CHAPTER XXX to XXX, Appendix I

(26 November 1973 to 10 January 1974)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw - 24 April 1980

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

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978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 1980)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2019)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  of III (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

Book Vol. I of IV            ISBN: TBA                EBook Vol. I of IV

ISBN: 978-1-365-73794-7

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II of III

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

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EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III of III

(14 January 2010 to 31

December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

USS Coral Sea CV-42 CVB-43 CVA-43 and CV-43 History and Those Aircraft Carriers Operating with Coral Sea During Her Tour of Service CONSTRUCTION to LAUNCHING and EARLY JET AIRCRAFT DEVELOPMENT (10 July 1944—2 April 1946) and a Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

ISBN: 9781434382917

 

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) underway in the Gulf of Tonkin during operations off North Vietnam, June 1971 NS0241af  - Robert Hurst.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/0241af.jpg

 

Second deployment, as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, in the Western Pacific Region, to operate in the Philippines Op area, on her tenth South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise (26 November to 22 December 1973) and conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) (23 to 31 December 1973).

(26 November to 10 January 1974)

CHAPTER XXX

 

 

     USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77), Rear Admiral William R. McClendon, COMNAVAIRPACREP WESTPAC assigned and CDR B. W. Streit, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 26 November 1973, with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her first Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her second deployment, as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, in the Western Pacific Region, to operate in the Philippines Op area, on her tenth South China Sea. CTF-77.4 Commander not reported. She will under go her fourth deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Stationin the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. She will under go her tenth deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 20th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II(Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(26 November to 22 December 1973)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CVA-41) –7th (2nd Forward Deployed)

Western

Pacific

Region

Pacific Ocean

10th SCS Philippines Op area

CVW-5

NF

26 Nov 1973

22 Dec 1973

Vietnam

20th FWFD

27-days

1st Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-93

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6A

A-6B

KA-6D

VFP-63 Det. 3

Eyes of the Fleet - Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader -     Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

600

RF-8G

VMCJ-1 Det. 101

Golden Hawks - Marine fixed-wing squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(RM) 610

EA-6A

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye -Electronics

010

E-2B

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

003-007

SH-3G

 

 

     USS Midway (CVA-41) was en route to Subic Bay and South China Sea operations when on 30 November 1973, COMSEVENTHFLT paid a brief visit to Midway by helo from the USS Oklahoma City (CG-5) .

 

       On 1 December 1973, a burial at sea ceremony was held for LT Richard L. PIERSON, USN, VA-56, who was killed on a routine training flight on 12 November 1973, while USS Midway (CVA-41) was inport Yokosuka” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

     “After training operations near the Philippines, USS Midway (CVA-41) conducted her first Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise performed at “Yankee Station” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the South China Sea from 4 to 8 December 1973.

 

       USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point on 10 December 1973, conducting her first Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise performed at “Yankee Station” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the South China Sea from 4 to 8 December 1973” (Ref. 405 & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

     On 11 December 1973, seven crewmen on board USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) were killed in a boiler-room blaze 700 nautical miles eastern of the Philippines. The fire could be extinguished by the crew, and Kitty Hawk was towed to Subic Bay, Philippines, for repairs” (Ref. 84A).

 

     USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point from 10 to 12 December 1973, departing for her forward deployed port of Yokosuka, Japan on the 12th.

 

       While in transit, CDR C. W. Roe, USN relieved CDR F. L. Bottenberg, USN as Executive Officer of USS Midway (CVA-41) on 15 December 1973” (Ref. 405 & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

     On 22 December 1973, USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77), Rear Admiral William R. McClendon, COMNAVAIRPACREP WESTPAC assigned and CDR B. W. Streit, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her first Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her and second deployment, as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, in the Western Pacific Region, to operate in the Philippines Op area, on her tenth South China Sea. CTF-77.4 Commander not reported. On 30 November 1973, COMSEVENTHFLT paid a brief visit to Midway by helo from the USS Oklahoma City (CG-5). On 1 December 1973, a burial at sea ceremony was held for LT RICHARD L. PIERSON, USN, VA-56, who was killed on a routine training flight on 12 November 1973, while Midway was inport Yokosuka. After training operations near the Philippines, Midway conducted her first Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise performed at “Yankee Station” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the South China Sea from 4 to 8 December 1973. Midway arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point on 10 December 1973, conducting her first Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise performed at “Yankee Station” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the South China Sea from 4 to 8 December 1973. Midway made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point from 10 to 12 December 1973, departing for her forward deployed port of Yokosuka, Japan on the 12th. While in transit, CDR C. W. Roe, USN relieved CDR F. L. Bottenberg, USN as Executive Officer of Midway on 15 December 1973. Midway made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point from 10 to 12 December 1973, departing for her forward deployed port of Yokosuka, Japan. Ports of calls include: Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D, VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; VMCJ-1 Det. 101, EA-6ª; VAW-115, E-2B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. Her fourth deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Stationin the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. Her tenth deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 20th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (26 November to 22 December 1973)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 405 & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

26/11/73 to 22/12/73

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

National Defense Service Medal

Vietnam

Jan 1961 to Aug 1974

10th SCS

20th FWFD

 

 

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

     “On 1 January, 1974, USS Midway (CVA-41) was inport Yokosuka, Japan with RADM W. L. Macdonald embarked as COMNAVAIRPACREP WESTPAC and COMCARGRU-3, serving as Commander, Task Group CTG-77.4 in the Western Pacific Region. On 5 January 1974, RADM W. L. Macdonald was relieved as COMCARGRU-3 but remained embarked in Midway as COMNAVAIRPACREP WESTPAC, serving as Commander, Task Group CTG-77.4 in the Western Pacific Region.

