-151 suffers an engine failure during her cat launch and crashes into the sea directly in front of the USS Midway (CV-41) operating 90 miles west of Luzon, Philippines on 23 June 1989. The pilot ejected and was recovered safely” (Ref. 84A).

 

     On 25 July 1989, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Bernard John Smith, NAVCAD, Commanding Officer embarked returned to Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Bernard John Smith, NAVCAD, ending her 51st deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, 32nd “WestPac”, underway in the Pacific Ocean, on her 45h South China Sea. Midway was put on standby after the massacre in Tinnamen Square, People's Republic of China (PRC) for possible evacuation of American citizens from the People’s Republic of China from 7 to 8 June 1989. An F/A-18 assigned to VFA-151 suffers an engine failure during her cat launch and crashes into the sea directly in front of the Midway operating 90 miles west of Luzon, Philippines on 23 June 1989. The pilot ejected and was recovered safely. Ports of calls included: Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines and Phattaya Beach, a city in Thailand, a beach resort popular with tourists and expatriates. It is located on the east coast of the Gulf of Thailand, about 165 km southeast of Bangkok within but not part of Amphoe Bang Lamung (Banglamung) in the province of Chonburi. The Gulf of Thailand, also known as the Gulf of Siam, is a shallow inlet in the western part of the South China Sea, a marginal body of water in the western Pacific Ocean. The gulf is around 800 km (497 mi) long and up to 560 km (348 mi) wide, has a surface area of 320,000 km2 (123,553 sq mi) and is surrounded on the north, west and southwest by Thailand, on the northeast by Cambodia and Vietnam. The South China Sea is to the southeast. Squadrons: VFA-195, FA-18A; VFA-151, FA-18A; VFA-192, FA-18A; VA-185, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VA-115, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2C; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HS-12, SH-3H. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 53rd deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. Her 59th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 69th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (31 May to 25 July 1989)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 84A, 1182A & USS Midway (CV 41) WestPac Cruise Book 1989-90). https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-89/index.html

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) (26 July to 14 August 1989)” (Ref. 72).

 

52nd deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, on her 33rd “WestPac,” underway in the Pacific Ocean, on her 46th South China Sea, on her 13th Indian Ocean, conducting Exercise Thalay in conjunction with Royal Thai Navy Ships and Operation Classic Resolve in response to the coup attempt occurring in the Republic of the Philippines and Persian Gulf (15 August to 11 December 1989) and conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) (12 December 1989 to 21 February 1990). (15 August to 21 February 1990)

CHAPTER CII

 

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) with Rear Admiral Lyle F. Bull, Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Captain J. M. Burnn, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 15 August 1989, Captain Bernard John Smith, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer and Captain S. P. Hannifin, as Executive Officer, on her 52nd deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, on her 33rd “WestPac,” underway in the Pacific Ocean, on her 46th South China Sea, on her 13th Indian Ocean, conducting Exercise Thalay in conjunction with Royal Thai Navy Ships and Operation Classic Resolve in response to the coup attempt occurring in the Republic of the Philippines and Persian Gulf; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 55th deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. She will under go her 61st deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 71st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 1182, 1182A, 1182B, 1182C, 1182D, 1182E, 1182F, 1182G, 1182H, 1182HI, 1182I, 1182J, 1182K, 1182L, 1182M & 1182N).

 

USS Midway (CV 41) WestPac Cruise Book 1989-90 – Ref. 1182

Chain of Command and Flag Staff – Ref. 1182B / Flag Staff – Ref. 1182C /

DESRON 15 – Ref. 1182D / Sailors of the Year / Month – Ref. 1182K /

The Cruise – Ref. 1182M / Ports of Call – Ref. 1182N

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(15 August to 11 December 1989)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (52nd Forward Deployed)

Western Pacific Region Pacific Ocean

33rd WestPac 46th SCS

13th IO

CVW-5

NF

15 Aug 1989

11 Dec 1989

Western Pacific

Indian Ocean

70th FWFD

119-days

Exercise Thalay in conjunction with Royal Thai Navy Ships and Operation Classic Resolve in response to the coup attempt occurring in the Republic of the Philippines and Persian Gulf.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VFA-195

Dambusters -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4S

VFA-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4S

VFA-192

Golden Dragons -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-185

Nighthawks -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF400

A-6E / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-12

Wyverns - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

600

SH-3H

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system)

 

     On 28 August 1989, USS Midway (CV-41) participated in Exercise Thalay in conjunction with Royal Thai Navy Ships. The exercise lasted three days.

