CHAPTER XXIX to XXIX, Appendix I to VI

 (11 September to 25 November 1973)

USS Midway (CVA-41) underway in the Gulf of Tonkin during operations off North Vietnam, June 1971 NS0241af  - Robert Hurst.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/0241af.jpg

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw - 24 April 1980

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 1980)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2019)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  of III (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

Book Vol. I of IV            ISBN: TBA                EBook Vol. I of IV

ISBN: 978-1-365-73794-7

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II of III

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III of III

(14 January 2010 to 31

December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

USS Coral Sea CV-42 CVB-43 CVA-43 and CV-43 History and Those Aircraft Carriers Operating with Coral Sea During Her Tour of Service CONSTRUCTION to LAUNCHING and EARLY JET AIRCRAFT DEVELOPMENT (10 July 1944—2 April 1946) and a Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

ISBN: 9781434382917

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 11 September 1973, with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, on her home Port Transfer to Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), marking the first forward-deployment of a complete carrier task group in a Japanese port (dependents housed along with the crew in a foreign port), the result of an accord arrived at on 31 August 1972 between the U.S. and Japan (11 September to 5 October 1973); conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) (6 to 16 October 1973); First deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, in the Western Pacific Region, to perform air operations in the vicinity of Okinawa (17 to 29 October 1973) and conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) (30 October to 25 November 1973). (11 September to 25 November 1973)

CHAPTER XXIX

 

 

      USS Midway (CVA-41) with CDR B. W. Streit, serving as Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked and RADM W. R. Flanagan, assuming duties from RADM J. L. Butts, Commander Carrier Division One (1971 to 1972) and CAPT K. L. Shugart, as Chief of Staff, Commander Carrier Division One during 1972 to 1973 were most likely aboard departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 11 September 1973, with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, on her HUSS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 11 September 1973, with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, on her home Port Transfer to Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), marking the first forward-deployment of a complete carrier task group in a Japanese port (dependents housed along with the crew in a foreign port), the result of an accord arrived at on 31 August 1972 between the U.S. and Japan, while the move had strategic significance because it facilitated continuous positioning of three carriers in the Far East at a time when the economic situation demanded the reduction of carriers in the fleet; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 6th Cruise since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (11 September to 5 October 1973). Not declared a deployment, even though the ship cruised through the Western Pacific and made a foreign port of call since Japan was its new home base and the ship made no other foreign ports of call” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1946, 1952, 1971 & 1973). https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-72/index_003.htm

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(11 September to 5 October 1973)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CVA-41) – 3rd & 7th

Western

Pacific

Region

Pacific Ocean

CVW-5

NF

11 Sep 1973

5 Oct 1973

West Coast  to Japan Transfer

6th Cruise

25-days

West Coast to Yokosuka, Japan Transfer - Home Port Transfer

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas  - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-56

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-93

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber -Tanker

NF500

A-6A

A-6B

KA-6D

VFP-63 Det. 3

Eyes of the Fleet -

Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader  -       Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

600

RF-8G

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

010

E-2B

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

003-007

SH-3G

 

      USS Midway (CVA-41) entered Pearl Harbor on 17 September 1973, where the Deputy Commander in Chief and Chief of Staff Pacific Fleet visited Midway.

 

       USS Midway (CVA-41) departed Pearl Harbor on 18 September 1973, to perform Mid-Pacific Air Operations.

 

       USS Midway (CVA-41) returned to Ford Island on 24 September 1973 and moved to Pearl Harbor on 25 September 1973.

 

       USS Midway (CVA-41) departed Pearl Harbor on 26 September 1973, en route to Japan.