 

       USS Midway (CVA-41) conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 23 to 10 January 1974” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

USS MIDWAY (CVA-41) 1973 Years End Summary (1972/1973 Deployment)

CHAPTER XXX

Appendix I

 

 

A.  Command Organization

 

1.  Captain S. R. FOLEY, JR., USN, 1310; Commanding from 1 January 1973 to 7 September 1973.

 

2.  Captain R. J. SCHULTE, 1310; Commanding; from 7 September 1973 through 31 December 1973.

 

3.  The USS Midway (CVA-4l) was homeported at Naval Air Station Alameda, California from 1 January 1973 until 30 June 1973 at which tine the homeport was officially changed to Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan from 30 June 1973 through 31 December 1973. The command consists of the Midway\Attack Carrier Air Wing Five was embarked but will not be addressed in this history report as it submits a separate command history. The mission and function of the ship have not changed during 1973.

 

     “On 8 March 1973, USS Midway (CVA-41) with Rear Admiral W. R. Flanagan, relieving Rear Admiral J. L. Butts, Commander and Captain K. L. Shugart, as Chief of Staff, Carrier Division One and Captain C. E. Myers, Commander, Carrier Air Wing 5 (CVW-5) embarked arrived Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, with Captain S, R. Foley, Jr. USNA '50, relieved Captain W. L. Harris, Jr., USNA ’37, as Commanding Officer, ending her Ninth “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, on her ninth South China Sea, on her third Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East, conducting combat sorties against communist forces in North Vietnam, South Vietnam and Cambodia, returning to the war zone seven weeks earlier than her scheduled deployment date. With a full complement of crew and Air wing, Midway sailed from Naval Air Station, Alameda, California after a one day stay for fuel and supplies on 10 April 1972. Midway set sail for work up of the Air wing and subsequent combat missions on her in the South China Sea and the Gulf of Tonkin on “Yankee Station,” conducting combat missions or strikes against North Vietnam targets and Laos as follows: En route Southern Station/TTY from 24 to 29 April 1972, conducting combat missions or strikes against North Vietnam targets on her first line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin when CVW-5 began flight operations in the Southern Stations OPS AREA from 30 April to 12 May 1972, followed by operations on “Yankee Station” from 13 to 31 May 1972; Yankee Station OPS from 11 June to 7 July 1972 on her second line period; Yankee Station OPS from 17 July to 13 August 1972 on her third line period; Yankee Station OPS from 24 August to 10 September 1972 on her fourth line period; Yankee Station OPS from 20 September to 12 October 1972 on her fifth line period; Yankee Station OPS from 24 October to 23 November 1972 on her sixth line period; Yankee Station OPS from 3 to 20 December 1972 on her seventh line period from 3 to 20 December 1972; and after 16 January 1973, only Laos targets, her eighth line period conducting combat missions against North Vietnam and Laos from 4 to 23 January 1973 and her ninth and final line period and from 4 to 9 February 1973 combat missions and strikes restricted to Laos. Ports of calls include: Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines a second time; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines a third time; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines a fourth time; Hongkong, B. C. C., situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines a fifth time; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines a sixth time; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines a seventh time; Singapore, is a Southeast Asian island city-state off the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, 137 kilometres (85 mi) north of the equator (An island country made up of 63 islands, it is separated from Malaysia by the Straits of Johor to its north and from Indonesia's Riau Islands by the Singapore Strait to its south); Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines a eight time; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point a ninth time and Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point a tenth time. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4B; VF-151, F-4B; VA-93, A-7B; VA-56, A-7B; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D, VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-130 Det. 2, EKA-3B; HC-1 Det. 8, SH-3G and HC-7 Det. 110, HH-3A. *These squadron detachments were not aboard the carrier for the entire deployment. USS Worden (CG-18) and USS Towers (DDG-9) joined up with Midway as part of her task force. Her second deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her eighth deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 21st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (10 April 1972 to 8 March 1973)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 405, 1081O, 1178-G, 1181, 1181A, 1181B, 1181C, 1181DD, 1181E, 1181E1, 1181F, 1181G, 1181H, 1181I, 1181J, 1181N, 1083 & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973 & 1973).

 

10/04/72 to 08/03/73

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

Presidential Unit Citation – Vietnam

30 Apr 1972 to 9 Feb 1973

8th WestPac

8th SCS

Vietnam Service Medal with 1 Silver Star (see Note 2) Vietnamese Ceasefire Campaign

May 1972 to Jan 1973

same

Republic of Vietnam Meritorious Unit Citation (Gallantry Cross Medal with Palm)

 

same

Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal

 

same

National Defense Service Medal

Vietnam

Jan 1961 to Aug 1974

same

Service outside the geographical limits of South Vietnam and direct combat support to the Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces for more than six months.

Note 2 — 1 Silver Star = 5 Bronze Stars

The Republic of Vietnam Meritorious Unit Citation (Gallantry Cross Medal), with Palm, was awarded to a unit cited at the Armed Forces level.