 

     On 9 September 1989, USS Midway (CV-41) logged its 200,000th cat shot since being recommissioned in 1972.

 

     On 10 November 1989, USS Midway (CV-41) became the first aircraft carrier to pull pierside in Fremantle, Australia.

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) participated in Operation Classic Resolve when the coup attempt occurred in the Republic of the Philippines. The operation, run in conjunction with the Air Force and assisted by the USS Enterprise (CVN-65) lasted from 2 to 9 December 1989. Because of its involvement, the Midway was awarded the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal” (Ref. 1182A).

 

     On 11 December 1989, USS Midway (CV-41) with Rear Admiral Lyle F. Bull, Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Captain J. M. Burnn, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Bernard John Smith, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer and Captain S. P. Hannifin, as Executive Officer, ending her 52nd deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, on her 33rd “WestPac,” underway in the Pacific Ocean, on her 46th South China Sea, on her 13th Indian Ocean. Midway participated in Exercise Thalay in conjunction with Royal Thai Navy Ships on 28 August 1987. The exercise lasted three days. On 9 September 1987, Midway logged its 200,000th cat shot since being recommissioned in 1972. On 10 November 1987, Midway became the first aircraft carrier to pull pierside in Fremantle, Australia. Midway participated in Operation Classic Resolve when the coup attempt occurred in the Republic of the Philippines. The operation, run in conjunction with the Air Force and assisted by the USS Enterprise (CVN-65) lasted from 2 to 9 December 1987. Because of its involvement, the Midway was awarded the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal. Ports of calls included: Hong Kong, situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines; Phattaya Beach, a city in Thailand, a beach resort popular with tourists and expatriates. It is located on the east coast of the Gulf of Thailand, about 165 km southeast of Bangkok within but not part of Amphoe Bang Lamung (Banglamung) in the province of Chonburi and Pusan, the largest port city in South Korea and is located on the southeastern-most tip of the Korean peninsula; Singaporee, officially the Republic of Singapore, a Southeast Asian island city-state off the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, 137 kilometres (85 mi) north of the equator (An island country made up of 63 islands, it is separated from Malaysia by the Straits of Johor to its north and from Indonesia's Riau Islands by the Singapore Strait to its south); Mombasa, an important regional tourism centre. Situated on the east coast of Kenya, in Coast Province, Mombasa's bordering the Indian Ocean; Diego Garcia, a tropical, footprint-shaped coral atoll located south of the equator in the central Indian Ocean. It is part of the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT);; Fremantle, a city in Western Australia, located at the mouth of the Swan River. Fremantle Harbour serves as the port of Perth, the state capital and Perth, the capital and largest city of the Australian state of Western Australia; (No photos of Singapore or Diego Garcia). CVW-5 Squadrons: VFA-195, FA-18A; VFA-151, FA-18A; VFA-192, FA-18A; VA-185, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VA-115, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2C; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HS-12, SH-3H. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 54th deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. Her 60th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 70th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (15 August to 11 December 1989)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 1182, 1182A, 1182B, 1182C, 1182D, 1182E, 1182F, 1182G, 1182H, 1182HI, 1182I, 1182J, 1182K, 1182L, 1182M, 1182N & USS Midway (CV 41) WestPac Cruise Book 1989-90). https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-89/index.html

https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-89/index_006.htm

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 12 December 1989 to 21 February 1990” (Ref. 72).

 

53rd deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, underway in the Pacific Ocean, on her 47th South China Sea (20 February to 6 April 1990) and conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) (7 April to 1 October 1990). (20 February to 1 October 1990)

CHAPTER CIII

 

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 20 February 1990, with Captain Bernard John Smith, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer and Captain S. P. Hannifin, as Executive Officer, on her 53rd deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, underway in the Pacific Ocean, on her 47th South China Sea; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 55th deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. She will under go her 61st deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 71st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).   