 

       USS Midway (CVA-41) was overflown on 4 October 1973 by two TU-95 Soviet reconnaissance aircraft while conducting an air wing fly off. The Soviet aircraft were intercepted by Midway fighters at approximately ninety miles and escorted over the ship” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

      “On 5 October 1973, USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77), Rear Admiral William R. McClendon, COMNAVAIRPACREP WESTPAC and his staff embarked prior to entering port. CDR B. W. Streit, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked and RADM W. R. Flanagan, assuming duties from RADM J. L. Butts, Commander Carrier Division One (1971 to 1972) and CAPT K. L. Shugart, as Chief of Staff, CCD 1 during 1972 to 1973 could have been aboard arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, ending her HUSS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 11 September 1973, with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, on her home Port Transfer from Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, marking the first forward-deployment of a complete carrier task group in a Japanese port (dependents housed along with the crew in a foreign port), the result of an accord arrived at on 31 August 1972 between the U.S. and Japan, while the move had strategic significance because it facilitated continuous positioning of three carriers in the Far East at a time when the economic situation demanded the reduction of carriers in the fleet. Upon arrival, Commander Naval Forces Japan visited. Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77), Rear Admiral William R. McClendon, COMNAVAIRPACREP WESTPAC, assumed command of Carrier Division Five and Commander Attack Carrier Striking Force, Seventh Fleet, in the Tonkin Gulf in 1973. During his career as a fighter pilot, carrier commander, and Commander of the famed Task Force 77, he served in both the Atlantic and Pacific theaters of World War II, the Korean War, and, lastly, in the Vietnam conflict. Visiting CVA-41 possibly as CTF-77/CCG 5/CTF 70, yet Command History Report for 1973 states Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77). Rear Admiral William R. McClendon and his staff embarked prior to USS Midway (CVA-41) entering its new homeport of Yokosuka, Japan on 5 October 1973. Midway entered Pearl Harbor on 17 September 1973, where the Deputy Commander in Chief and Chief of Staff Pacific Fleet visited Midway. Midway departed Pearl Harbor on 18 September 1973, to perform Mid-Pacific Air Operations, returning to Ford Island on 24 September 1973 and moved to Pearl Harbor on 25 September 1973. Midway departed Pearl Harbor on 26 September 1973, en route to Japan. Midway was overflown on 4 October 1973 by two TU-95 Soviet reconnaissance aircraft while conducting an air wing fly off. The Soviet aircraft were intercepted by Midway fighters at approximately ninety miles and escorted over the ship; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 6th Cruise since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (11 September to 5 October 1973). Not declared a deployment, even though the ship cruised through the Western Pacific and made a foreign port of call since Japan was its new home base and the ship made no other foreign ports of call” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1946, 1952, 1971 & 1973). https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-72/index_003.htm

 

11/09/73 to 05/10/73

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

National Defense Service Medal

Vietnam

Jan 1961 to Aug 1974

WestPac

Sea of Japaan

West Coast to Japan Transfer

6th Cruise

Ref. 1081 & 1081/C

 

      Carrier Division 5 became Carrier Group 5 on 30 June 1973, and on 5 October 1973, Carrier Group 5 did not arrive in Yokosuka, Japan aboard USS Midway (CV-41), yet Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77), Rear Admiral William R. McClendon, COMNAVAIRPACREP WESTPAC, assumed command of Carrier Division Five and Commander Attack Carrier Striking Force, Seventh Fleet, in the Tonkin Gulf in 1973. During his career as a fighter pilot, carrier commander, and Commander of the famed Task Force 77, he served in both the Atlantic and Pacific theaters of World War II, the Korean War, and, lastly, in the Vietnam conflict. Visiting CVA-41 possibly as CTF-77/CCG 5/CTF 70, yet Command History Report for 1973 states Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77). Commander Naval Forces Japan visited, marking the first forward deployment of an aircraft carrier. Commander Task Force Seven Seven, RADM MCclendon, and his staff embarked prior to Midway entering port” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973, United States Seventh Fleet; Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & 1093).

 

      The aircraft carrier homeported in Japan since October 1973 as part of the Forward Deployed Naval Force (FDNF), and rotational Pacific Fleet aircraft carriers from NAS North Island and NAS Alameda, California deploying to the Western Pacific” (Ref. [7] of 1093; Task Force 77 (United States Navy & USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1979). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Task_Force_77_(United_States_Navy).