Service outside the geographical limits of South Vietnam and direct combat support to the Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces for more than six months.

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

06/03/65 to 08/03/73

AWARD OR CITATION

AIR WING

TAIL

CODE

 “WESTPAC”

Navy Unit Commendation – Vietnam

16 Apr to 4 Nov 1965

7 May to 28 Oct 1971

CVW-2, 5 & 5

 

7th, 8th & 9th

 

 

 

Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal – Vietnam

09 Apr to 11 May 65 *b

20 May to 28 Jun 65 *b

17 to 19 Oct 71 *c

CVW-2, 5 & 5

 

7th, 8th & 9th

 

 

Vietnam Service Medal with 1 Silver Star (see Note 2) - Vietnam Defense Campaign

(Vietnamese Counteroffensive Phase VII – 7th)

Jul to Nov 1965

May to Jun 1971

Jul to Oct 1971

May 1972 to Jan 1973

CVW-2, 5 & 5

 

7th, 8th & 9th

 

 

Republic of Vietnam Meritorious Unit Citation (Gallantry Cross Medal with Palm)

CVW-2, 5 & 5

 

7th, 8th & 9th

 

 

Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal

 

CVW-2, 5 & 5

 

7th, 8th & 9th

 

 

Battle Efficiency Award (Navy "E" Ribbon), marking her as the outstanding carrier in the Pacific Fleet – Ref. 1180B

CVW-2

 

7th

National Defense Service Medal – Vietnam

Jan 1961 to Aug 1974

Jan 1961 to Aug 1974

Jan 1961 to Aug 1974

CVW-2, 5 & 5

 

7th, 8th & 9th

 

 

Presidential Unit Citation – Vietnam

30 Apr 1972 to 9 Feb 1973

CVW-5

 

9th

Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal - Service outside the geographical limits of South Vietnam and direct combat support to the Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces for more than six months.

Note 2 - 1 Silver Star = 5 Bronze Stars

*b = Vietnam (01 JUL 58  to  03 JUL 65)

*c = Korea (01 OCT 66  to  03 JUN 74)

The Republic of Vietnam Meritorious Unit Citation (Gallantry Cross Medal), with Palm, was awarded to a unit cited at the Armed Forces level.

Service outside the geographical limits of South Vietnam and direct combat support to the Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces for more than six months.

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

    USS Midway (CVA-41) remained in cold iron at Alameda until 30 March 1973, when she moved across San Francisco Bay to Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

 

    USS Midway (CVA-41) remained in cold iron at Alameda until 30 March 1973, when she moved across San Francisco Bay to Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

    USS Midway (CVA-41) returned to San Francisco Bay to Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard on 25 June 1973, concluding Overhaul from 30 March to 25 June 1973,  conducting Independent Steaming Exercises off Northern California from 25 to 29 June 1973, conducting Sea Trials from 18 to 19 June 1973, preceded by a "Fast Cruise" at the Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard from 15 to 16 June 1973. During the yard period, Chief of Staff Naval Air Force Pacific Fleet visited Midway on 20 April 1973 and again with Commander Carrier Division One on 1 June 1973. Midway (CVA-41) remained in cold iron at Alameda from 8 to 30 March 1973, when she moved across San Francisco Bay to Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard for overhaul” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

    USS Midway (CVA-41) was homeported at Naval Air Station Alameda, California from 1 January 1973 until 30 June 1973 at which tine the homeport was officially changed to Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan from 30 June 1973 through 31 December 1973 and into the future until relieved” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973)” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

    USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 1 August 1973, for a three day stay, conducting Carrier Qualifications off the coast of Southern California since departure from Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 23 July 1973, inport from 20 to 21 July 1973, conducting Refresher Training off the coast of Southern California from 9 to 20 July 1973, inport NASNI, San Diego, California from 6 to 9 July 1973. Midway departed San Francisco Bay to Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard on 5 July 1973, arriving NASNI, San Diego, California on the 6th” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

    USS Midway (CVA-41) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 15 August 1973, conducting Weapons Training Exercise from 6 to 15 August 1973” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

    “On 16 August 1973, Captain R. J. Schulte, prospective Commanding Officer USS USS Midway (CVA-41), reported on board inport Naval Air Station, Alameda, California” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

    USS Midway (CVA-41) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 27 August 1973, conducting Operational Readiness Exercise (ORE) from 20 to 27 August 1973, while Commander Carrier Group One, RADM Davis, ORE Chief Observer was aboard for its ORE on 21, 24 and 25 August 1973 and commenced preparations for overseas movement” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

    “Commander Carrier Group Three visited USS Midway (CVA-41) at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 29 August and 4 September 1973” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

    “On 7 September 1973, the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy and Commander Naval Air Force Pacific Fleet arrived for the USS Midway (CVA-41) change of command onboard while at at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California. The MCPON presented the Presidential Unit Citation to USS Midway for combat operations in Southeast Asia from 30 April 1972 through 9 February 1973. Following the presentation, Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) on 7 September 1973, relieving Captain Sylvester Robert Foley, Jr., USNA '50, 27th Commanding Officer, serving from July 31, 1972 - September 7, 1973” (Ref. 1178-G & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).   