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(20 February to 6 April 1990)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (53rd Forward Deployed)

Western Pacific Region Pacific Ocean

47th SCS

CVW-5

NF

20 Feb 1990

6 Apr 1990

Western Pacific

Indian Ocean

71st FWFD

46-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VFA-195

Dambusters -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4S

VFA-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4S

VFA-192

Golden Dragons -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-185

Nighthawks -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF400

A-6E / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-12

Wyverns - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

600

SH-3H

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system)

 

 

Battle Group Alfa, Persian Gulf, 1990. NS024143. Chester Morris, of USS Midway (CV-41) Crew Member 1962-65.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024143.jpg

 

     On 6 April 1990, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Bernard John Smith, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer and Captain S. P. Hannifin, as Executive Officer, ending her 53rd deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, underway in the Pacific Ocean, on her 47th South China Sea. Ports of calls included: Hong Kong, situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines and Sasebo, a city in Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. Squadrons: VFA-195, FA-18A; VFA-151, FA-18A; VFA-192, FA-18A; VA-185, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VA-115, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2C; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HS-12, SH-3H. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 55th deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. Her 61st deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 71st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (20 February to 7 April 1990)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).   

 

     Captain Arthur Karl Cebrowski, NAVCAD, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Midway (CV-41) on June 12, 1990, relieving Captain Bernard John Smith, NAVCAD, 38th Commanding Officer, serving from February 25, 1989 - June 12, 1990” (Ref. 1178-G). 

 

     On 20 June 1990, USS Midway (CV-41) experiences two explosions in an emergency equipment storeroom while operating off Japan, killing 2 and seriously injuring 9 with burns covering from 14 to 80 percent of their bodies. One of the injured sailors dies 8 days later as a result of his injuries. The explosions caused a fire that took 10 hours to extinguish.  All sailors killed and injured in the accident were part of the "Flying Squad" which was the Midway’s elite fire fighting crew. They were sent to the storeroom to check out a report of smoke. The first explosion occurred shortly after the sailors entered the storeroom” (Ref. 84A).

 

     On 16 July 1990, a magnitude 7.8 earthquake struck the island of Luzon, Philippines. The epicenter was near the town of Rizal, Nueva Ecija, roughly 60 kilometers from Mount Pinatubo. This earthquake caused a landslide, some local tremors, and a brief increase in steam emissions from a preexisting geothermal area at Mount Pinatubo” (Ref. [2] of 1183).

 

     On 2 August 1990, Iraq invaded its neighbor Kuwait, and U.S. forces moved into Saudi Arabia as part of Operation Desert Shield to protect that country against invasion by Iraq” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

     “Through the 1980s several frigate- and destroyer-type ships and minesweepers were assigned to the Middle East Force as well as support ships. After the 2 August 1990 Iraqi occupation of Kuwait, the largest armada since World War II assembled in the Gulf in support of Operation Desert Shield. The Middle East Force found itself operating under operational control of U.S. Naval Forces Central” (Ref. 1-Saratoga, 72 & 313).

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 7 April to 1 October 1990” (Ref. 72).

 

54th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, on her 34th “WestPac,” underway in the Pacific Ocean, on her 48th South China Sea, her 14th Indian Ocean, her 8th Arabian Sea, 6th North Arabian Sea and 4th Gulf of Oman on her 2nd Arabian / Persian Gulf in support of her 1st Operation Desert Shield to deter Iraqi aggression, operating under operational control of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, becoming the first carrier to enter the Arabian/Persian Gulf since 1974, Operation Imminent Thunder and 1st Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 (2 October 1990 to 17 April 1991) and conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) (18 April to 9 August 1991). (2 October 1990 to 9 August 1991)

CHAPTER CIV

 

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 2 October 1990, with Captain Arthur Karl Cebrowski, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her 54th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, on her 34th “WestPac,” underway in the Pacific Ocean, on her 48th South China Sea, her 14th Indian Ocean, her 8th Arabian Sea, 6th North Arabian Sea and 4th Gulf of Oman on her 2nd Arabian / Persian Gulf in support of Operation Imminent Thunder, an eight-day combined amphibious landing exercise in northeastern Saudi Arabia which involved about 1,000 U.S. Marines, 16 warships, and more than 1,100 aircraft and will participate in her 1st Operation Desert Storm to deter Iraqi aggression, commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991, when Operation Desert Shield commenced 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait) became Operation Desert Storm, at which time the U. S. Navy launched 228 sorties from USS Ranger (CV-61) and USS Midway (CVA-41) in the Persian Gulf, from USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) en route to the Gulf, and from USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), USS Saratoga (CV-60), and USS America (CV-66) in the Red Sea (the Navy launched more than 100 Tomahawk missiles from nine ships in the Mediterranean Sea, the Red Sea, and the Persian Gulf), operating under operational control of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, operational control extending to the Indian Ocean. She will under go her 56th deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. She will under go her 62nd deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 72nd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).   