 

      Commander, Fleet Air Western Pacific (COMFAIRWESTPAC) is a one star admiral who owned NAS Cubi Point, NAF Agana, NAF Atsugi, NAF Misawa, NSF Diego Garcia, and NAF Kadena, with functional wing responsibilities over HC-5, HC-7, VQ-1, VQ-5 and VRC-50” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

NAF ATSUGI

 

     “With the closures of NAS Cubi Point, NAS Agana, NAF Atsugi became the WESTPAC center of naval aviation and the only remaining carrier aviation base in the Pacific. It has supported Carrier Air Wing Five since 1973.

 

      As the AMDO community was standing up in 1968, Naval Air Station Atsugi was standing down. In preparation for its downgrade to an air facility, squadrons VQ-1, VC-5, VRC-50 and HC-7 dispersed to Guam, Cubi Point and California. A permanent VQ-1 det remained.

 

      When NAS Atsugi became NAF Atsugi in July 1971, the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) assumed--and still holds--control of air operations. JMSDF and the U.S. Navy have used Atsugi jointly since then. One area of the base is for exclusive use by the U.S. Navy, one for joint use but administered by the Navy, and one for joint use administered by JMSDF.

 

      When CVW-5 arrived at Atsugi, the local community quickly reached its limit of tolerance for the noise created by carrier landing practice.  Community opposition resulted in a 1973 agreement to move CVW-5 FCLP to Iwo Jima, where it is still conducted. The Japanese government provides funding and C-130 transportation to move people and equipment between Iwo Jima and Atsugi.

 

      Although CVW-5 lives and operates at Atsugi, its I-level support comes from the ship, not from the AIMD located across the street. While in port, the carrier moves most of its engine, weapons and paraloft functions to Atsugi. AIMD Atsugi, which is a helicopter I-level, provides generic support. Everything else goes to Yokosuka to be repaired aboard ship. A forward deployed AIMD supports its airwing whether or not embarked; it never gets a breathing spell.

 

NAF MISAWA

 

      COMFAIRWESTPAC Det Misawa was established in July 1972 to operate a Navy airfield on a section of Misawa Air Base in northern Japan. The det grew in size and scope to meet an increasing tempo of operations. Patrol squadron dets started operating there in 1973 and initial elements for an I-level maintenance facility began providing Navy aircraft maintenance support. The first full patrol squadron arrived in August 1975 for a regular deployment.

 

FIRST MARINE AIRCRAFT WING

 

      Okinawa is home to the First Marine Aircraft Wing (MAW), located at Camp Foster.  First MAW is an element of III Marine Expeditionary Force and has two subordinate commands in WESTPAC, MAG-12 and MAG-36.

 

      MAG-12, located on mainland Japan at MCAS Iwakuni, is comprised of permanent and deployed AV-8B, F/A-18 and EA-6B squadrons, totaling about 40 aircraft.  MAG-36, located on Okinawa at MCAS Futenma, is comprised of permanent and deployed CH-46, CH-53E, AH-1W, UH-1N, and KC-130 squadrons, totaling about 52 aircraft.

 

      MALS-12 and MALS-36, the logistical support elements of the MAGs, also produce Navy engines and provide other Navy support.  MALS-12 assists USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) with F/A-18 and EA-6B component repair. MALS-36 maintains the SE/WSE for P-3 aircraft operating from Kadena Air Base. Marine Wing Liaison Kadena (MWLK) handled this function since the closure of NAF Kadena, until 1998 when MALS-36 assumed responsibility. Its remote work center, Support Equipment Division (SED), repairs yellow gear owned by MALS-12 and NAF Misawa.

 

COMMANDER FLEET ACTIVITIES, OKINAWA

 

      When Okinawa returned to Japanese control in 1972, U.S. Naval Facility Naha and Commander Fleet Activities Ryukyus combined on 15 May to become Commander Fleet Activities, Okinawa (CFAO).  The command moved to Kadena Air Base on 7 May 1975 and became CFAO/NAF Kadena” (Ref. Westpac – Yesterday And Today, By Diane Diekman and Mark Mlikan http://www.amdo.org/Westpac.html).