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(11 September 1973 to 5 October 1973)

(West Coast to Japan Transfer)

 

    On 5 October 1973, USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77), Rear Admiral William R. McClendon, COMNAVAIRPACREP WESTPAC and CDR B. W. Streit, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked and RADM W. R. Flanagan, assuming duties from RADM J. L. Butts, Commander Carrier Division One (1971 to 1972) and CAPT K. L. Shugart, as Chief of Staff, CCD 1 during 1972 to 1973 were most likely aboard arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, ending her HUSS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 11 September 1973, with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, on her home Port Transfer from Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, marking the first forward-deployment of a complete carrier task group in a Japanese port (dependents housed along with the crew in a foreign port), the result of an accord arrived at on 31 August 1972 between the U.S. and Japan, while the move had strategic significance because it facilitated continuous positioning of three carriers in the Far East at a time when the economic situation demanded the reduction of carriers in the fleet. Upon arrival, Commander Naval Forces Japan visited. Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77), Rear Admiral William R. McClendon, COMNAVAIRPACREP WESTPAC, assumed command of Carrier Division Five and Commander Attack Carrier Striking Force, Seventh Fleet, in the Tonkin Gulf in 1973. During his career as a fighter pilot, carrier commander, and Commander of the famed Task Force 77, he served in both the Atlantic and Pacific theaters of World War II, the Korean War, and, lastly, in the Vietnam conflict. Visiting CVA-41 possibly as CTF-77/CCG 5/CTF 70, yet Command History Report for 1973 states Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77). Rear Admiral William R. McClendon and his staff embarked prior to USS Midway (CVA-41) entering its new homeport of Yokosuka, Japan on 5 October 1973. Midway entered Pearl Harbor on 17 September 1973, where the Deputy Commander in Chief and Chief of Staff Pacific Fleet visited Midway. Midway departed Pearl Harbor on 18 September 1973, to perform Mid-Pacific Air Operations, returning to Ford Island on 24 September 1973 and moved to Pearl Harbor on 25 September 1973. Midway departed Pearl Harbor on 26 September 1973, en route to Japan. Midway was overflown on 4 October 1973 by two TU-95 Soviet reconnaissance aircraft while conducting an air wing fly off. The Soviet aircraft were intercepted by Midway fighters at approximately ninety miles and escorted over the ship; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 6th Cruise since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (11 September to 5 October 1973). Not declared a deployment, even though the ship cruised through the Western Pacific and made a foreign port of call since Japan was its new home base and the ship made no other foreign ports of call” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1946, 1952, 1971 & 1973).

https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-72/index_003.htm

 

11/09/73 to 05/10/73

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

National Defense Service Medal

Vietnam

Jan 1961 to Aug 1974

WestPac

Sea of Japaan

West Coast to Japan Transfer

6th Cruise

Ref. 1081 & 1081/C

 

    “Carrier Division 5 became Carrier Group 5 on 30 June 1973, and on 5 October 1973, Carrier Group 5 did not arrive in Yokosuka, Japan aboard USS Midway (CV-41), yet Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77), Rear Admiral William R. McClendon, COMNAVAIRPACREP WESTPAC, assumed command of Carrier Division Five and Commander Attack Carrier Striking Force, Seventh Fleet, in the Tonkin Gulf in 1973. During his career as a fighter pilot, carrier commander, and Commander of the famed Task Force 77, he served in both the Atlantic and Pacific theaters of World War II, the Korean War, and, lastly, in the Vietnam conflict. Visiting CVA-41 possibly as CTF-77/CCG 5/CTF 70, yet Command History Report for 1973 states Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77). Commander Naval Forces Japan visited, marking the first forward deployment of an aircraft carrier. Commander Task Force Seven Seven, RADM MCclendon, and his staff embarked prior to Midway entering port” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973, United States Seventh Fleet; Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & 1093).

 

    “Memorial services were held aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) on 25 October 1973. Fatalities were LTJG EVERETT E. GOODROW, USNR, VA-56, 1ST LT JOT EVE, USMC, and 1ST LT DAVID L. MOODY, USMC, VCMJ-1, DET 101; LT GEORGE A. WILDRIDGE, USN, LTJG WILLIAM J. BATES, USNR and ADJ1 RICHARD H. HALL, USN, HC-1, DET 2” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

    “On 29 October 1973, USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander Task Force Seven Seven, RADM Mcclendon embarking for one day on 21 October 1973 and CDR B. W. Streit, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked returned to Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, in the Western Pacific Region, conducting air operations in the vicinity of Okinawa. On 21 October 1973, Commander Task Force Seven Seven and Staff embarked and later that day CTF-77 and his Staff disembarked via helo. During air operations on 21 October 1973, 6 members of Carrier Air Wing Five were killed in multiple aircraft accidents. An SH-3G helicopter assigned to HC-1 crashes off Midway bow on take-off for an SAR mission in the western Pacific on 22 October 1973. All three crew on board are killed. The helicopter was supposed to get underway to the crash site of two other Midway aircraft that had a mid-air collision. Involved in the mid-air collision were an A-7A (VA-56) and an EA-6A (VMCJ-1). This collision killed all three crew of the aircraft envolved. Memorial services were held aboard Midway on 25 October 1973. Fatalities were LTJG EVERETT E. GOODROW, USNR, VA-56, 1ST LT JOT EVE, USMC, and 1ST LT DAVID L. MOODY, USMC, VCMJ-1, DET 101; LT GEORGE A. WILDRIDGE, USN, LTJG WILLIAM J. BATES, USNR and ADJ1 RICHARD H. HALL, USN, HC-1, DET 2. Commander Carrier Group Seven and his Staff departed Midway on 26 October 1973. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D, VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; VAW-115, E-2B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G (17 to 29 October 1973)” (Ref. 84A & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