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(2 October 1990 to 17 April 1991)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (8th Arabian Sea, 6th North Arabian Sea and 4th Gulf of Oman & 2nd Arabian / Persian Gulf) (54th Forward Deployed)

Western Pacific Region Pacific Ocean

34th WestPac 48th SCS

14th IO

CVW-5

NF

2 Oct 1990

17 Apr 1991

Western Pacific

Indian Ocean

Middle East

North Arabian Sea

Persian Gulf

72nd FWFD

198-days

Becoming the first carrier to enter the Arabian/Persian Gulf since 1974, operating under operational control of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command. On station in the North Arabian Sea, relieving USS Independence (CV-62) as in the leadup to the Gulf War on 1 November 1990, participating in Operation Imminent Thunder, an eight-day combined amphibious landing exercise in northeastern Saudi Arabia which involved about 1,000 U.S. Marines, 16 warships, and more than 1,100 aircraft on 15 November 1990.

1st Operation Desert Storm to deter Iraqi aggression, commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991, when Operation Desert Shield commenced 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait) became Operation Desert Storm, The United Nations set an ultimatum deadline of 15 January 1991 for Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait. George H. W. Bush addressed the nation on 16 January 1991 at 9 p.m. EST and announced that the libration of Kuwait from Iraq, at which time the Navy launched 228 sorties from USS Ranger (CV-61) and Midway in the Persian Gulf, from USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) en route to the Gulf, and from USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), USS Saratoga (CV-60), and USS America (CV-66) in the Red Sea. In addition, the Navy launched more than 100 Tomahawk missiles from nine ships in the Mediterranean Sea, the Red Sea, and the Persian Gulf, continuing operations until Desert Storm officially ended 27 February, operating under operational control of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, operational control extending to the Indian Ocean. Midway’s aircraft joined those of the other carriers in flying combat air patrol, strike, reconnaissance, and rescue missions. The campaign was over in six weeks. Rear Admiral Daniel P. March, Commander, Carrier Group Five, became commander, Task Force 154 (Battle Force Zulu), part of Naval Forces Central Command.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VFA-195

Dambusters -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4S

VFA-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4S

VFA-192

Golden Dragons -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-185

Nighthawks -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF400

A-6E / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-12

Wyverns - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

600

SH-3H

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system)

 

     On 1 November 1990, USS Midway (CV-41) was again on station in the North Arabian Sea, relieving USS Independence (CV-62)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72). https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-91/239.htm 

 

     On 15 November 1990, USS Midway (CV-41) participated in Operation Imminent Thunder, an eight-day combined amphibious landing exercise in northeastern Saudi Arabia which involved about 1,000 U.S. Marines, 16 warships, and more than 1,100 aircraft.

 

      The United Nations set an ultimatum deadline of 15 January 1991 for Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

     President George H. W. Bush addressed the nation on 16 January 1991 at 9 p.m. EST and announced that the libration of Kuwait from Iraq” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

     In the early morning hours of 17 January 1991, Operation Desert Shield became Operation Desert Storm, during which time, the U. S. Navy launched 228 sorties from USS Ranger (CV-61) and USS Midway (CV-41) in the Persian Gulf, from USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) en route to the Gulf, and from USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), USS Saratoga (CV-60), and USS America (CV-66) in the Red Sea. In addition, the Navy launched more than 100 Tomahawk missiles from nine ships in the Mediterranean Sea, the Red Sea, and the Persian Gulf” (Ref. 1-Ranger, 1-Saratoga & 72). https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-91/353.htm

 

     “During Operation Desert Storm in 1991, Carriers operated under operational control of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command where it remained following the war. The Commander, Seventh Fleet served as naval component commander for Central Command. Since the Gulf War, NAVCENT fulfilled the roles of both a naval component command and as the fleet command. Ships from the East and West Coasts comprised the fleet, but it operated without a traditionally understood structure or number” (Ref. 313 & 313A).