 

     “USS Midway (CVA-41) conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 6 to 20 October 1973” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

     USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77), Rear Admiral William R. McClendon, COMNAVAIRPACREP WESTPAC embarking for one day on 21 October 1973 and CDR B. W. Streit, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 17 October 1973, with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her first deployment, as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, in the Western Pacific Region, to perform air operations in the vicinity of Okinawa. She will under go her third deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Stationin the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. She will under go her ninth deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington. She will under go her 19th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 84A, USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1946, 1952, 1971 & 1973).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(17 to 29 October 1973)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CVA-41) – 7th (1st Forward Deployed)

Western

Pacific

Region

Pacific Ocean WestPac

Sea of Japan

CVW-5

NF

17 Oct  1973

29 Oct 1973

Training

19th FWFD

13-days

 

Performed air operations in the vicinity of Okinawa.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas  - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-56

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-93

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber -Tanker

NF500

A-6A

A-6B

KA-6D

VFP-63 Det. 3

Eyes of the Fleet -

Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader  -       Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

600

RF-8G

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

010

E-2B

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

003-007

SH-3G

 

       “On 21 October 1973, Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77), Rear Admiral William R. McClendon, COMNAVAIRPACREP WESTPAC and Staff embarked and later that day CTF 77 and his Staff disembarked via helo. During air operations on 21 October 1973, 6 members of Carrier Air Wing Five were killed in multiple aircraft accidents” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

       “An SH-3G helicopter assigned to HC-1 crashes off USS Midway (CVA-41) bow on take-off for an SAR mission in the western Pacific on 22 October 1973. All three crew on board are killed. The helicopter was supposed to get underway to the crash site of two other Midway aircraft that had a mid-air collision. Involved in the mid-air collision were an A-7A (VA-56) and an EA-6A (VMCJ-1). This collision killed all three crew of the aircraft involved” (Ref. 84A).


       “
USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 22 to 23 October 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

       “Memorial services were held aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) on 25 October 1973. Fatalities were LTJG EVERETT E. GOODROW, USNR, VA-56, 1ST LT JOT EVE, USMC, and 1ST LT DAVID L. MOODY, USMC, VCMJ-1, DET 101; LT GEORGE A. WILDRIDGE, USN, LTJG WILLIAM J. BATES, USNR and ADJ1 RICHARD H. HALL, USN, HC-1, DET 2.

 

       Commander Carrier Group Seven and his Staff departed USS Midway (CVA-41) on 26 October 1973” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

     “On 29 October 1973, USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77), Rear Admiral William R. McClendon, COMNAVAIRPACREP WESTPAC embarking for one day on 21 October 1973 and CDR B. W. Streit, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked returned to Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her first deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, in the Western Pacific Region, conducting air operations in the vicinity of Okinawa. On 21 October 1973, Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77), Rear Admiral William R. McClendon, COMNAVAIRPACREP WESTPAC and Staff embarked and later that day CTF 77 and his Staff disembarked via helo. During air operations on 21 October 1973, 6 members of Carrier Air Wing Five were killed in multiple aircraft accidents. An SH-3G helicopter assigned to HC-1 crashes off Midway bow on take-off for an SAR mission in the western Pacific on 22 October 1973. All three crew on board are killed. The helicopter was supposed to get underway to the crash site of two other Midway aircraft that had a mid-air collision. Involved in the mid-air collision were an A-7A (VA-56) and an EA-6A (VMCJ-1). This collision killed all three crew of the aircraft involved. USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 22 to 23 October 1973. Memorial services were held aboard Midway on 25 October 1973. Fatalities were LTJG EVERETT E. GOODROW, USNR, VA-56, 1ST LT JOT EVE, USMC, and 1ST LT DAVID L. MOODY, USMC, VCMJ-1, DET 101; LT GEORGE A. WILDRIDGE, USN, LTJG WILLIAM J. BATES, USNR and ADJ1 RICHARD H. HALL, USN, HC-1, DET 2. Commander Carrier Group Seven and his Staff departed Midway on 26 October 1973. Her third deployment since her second recommission 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her seventh “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her seventh South China Sea, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Stationin the Gulf of Tonkin in the Far East. Her ninth deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon arrival from her World Cruise and first “WestPac” deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet), operational control extending to the 2nd Fleet and Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first South China Sea deployment, for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington. Her 19th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (17 to 29 October 1973)” (Ref. 84A, USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1946, 1952, 1971 & 1973).