    On 22 December 1973, USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77), Rear Admiral William R. McClendon, COMNAVAIRPACREP WESTPAC assigned and CDR B. W. Streit, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her first Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her and second deployment, as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, in the Western Pacific Region, to operate in the Philippines Op area, on her tenth South China Sea. CTF-77.4 Commander not reported. On 30 November 1973, COMSEVENTHFLT paid a brief visit to Midway by helo from the USS Oklahoma City (CG-5). On 1 December 1973, a burial at sea ceremony was held for LT RICHARD L. PIERSON, USN, VA-56, who was killed on a routine training flight on 12 November 1973, while Midway was inport Yokosuka. After training operations near the Philippines, Midway conducted her first Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise performed at “Yankee Station” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the South China Sea from 4 to 8 December 1973. Midway arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point on 10 December 1973, conducting her first Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise performed at “Yankee Station” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the South China Sea from 4 to 8 December 1973. Midway made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point from 10 to 12 December 1973, departing for her forward deployed port of Yokosuka, Japan on the 12th. While in transit, CDR C. W. Roe, USN relieved CDR F. L. Bottenberg, USN as Executive Officer of Midway on 15 December 1973. Midway made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point from 10 to 12 December 1973, departing for her forward deployed port of Yokosuka, Japan. Ports of calls include: Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D, VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; VMCJ-1 Det. 101, EA-6ª; VAW-115, E-2B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. Her fourth deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station,” in the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. Her tenth deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 20th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (26 November to 22 December 1973)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 405 & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

26/11/73 to 22/12/73

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

National Defense Service Medal

Vietnam

Jan 1961 to Aug 1974

10th SCS

20th FWFD

 

 

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

    USS Midway (CVA-41) conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 23 to 31 December 1973” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

    USS Midway (CVA-41) was homeported at Naval Air Station Alameda, California from 1 January 1973 until 30 June 1973 at which tine the homeport was officially changed to Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan from 30 June 1973 through 31 December 1973 and into the future until relieved” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973)” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).  

 

USS MIDWAY (CVA-41) 1973 Special Topics:

 

1.  Operations Department

 

A new AN/WPN-5 Navigational Receiver with data link capabilities for Sin's computer which provides Loran “C' was installed. An AN/SRN-12 Omega navigational phase locked low frequency receiver replaced the AN/SRN--14.  AN/SMQ-6V, a weather satellite receiver and tracker were installed. A recorder (RO-402) was added with infra red and APT (Automatic Picture Transmission) capabilities. The unit tracks three satellites; the ESSA-8, WEFAX and NOAA 11.  AN/WLR-11 a new instantaneous frequency measuring two-band receiver extends the ship's frequency coverage to 18 GHZ and chances of intercept were increased to approximately 100% within Its frequency range. LN-66 a short range (36 mile) navigational radar was added. This provides for more efficient and reliable coastal and harbor navigation. Also added was a quality monitoring set (AN/SSO-65) which furnishes facility controllers (RM's) with a means of analyzing multi-channel broadcast, teletype and audio distortion. This system effectively amplifies trouble-shooting and signal monitoring capabilities. AN-UPR-2(XN-1(V), a radio receiving set which supplies communicators with present ionospheric propagation conditions between our ship and designated shore based transmitting installations was installed.  It heightens the ship's ability to properly select frequencies for most successful transmission in the 2-32 MHZ Range. AN/SPN-44 doppler radar replaced the AN/SPN-12. This unit provides air speed indication of landing aircraft which aids the landing signal officers (LSO).

 

2.  Engineering Department

 

Midway’s boiler fuel system was converted from residual to distillate fuel in June 1973. The bilge pumping system was also modified so that contaminated waste water can be discharged into a holding tank inport instead of into the water. The ship installed twin agent fire fighting systems in all fire-rooms and commenced installation in the remainder of the main engineering spaces and installed survival support Devices (SSD) in all berthing and main engineering spaces. Conversion of the aqueous film forming foam (AFFF) system to improved third-generation equipment was completed and 2MC general announcing systems were installed throughout engineering spaces. Electronic fuel oil tank level indicating systems were installed in all tanks that overflow directly overboard.  Installation of fluorescent lighting in all main engineering spaces was commenced. Midway steaming statistics for 1973 were as follows:

 

Fuel Oil Consumed

20 million gallons

Feed and Fresh Water Made

33 million gallons

Distanced traveled

33,750 shaft miles

Liquid Oxygen made

41,360 gallons

 

3.  Air Department

 

Months

Number of Catapult/Free Deck Launches

Jan – Mar

1,867

Apr – Jun

-0-

Jul – Sep

2,349

Oct – Dec

1,864

TOTAL

6,080

            

Months

Number of Arrested Landings

Jan – Mar

2,259

Apr – Jun

-0-

Jul – Sep

2,401

Oct – Dec

1,883

TOTAL

6,543

 