 

     In the leadup to the Gulf War, Rear Admiral Daniel P. March, Commander, Carrier Group Five, became commander, Task Force 154 (Battle Force Zulu), part of Naval Forces Central Command. The Task Force directed four carriers (USS Midway (CV-41), CV-61, CV-66, and CVN-71) in the Arabian Sea/Persian Gulf during Operation Desert Storm (Ref. [7] of 1193).

 

     On 6 February 1991, an F-14A Tomcat from VF-1, off USS Ranger (CV-61), piloted by Lt. Stuart Broce, with Cmdr. Ron McElraft as Radar Intercept Officer, downed an Iraqi MI-8 Hip helicopter with an AIM-9M Sidewinder missile” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

 

     Desert Storm officially ended 27 February 1991, and USS Midway (CV-41) departed the Persian Gulf on 11 March 1991 and returned to Yokosuka” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

 

     In March 1991, Magma rising toward the surface from more than 32 kilometers beneath Mount Pinatubo triggered small earthquakes and caused powerful steam explosions that blasted three craters on the north flank of the volcano. Thousands of small earthquakes occurred beneath Pinatubo, and many thousands of tons of sulfur dioxide gas were emitted by the volcano” (Ref. [2] of 1091).

 

     On 17 April 1991, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Arthur Karl Cebrowski, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her 54th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, on her 34th “WestPac,” underway in the Pacific Ocean, on her 48th South China Sea, her 14th Indian Ocean, her 8th Arabian Sea, 6th North Arabian Sea and 4th Gulf of Oman on her 2nd Arabian / Persian Gulf, operating under operational control of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, becoming the first carrier to enter the Arabian/Persian Gulf since 1974, on station in the North Arabian Sea, relieving USS Independence (CV-62) as in the leadup to the Gulf War on 1 November 1990, participating in Operation Imminent Thunder, an eight-day combined amphibious landing exercise in northeastern Saudi Arabia which involved about 1,000 U.S. Marines, 16 warships, and more than 1,100 aircraft on 15 November 1990 and participated in her 1st Operation Desert Storm to deter Iraqi aggression, commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991, when Operation Desert Shield commenced 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait) became Operation Desert Storm, The United Nations set an ultimatum deadline of 15 January 1991 for Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait. George H. W. Bush addressed the nation on 16 January 1991 at 9 p.m. EST and announced that the libration of Kuwait from Iraq, at which time the Navy launched 228 sorties from USS Ranger (CV-61) and Midway in the Persian Gulf, from USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) en route to the Gulf, and from USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), USS Saratoga (CV-60), and USS America (CV-66) in the Red Sea. In addition, the Navy launched more than 100 Tomahawk missiles from nine ships in the Mediterranean Sea, the Red Sea, and the Persian Gulf, continuing operations until Desert Storm officially ended 27 February, operating under operational control of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, operational control extending to the Indian Ocean. Midway’s aircraft joined those of the other carriers in flying combat air patrol, strike, reconnaissance, and rescue missions. The campaign was over in six weeks. Rear Admiral Daniel P. March, Commander, Carrier Group Five, became commander, Task Force 154 (Battle Force Zulu), part of Naval Forces Central Command. The Task Force directed four carriers (Midway), CV-61, CV-66, and CVN-71) in the Arabian Sea/Persian Gulf during Operation Desert Storm. On 6 February 1991, an F-14A Tomcat from VF-1, off USS Ranger (CV-61), piloted by Lt. Stuart Broce, with Cmdr. Ron McElraft as Radar Intercept Officer, downed an Iraqi MI-8 Hip helicopter with an AIM-9M Sidewinder missile. During Operation Desert Storm in 1991, Carriers operated under operational control of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command where it remained following the war. The Commander, Seventh Fleet served as naval component commander for Central Command. Since the Gulf War, NAVCENT fulfilled the roles of both a naval component command and as the fleet command. Ships from the East and West Coasts comprised the fleet, but it operated without a traditionally understood structure or number. Desert Storm officially ended 27 February 1991, and Midway departed the Persian Gulf on 11 March 1991 and returned to Yokosuka. In March 1991, Magma rising toward the surface from more than 32 kilometers beneath Mount Pinatubo triggered small earthquakes and caused powerful steam explosions that blasted three craters on the north flank of the volcano. Thousands of small earthquakes occurred beneath Pinatubo, and many thousands of tons of sulfur dioxide gas were emitted by the volcano. Ports of calls included: Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Singapore; Abu Dhabi, U.A.E., the capital and the second largest city of the United Arab Emirates in terms of population and the largest of the seven member emirates of the United Arab Emirates; anchored and Phattaya Beach, a city in Thailand, a beach resort popular with tourists and expatriates. It is located on the east coast of the Gulf of Thailand, about 165 km southeast of Bangkok within but not part of Amphoe Bang Lamung (Banglamung) in the province of Chonburi and anchored Pusan, the largest port city in South Korea and is located on the southeastern-most tip of the Korean peninsula and Hong Kong, situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea. Squadrons: VFA-195, FA-18A; VFA-151, FA-18A; VFA-192, FA-18A; VA-185, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VA-115, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2C; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HS-12, SH-3H. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 56th deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. Her 62nd deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 72nd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (2 October 1990 to 17 April 1991)” (Ref. 1-Midway, Saratoga, Ranger, 72, 313, 313A, 1183, [2] of 1191 & [7] of 1193).