 

17/10/73 to 29/10/73

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

National Defense Service Medal

Vietnam

Jan 1961 to Aug 1974

Training

13-days

19th FWFD

Ref. 1081 & 1081/C

 

      “The Commander in Chief Pacific Fleet and Commander Seventh Fleet visited USS Midway (CVA-41) returned on 9 November 1973, RADM Charles P. Rauch, Assistant Chief of Naval Personnel for Hunan Goals on 16 November, and RADM Ishina, Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force accompanied by, RADM H. B. Rogers, Commander Naval Forces Japan on 24 November 1973.

 

       Commander Seventh Fleet visited USS Midway (CVA-41) on 9 November 1973, RADM Charles P. Rauch, Assistant Chief of Naval Personnel for Hunan Goals on 16 November 1973 and RADM Ishina, Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force accompanied by, RADM H. B. Rogers, Commander Naval Forces Japan on 24 November 1973” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

      USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) pulled in for a port of call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 3 November 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

     USS Midway (CVA-41) conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 30 October to 25 November 1973” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973).

 

Fleet Readiness Center Western Pacific

CHAPTER XXIX

Appendix I

 

 

Fleet Readiness Center Western Pacific

 

Mission

 

“To provide ready-for-tasking aircraft and aviation support equipment to U.S. Navy and Marine Corps Pacific Fleet forces, permanently sited in or deployed to Pacific Command (PACOM) and Central Command (CENTCOM) areas of responsibility by providing cost-effective organic and commercial depot-level rework, modification and repair of Naval Aviation weapon systems, support equipment and aeronautical components.


Capabilities

 

FRCWP’s multinational industrial base provides cost-effective, accessible and efficient peacetime support while posturing critical assets, personnel, and capabilities for wartime/mobilization.

FRCWP manages the WESTPAC Aeronautical Component Repair Program supporting the USN supply system. In-theater component repair, accomplished by prime contractors expeditiously return vital supply assets to support forward deployed squadrons. From Guam to the Persian Gulf, FRCWP provides depot support when and where needed.
 

People

 

FRCWP's approximately 200 personnel located at Atsugi, Australia, Korea, Okinawa, Guam and Singapore continue to provide essential aviation depot services to fleet units ashore and afloat from the Northern Pacific westward to the Eastern United States.

 

Facilities

 

Prime contractors NIPPI Corporation, Korean Airlines and Singapore Aerospace Industries accomplish Standard Depot Level Maintenance (SDLM), Integrated Maintenance Concept (IMC) and in-service repairs on all deployed USN/USMC aircraft. FRC WestPac Det. Okinawa performs in-service repairs and provides field teams to support deployed carrier battle groups in WESTPAC and the Indian Ocean. While each stateside Depot normally provides support services for fewer than 10 different Type/Model/Series aircraft, FRC WestPac's global forward-sited presence requires FRCWP to support 20 T/M/S.

 

About FRC WestPac
line

VISION:


World Class Forward Deployed Aviation Depot Maintenance MISSION:
Provide quality, responsive aviation depot-level maintenance for all forward deployed Navy and Marine Corps forces through:

 

•Aircraft scheduled depot maintenance with international commercial partners

•Aircraft In-Service Repair afloat and ashore

•Ground support equipment repair and overhaul

 

PHILOSOPHY:

By providing quality, responsive in-theater depot maintenance, engineering, and logistics, in a manner that demonstrates our commitment to excellence and customer satisfaction, we provide responsive, quality depot maintenance and services delivered on time, at competitive prices, and tailored to our customer's unique requirements. Our multinational industrial base provides cost-effective, accessible, and efficient peacetime support while posturing critical assets, personnel, and capabilities for wartime/ mobilization. We conscientiously establish safe and environmentally sound procedures for the protection of human and environmental health. We establish mutually beneficial long-term relationships with our customers, suppliers, and contractors. From the Mediterranean through the Middle East and Asia to Guam, we provide depot support where and when it’s needed.