JP-5 Issued in Gallons

Months

Gallons

Months

Gallons

Jan

3,219,639

Jul

471,393

Feb

1,334,017

Aug

1,771,519

Mar

145,203

Sep

1,024,542

Apr

-0-

Oct

1,195,145

May

-0-

Nov

305,435

Jun

2,382

Dec

1,889,588

TOTAL

 

TOTAL

11,358,863

 

4.  Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD)

 

During 1973, 15,592 aircraft components were processed for repair, 11,709 were returned to supply for issue (RF1) and 3863 were rejected as beyond capability of maintenance (BMC). The ship’s assigned C-1A logged 683.6 flight hours and 453 landings of which 73 were arrested carrier landings. Project “Charger Blue” required AN/APR-25 and AN/APR-27 support to be replaced with avionic support equipment for new AN/ALR-45 and AN/ALR-50 in all CVW-5 aircraft, less SH-3G.  Project “Bee-Line” required the F-4B Aero 1A Avionics Test Benches to be removed and replaced with F-4N Avionics Test Benches. VTAS/SEAMS (Visual Target Acquisition System/Sidewinder Expanded Acquisition Mode) Benches were also added for F-4N support. EKA-3B aircraft avionics and peculiar support equipment were replaced with EA-6A support equipment including AN/APR-25, AN/ASN-66, AN/AP1-103, CP-847A and MF-1 Compass Support. AIMD assumed full support of Attack Carrier Air wing Five by adding a complete inventory of “L” coded ground support equipment previously supplied by the squadron/detachment parent AIMD ashore. Updated Individual Material Readiness List (IMRL) received reported the value of AIMD assigned IMRL Ground Support Equipment (GSE) as $19,385,372.

 

5.  Communications Department

 

Message Traffic Volume

Month

Incoming

Outgoing

Total

Jan

21,545

5,669

27,214

Feb

12,010

3,173

17,183

Mar

4,500 (est)

1,050 (est)

5,550 (est)

Apr

 

 

 

May

 

 

 

June

 

 

 

Jul

5,942

1,932

7,874

Aug

8,215

2,671

10,886

Sep

6,946

2,310

9,256

Oct

13,190

3,589

16,779

Nov

9,693

1,999

11,692

Dec

16,844

4,221

21,065

TOTALS MAR THRU JUN ESTIMATED 4,500 IN, 1,050 OUT.  COMM GUARD HELD BY NAS ALAMEDA AND HPNSY DURING STAND-DOWN AND RAV.

 

Traffic totals increased sharply in October right after inchop SEVENTHFLT and again during December line period. New equipment installed during 1973: AN/WSC-5 Tactical Satellite Comm System, improves communications reliability; AN/UPR-2 (XN-1 (V) Ionospheric Sounder, enables more scientific selection of high frequencies (see Operations Dept entry); AN/SSQ-85 quality control console which enables facilities control operator to monitor quality circuits.

 

6.  Weapons Department

 

The following Ordnance was Expended During 1973:

 

Name

Quantity

Name

Quantity

7162 Small Arms Ammo

4,500

MK83 Live Bombs

28

38 Caliber Ball Ammo

14,650

20mm Live Cartridges

11,160

20mm Live Cartridges

11,160

20mm Target practice

6,170

20mm Target practice

6,170

CBU Cluster Bombs

226

CBU Cluster Bombs

226

MK82 500 LB Bombs

7,484

MK82 500 LB Bombs

7,484

MK83 1000 LB Bombs

185

MK83 1000 LB Bombs

185

Decoy Flares

323

Decoy Flares

323

Signal Illumination Flares

39

Signal Illumination Flares

39

MK45 Parachute Flares

200

MK45 Parachute Flares

200

DST Mine Kit

108

DST Mine Kit

108

Sparrow III Missile

6

Sparrow III Missile

6

Shrike Missile

3

Shrike Missile

3

Sidewinder Missile

5

Sidewinder Missile

5

Walleye Guided Bomb

4

Walleye Guided Bomb

4

MK76 Practice Bomb

3,392

MK76 Practice Bomb

3,392

22 Caliber Small Arms Bullet

30,000

22 Caliber Small Arms Bullet

30,000

45 Ball (Small Arms)

20,400

45 Ball (Small Arms)

20,400

7162mm Ball (Small Arms)

780

7162mm Ball (Small Arms)

780

5”/54 High Capacity Projectile

12

 5”/54 High Capacity Projectile

12

5”/54 Target Projectiles

12

5”/54 Target Projectiles

12

Marine Marker, MK58

34

Marine Marker, MK58

34

White Smoke Grenade

8

White Smoke Grenade

8

Yellow Smoke Grenade

13

Yellow Smoke Grenade

13

Red Smoke Grenade

12

Red Smoke Grenade

12

Distress Signals

24

Distress Signals

24

MK106 Practice Bomb

70

MK106 Practice Bomb

70

MK82 Inert 500 LB Bomb

140

MK82 Inert 500 LB Bomb

140

MK84 Inert 2000 LB Bomb

6

MK84 Inert 2000 LB Bomb

6

MK45 Paraflare

130

MK45 Paraflare

130

MK83 Inert 1000 LB Bomb

11

MK83 Inert 1000 LB Bomb

11

MK83 Live Bombs

28

 

7.  Deck Department

 

Midway accomplished 16 receiving unreps and 7 deliveries during 1973:

 

MIDWAY Rec

MIDWAY Del

AOE-5

DE-3

AF-2

DD-3

AOR-5

DDG-1

AE-1

 

AO-2

 

TAO-1

 

16 – Total

7 - Total

 

8.  Navigation Department

 

Equipment Changes: During the Hunter’s Point Yard period (MAR – APR 73) the Pathfinder Radar on the Bridge was replaced with the new LN-66 Radar and a new Omega (AN/SRN-12) was installed. Prior to departing Conus a Loran C Set was received from the Ticonderoga (CVA-14) and was installed in December 1973.  (See Operations Dept entry also).