 

02/10/90 to 17/04/91

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Battle Efficiency Award (Navy "E" Ribbon), marking her as the outstanding carrier in the Pacific Fleet

Jan to Dec 1990

34th WestPac

48th SCS

14th IO

8th Arabian Sea

6th North Arabian Sea

4th Gulf of Oman

2nd Arabian/Persian Gulf

72nd FWFD

Navy Unit Commendation

Operation "Desert Storm"

Jan to Feb 1991

same

Liberation of Kuwait Medal (Saudi Arabia)

Jan to Feb 1991

same

Kuwait Liberation Medal (Kuwait)

Nov 1990 to Jan 1991

same

National Defense Service Medal

Gulf War

Jan to Mar 1991

same

Southwest Asia Service Medal with 2 Bronze Stars

Defense of Saudi Arabia

2 Nov 1990 to 14 Jan 1991

same

Southwest Asia Service Medal with 2 Bronze Stars

Liberation and Defense of Kuwait

Jan to Mar 1991

same

Ref. - 1181 reported Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal was awarded for Persian Gulf (Operation "Earnest Will") for the period Sep to Nov 1989, which is not possible as Operation "Earnest Will" was conducted from 24 July 1987 to 26 September 1988, and was the American military protection of Kuwaiti-owned tankers from Iranian attacks in 1987 and 1988.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Earnest_Will

7th North Arabian Sea & 5th Arabian / Persian Gulf count is based on Awards of Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal for Operation "Earnest Will" operating in the Persian Gulf, while the period Sep to Nov 1989 was not counted as either a Persian Gulf deployment or Operation "Earnest Will."

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

     On 7 June 1991, the first magmatic eruptions took place, resulting in the formation of a 660 feet (200 m) high lava dome at the summit of the volcano” (Ref. of 1091).

 

     On 10 June 1991, after receiving final authorization from the Secretary of Defense, all non-essential military and Department of Defense civilian personnel and their dependents initiated land evacuation from Clark Air Base at 0600 local time. This land evacuation brought an estimated 15,000 personnel and several thousand vehicles onto U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay” (Ref. of 1191).

 

     Captain Larry Lee Ernst, NAVCAD, assumed command as the final CO during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Midway (CV-41) on 13 June 1991, relieving Captain Arthur Karl Cebrowski, NAVCAD, 39th Commanding Officer, serving from June 12, 1990 - June 13, 1991” (Ref. 1178-G). 

 

     From 12 to 14 June 1991, several waves of eruptions generated eruption columns up to 80,000 feet (24,000 m) in altitude and pyroclastic flows (high speed avalanches of superheated gas and tephra) extending out to 4 kilometers from the summit. These eruptions were accompanied by nearly continuous seismic activity and expulsion of huge quantities of ash, tephra, and volcanic bombs” (Ref. of 1191).

 

     On 15 June 1991, the major eruption of Mount Pinatubo occurred, sending ash and tephra over 100,000 feet (30,000 m) into the air. Clark Air Base and Subic Bay Naval Station, the two largest U.S. military bases in the Philippines, were heavily damaged by ash from this volcanic eruption. Nearly one foot of ash accumulated on both Clark Air Base and U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay. Many buildings collapsed under the weight of the accumulated ash, and all flight operations were suspended at both bases for many days or even weeks afterwards” (Ref. [2] of 1191).

 

     USS Midway (CV-41) conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 18 April to 9 August 1991” (Ref. 72).