 

FRCWP PRODUCTS:


Aircraft Scheduled Depot Maintenance: FRCWP partners with experienced international aerospace maintenance contractors to execute quality scheduled depot maintenance requirements on 12 different Type/Model/Series of aircraft supporting 16 Navy and Marine Corps squadrons throughout WESTPAC. Our international commercial partners include: NIPPI Corporation, and Fuji Heavy Industries, Japan; Korean Airlines, Korea; Aircraft Inspection, Repair & Overhaul Depot (AIROD), Malaysia; and URS Support Services, Guam.

 

Ground Support Equipment (GSE) Repair and Overhaul: Our highly experienced Japanese civilian workforce at our Support Equipment Repair Facility located at NAF Atsugi, Japan, provides quality depot level overhaul and repair of support equipment in support of forward deployed Navy and Marine Corps units throughout the Western Pacific.

 

Aircraft unscheduled depot In-Service Repair (ISR): FRCWP provides rapid, quality ISR by locating experienced depot field teams at major bases in WESTPAC including NAF Atsugi, MCAS Iwakuni, and MCAS Fuentma as well as providing dedicated ISR teams to each deployed carrier strike group. Our depot ISR teams deploy around the world on short notice for rapid response from Guam through Asia and the Middle East to the Mediterranean supporting all Navy and Marine Corps Type/Model/Series Aircraft” (Ref. http://www.navair.navy.mil/napra).

 

Forward Deployed Naval Forces and 37 countries and areas in the

Western Pacific Region

CHAPTER XXIX

Appendix II

 

 

Forward Deployed Naval Forces

 

     “The United States of America is a nation with global interests. We conduct trade with other nations on an unmatched scale as the U.S. imports and exports hundreds of billions of dollars per year in goods and services. Perhaps due to our history as a nation of immigrants, we desire to foster democracy around the world. Those and other interests cannot be acted upon if we do not maintain a strong presence well forward of our borders.

      For a century and a half, the U.S. Navy has maintained a presence in the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean
to promote peace, regional cooperation and stability. That forward presence is maintained by the Forward Deployed Naval Forces (FDNF) of the Navy-Marine Corps team. The concept of forward presence in the U.S. Navy has existed since 1907, when President Roosevelt's Great White Fleet of 16 battleships sailed over 40,000 miles, making twenty port calls on six continents. Today, FDNF operate out of bases and ports around the world, including the Arabian Gulf, Mediterranean, and the Western Pacific, home to the FIFTH, SIXTH, and SEVENTH Fleets, respectively.

     Our presence in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region is more important than ever. U
.S. naval forces help encourage dialogue, promote growth and ensure the free flow of trade, of which the oceans have increased importance. The Indo-Asia-Pacific region is one of the most dynamic areas of our rapidly-changing world, and our fleet must be maintained at a high state of operational, materiel and personnel readiness in order to be flexible and responsive to address a crisis situation requiring military support.

     Forces continuously stationed forward (as FDNF forces are) provide increased operational responsiveness for a crisis, strengthening partnerships with our treaty bound allies and help shape the operational environment during steady
state operations. These units are true "force multipliers" for the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet Commanders” (Ref. Commander, Carrier Strike Group 5 (COMCARSTRKGRU FIVE) - About Task Force 70 and Carrier Strike Group FIVE).

http://www.public.navy.mil/surfor/ccsg5/Pages/ourship.aspx

 

 

There are 37 countries and areas in the Western Pacific Region. These are:

 

American Samoa (USA)

Australia

Brunei Darussalam

Cambodia

China

Cook Islands

Fiji

French Polynesia (France)

Guam (USA)

Hong Kong SAR (China)