 

9.  Supply Department

 

On the 28th of November 1973, S-6 (Aviation Stores) and S-1 (General Stores) Shipping and Receiving were combined into a single operation. On 21 December, the new Walk-in Store opened for business. In September, the policy of placing all laundered Khaki Shirts on clothes hangers was inaugurated. The Hobby Shop was opened in August, and the Clothing and Small Stores was expanded to include foul weather jackets (cold weather type). Also the Sales Division was given a monopoly on coke sales with the proceeds going to the Welfare and Recreation Fund. The Enlisted JUMPS Leave Conversion was put into effect during November. The Wardroom was renovated and improved. A false overhead, False bulkheads, bulletin board/partition combination, and a new speaker system were added. The Wardroom Lounge underwent changes in which chairs and couches were upholstered, overhead replaced and a brass bar that separates the game area was installed. The concept of a mess treasurer/mess caterer was instituted with a Supply Officer as mess treasurer and a line officer as mess caterer. Prior to this change a Supply Officer held both duties.  On 9 September S-7 Division replaced its complement of IBM Keypunches (7) with UNIVAC Keypunches (U-1710, U-1701).  S-2 Division made extensive plans toward renovation of Forward and After Gallies.

 

10.  Medical Department

 

Outpatient Visits

20,992

Inpatient Visits

1,230

Laboratory Tests

13,114

Pulmonary Function Studies

7,630

Audiograms

7,630

ECG’S

230

Pharmacy Units

19,435

X-Ray Film Exposures

6,377

Refractions

689

Spectacles Ordered

1,169

Total Physical Examinations

1,744

Surgical Procedures

75

Total V.D. Cases

796

 

11.  Dental Department

 

During 1973, a total of 7,475 patients were treated. A total of 22,741 Dental procedures were completed on these patients which included restorative treatment, surgery and preventive dentistry.

 

12.  Executive Department

 

There were no major changes in the structure or equipage of the Executive Department in 1973. Between 15 April and the end of refresher training on 26 July the ship had 584 personnel gains and 489 losses, for a turnover percentage of 23.4% (based on a population of 2290) from 27 July until 15 December there were 851 gains and 992 losses, for a turnover percentage of 42.1%. Educational programs aboard Midway were greatly expanded during 1973. Approximately 480 GED (General Educational Development) Tests were given. CLEP (College Level Examination Program) Tests, used by civilian institutions to grant college credits to entering students were also widely administered. Approximately 300 CLEP Tests were given during 1973. A High School Diploma Program, Pre-discharge Education Program (PREP) had 60 students enrolled during 1973. 190 students successfully completed college courses given aboard Midway through the Program Aloat College Education (PACE) Program.

 

CVA-41 1973 Schedule (9 March to 31 December 1973):

 

DATE

LOCATION

DATE

LOCATION

9 - 30 Mar 1973

Cold Iron status at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California

11 Sep 1973

Departed NAS Alameda for West Coast to Yokosuka, Japan Transfer - Home Port Transfer

30 Mar 1973

Commenced Yard Period at Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay

17 Sep 1973

Arrived Pearl Harbor

15 - 16 Jun 1973

"Fast Cruise" at Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay

18 Sep 1973

Departed Pearl Harbor

18 - 19 Jun 1973

Departed Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay for Sea Trials & returned to shipyard

24 Sep 1973

Returned to Ford Island

25 - 29 Jun 1973

Departed Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay to perform Independent Steaming Exercises off Northern California & returned to shipyard

25 Sep 1973

Moved to Pearl Harbor

30 Mar - 25 Jun 1973

Concluding Overhaul at Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay

26 Sep 1973

Departed Pearl Harbor

5 Jul 1973

Departed Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay for NAS, North Island, San Diego, CA

5 Oct 1973

*Arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan)

6 Jul 1973

Arrived NAS, North Island, San Diego, CA

17 Oct 1973

Departed Yokosuka and performed air operations in the vicinity of Okinawa

 

CVA-41 1973 Schedule (9 March to 31 December 1973):

 

DATE

LOCATION

DATE

LOCATION

9 - 20 July 1973

NAS, North Island, San Diego, CA departed for Refresher Training off the coast of Southern California & returned

18 Oct - 25 Nov 1973

Remained at Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan)

 

Departed NAS, North Island, San Diego, CA , for Carrier Qualifications off the coast of Southern California

26 Nov 1973

Ninth “WestPac

1 Aug 1973

Arrived NAS, Alameda, California, for a three day stay

4 - 8 Dec 1973

First Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise performed at “Yankee Station”

At 0830, 4 Aug 1973

"Family Day Cruise", returning to NAS Alameda at 1730 the same day

10 - 12 Dec 1973

Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point

6 - 15 Aug 1973

Departed NAS Alameda for Weapons Training Exercise returning to NAS Alameda

22 Dec 1973

Arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan)

20 - 27 Aug 1973

Operational Readiness Exercise (ORE) returning to NAS Alameda

23 - 31 Dec 1973

conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 23 December 1973 to 28 January 1974

*With Carrier Division Five and Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Attack Carrier Striking Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, RADM McClendon, and his staff embarking prior to Midway entering port, with DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked. Midway with CVW-5 (NF) (11 September 1973 to 5 October 1973).