Japan

Kiribati

Lao People's Democratic Republic

Macao SAR (China)

Malaysia

 

Marshall Islands

Micronesia, Federated States of

Mongolia

Nauru

New Caledonia (France)

New Zealand

Niue

 

Northern Mariana Islands, Commonwealth of the (USA)

Palau

 

Papua New Guinea

Philippines

 

Pitcairn Islands (UK)

Republic of Korea

Samoa

Singapore

Solomon Islands

Tokelau

Tonga

Tuvalu

Vanuatu

Viet Nam

Wallis and Futuna (France)

 

 

 

 

CTF-70, CTF-75, CTF-77, CDG-5 & CCG-5

CHAPTER XXIX

Appendix III

 

 

Carrier Division Five, formed during the Second World War

Carrier Group FIVE (Carrier Division 5 became Carrier Group 5 on 30 June 1973)
Carrier Strike Group 5, (CSG-5 or CARSTRKGRU 5) (Carrier Group 5 became CSG 5 on 1 October 2004)

Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70)
Surface Combatant Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-75) (
17 January 2014 - The US Navy sends out a notice "establishing Navy Expeditionary Forces Command Pacific" and begins gathering approvals from other type commands.

01 July 2014 - NEFCPAC initial operational capability established.[2]

09 January 2015 - NEFCPAC is officially established.[3] AND 17 January 2014 - The US Navy sends out a notice "establishing Navy Expeditionary Forces Command Pacific" and begins gathering approvals from other type commands.)
Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77)
(In the mid-2000s, CTF-77 was disestablished as a 7th Fleet task force and its responsibilities merged into CTF-70, Commander, Battle Force, U.S. 7th Fleet)

 

References

 

2. "CTF 75 Establishment Ceremony". YouTube. Joint Region Marianas. Retrieved 9 January 2015

 

3. Task Force 75 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Task_Force_75

 

“Carrier Groups are lead by an aircraft carrier and include an airwing and a small contingent of cruisers to act as carrier escorts. When the escort ship contingent is designed to accommodate destroyers as-well-as cruisers, the group is referred to as a Cruiser-Destroyer Group. The Group's mission is to provide centralized planning, control, coordination and integration of assigned assets in support of air, surface, subsurface, strike warfare, space and electronic warfare, amphibious warfare, and mine warfare operations or exercises simultaneously. It exercises Tactical Command of Cruiser-Destroyer, Carrier Air Strike, and Surface Action Groups, and functions as Combined Warfare Commander for the Battle Group and Task Force, and as Naval Component Commander for Combined, Joint, or Allied Forces. The Group operates as a component of, or as the Joint Force Air Component Commander (JFACC) directing tactical air control within a Joint, Unified, or Allied environment” (Ref. Global Security.org - Carrier Group FIVE).

https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/cargru5.htm

 

World War II

 

     “The strike group carries the lineage of Carrier Division 5, formed during the Second World War(Ref. 1093).

 

     On 25 April 1944, Rear Admiral Frank Wagner formed Carrier Division Five when he assumed command aboard USS Wasp and USS Hornet in Pearl Harbor. Rear Admiral J.J. Clark succeeded Wagner and commanded the division through 12 months of sustained combat operations in the Western Pacific and waters surrounding Japan, working for both Third Fleet (ADM William Halsey) and Fifth Fleet (ADM Raymond Spruance). This included participation in the First and Second Philippine Sea Battles and the Iwo Jima and Okinawa campaigns. Task Group 77.4 was at the center of the Battle off Samar in 1944, part of the larger Battle of Leyte Gulf(Ref. [1] of Task Force 77 (CTF-77)).   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Task_Force_77_(United_States_Navy)

 

Korean War

 