Ninth “WestPac,her fourth South China Sea deployment and first Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her and first deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. USS Midway (CVA-41) with CVW-5 (NF) (26 November to 22 December 1973).

CVA-41 1973 Schedule during 1972 is located in 1972 YEARS END SUMMARRY and said same during 1973 is located in Third Vietnam Cruise Summary and 8th “WestPac” Summary.

Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973.

 

CVA-41 1973 Sequence of Events, Visitors, Awards and Caualities

(9 March to 31 December 1973):

 

EVENTS, VISITORS, AWARDS AND CASUALITIES

DATE

Events, Visitors, Awards and Caualities during 1972 is located in 1972 YEARS END SUMMARRY and same during 1973 is located in Third Vietnam Cruise Summary and 8th “WestPac”.

1 Jan 72 - 10 Apr 72 -  8 Mar 1973

During the yard period, Chief of Staff Naval Air Force Pacific Fleet visited.

20 Apr 1973

The Material Officer, Naval Air Force Pacific Fleet and Commander Carrier Division One visit.

1 Jun 1973

Midway became the first CVA homeported overseas when her homeport was officially changed to Yokosuka, Japan and Carrier Division 5 became Carrier Group 5 assigned to Midway.

30 Jun 1973

Captain R. J. Schulte, prospective Commanding Officer Midway, reported on board inport Naval Air Station, Alameda, California.

16 Aug 1973

Commander Carrier Group One, RADM Davis, ORE Chief Observer was aboard Midway for its Operational Readiness Exercise.

21Aug  1973

Commander Carrier Group One, RADM Davis, ORE Chief Observer was aboard Midway for its Operational Readiness Exercise.

21, 24 and 25 Aug 1973

Commander Carrier Group Three visited Midway at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California.

29 Aug & 4 Sep 1973

The Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy and Commander Naval Air Force Pacific Fleet arrived for the USS Midway change of command onboard while at at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California. The MCPON presented the Presidential Unit Citation to Midway for combat operations in Southeast Asia from 30 April 1972 through 9 February 1973. Following the presentation, Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard Midway on 7 September 1973, relieving Captain Sylvester Robert Foley, Jr., USNA '50, 27th Commanding Officer, serving from July 31, 1972 - September 7, 1973.

7 Sep 1973

Midway was overflown by two TU-95 Soviet reconnaissance aircraft while conducting an air wing fly off. The Soviet aircraft were intercepted by Midway fighters at approximately ninety miles and escorted over the ship.

4 Oct 1973

Commander Task Force Seven Seven and Staff embarked Midway via helo. During air operations on 21 October 1973, 6 members of Carrier Air Wing Five were killed in multiple aircraft accidents

21 Oct 1973

An SH-3G helicopter assigned to HC-1 crashes off Midway bow on take-off for an SAR mission in the western Pacific. All three crew on board are killed. The helicopter was supposed to get underway to the crash site of two other Midway aircraft that had a mid-air collision. Involved in the mid-air collision were an A-7A (VA-56) and an EA-6A (VMCJ-1). This collision killed all three crew of the aircraft involved

22 Oct 1973

 

CVA-41 1973 Sequence of Events, Visitors, Awards and Caualities

(9 March to 31 December 1973):

 

EVENTS, VISITORS, AWARDS AND CASUALITIES

DATE

Memorial services were held aboard Midway. Fatalities were LTJG EVERETT E. GOODROW, USNR, VA-56, 1ST LT JOT EVE, USMC, and 1ST LT DAVID L. MOODY, USMC, VCMJ-1, DET 101; LT GEORGE A. WILDRIDGE, USN, LTJG WILLIAM J. BATES, USNR and ADJ1 RICHARD H. HALL, USN, HC-1, DET 2.

25 Oct 1973

Commander Carrier Group Seven and his Staff departed Midway.

26 Oct 1973

The Commander in Chief Pacific Fleet and Commander Seventh Fleet visited.

9 Nov 1973

RADM Charles P. Rauch, Assistant Chief of Naval Personnel for Hunan Goals visited.

16 Nov 1973

RADM Ishina, Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force accompanied by, RADM H. B. Rogers, Commander Naval Forces Japan visited.

24 Nov 1973

COMSEVENTHFLT paid a brief visit to Midway by helo from the USS Oklahoma City (CG-5)

30 Nov 1973

A burial at sea ceremony was held for LT RICHARD L. PIERSON, USN, VA-56, who was killed on a routine training flight on 12 November 1973, while Midway was inport Yokosuka.

1 Dec 1973

While in transit, CDR C. W. Roe, USN relieved CDR F. L. Bottenberg, USN as Executive Officer of Midway.

15 Dec 1973

Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973.

 

     “USS Midway (CVA-41) remained at Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 22 to 31 December 1973” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).