     “During the Korean War, Task Force 77 performed a number of combat deployments, where it provided air support and performed interdiction missions as part of the UN forces. Task Force 77 had carrier stations in both the Sea of Japan (East Coast Task Force) and the Yellow Sea (West Coast Task Force, designated Task Force 95), the latter consisting of carriers of the Royal Navy (RN), Royal Australian Navy (RAN), and USN escort carriers due to its proximity to the People's Republic of China. Seventeen USN, one RAN and five RN aircraft carriers served in United Nations carrier operations at some point in time during the Korean War. During the Korean War, Rear Admiral G.R. Henderson, USN, commanded Carrier Division Five (CARDIV FIVE) and served as Commander, Task Force 70 (CTF-70) and Commander, Task Force 77 (CTF-77) aboard USS Princeton (CV-37). Subsequent commanders of CARDIV FIVE moved back and forth between Yokosuka, Japan and the Korean Theater, serving as CTF-70 or CTF-77 on multiple occasions” (Ref. Task Force 77 (CTF-77)). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Task_Force_77_(United_States_Navy)

 

     “During the Korean War, Rear Admiral G. R. Henderson commanded Carrier Division 5 and served as Commander, Task Force (CTF) 70 and 77 aboard USS Princeton (CV-37). Carrier Division 5 moved back and forth between Yokosuka, Japan and the Korean Theater, serving as CTF-70 or 77 on multiple occasions.

 

     Throughout the Korean War, the United States Navy provided substantial assistance to land operations. Planes from carriers gave air support to combat operations and destroyed factories, power stations, supply trains, and other targets. Commander Carrier Division I (Rear Admiral E. C. Ewen), Commander Fast Carrier Task Force (CTF-77), was engaed in operations during the Korean Campaign (25 June 1950 to 19 January 1951). Task Force 77 systematically destroyed hundreds of bridges in North Korea. Operations included close air support, which was marred by communications problems. By mid-September 1950, three U.S. Navy Essex-class aircraft carriers were available for Korean War operations.

 

     The Essex class carriers of Task Force 77 tended to stay off eastern Korea, where there was more sea room. Eight foreign nations deployed more than 100 naval vessels to Korean waters, including carriers, destroyers, cruisers, frigates, landing ships, tankers and other utility craft. Foreign naval vessels were assigned by U.S. commanders to Task Force 77, the carrier strike force; Task Force 95, the blockading and escort force; Task Force 90, the amphibious landing force; and Task Force 96, the logistical support force” (Ref. Global Security.org - Carrier Group FIVE). https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/cargru5.htm

 

     “On 1 August 1955, Carrier Division 5 comprised Essex (Bremerton), Kearsarge, and Shangri-La (both homeported in San Diego)” (Ref. [5] of 1093).

 

Cold War (pre-Vietnam)

 

     “Between conflicts, Task Force 77 was held in readiness for supporting French operations during the siege of Dien Bien Phu in 1954, and off Formosa (now Taiwan) during the several Quemoy-Matsu Crises” (Ref. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Task_Force_77_(United_States_Navy).

 

     “On 1 August 1955, Carrier Division 5 comprised Essex (Bremerton), and Kearsage, and Shangri-La (both homeported in San Diego)” (Ref. [3] of 1093).

 

“Until 1964 command of Task Force 77 rotated between the deployed carrier division commanders; from 1964 Carrier Group Five was permanent deployed to the Western Pacific as CTF 77, homeported at Naval Air Station Cubi Point in the Philippines” (Ref. [4] of 1093).

 

About Forward Deployed Naval Forces

 

     “Beginning in 1964 Carrier Group Five was permanently deployed to the Western Pacific and dual-hatted CTF 70/77, homeported at Naval Air Station Cubi Point in the Philippines” (Ref. [6] of 1093).

 

     “The United States of America is a nation with global interests. We conduct trade with other nations on an unmatched scale as the U.S. imports and exports hundreds of billions of dollars per year in goods and services. Perhaps due to our history as a nation of immigrants, we desire to foster democracy around the world. Those and other interests cannot be acted upon if we do not maintain a strong presence well forward of our borders.

 

     For a century and a half, the U.S. Navy has maintained a presence in the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean to promote peace, regional cooperation and stability. That forward presence is maintained by the Forward Deployed Naval Forces (FDNF) of the Navy-Marine Corps team. The concept of forward presence in the U.S. Navy has existed since 1907, when President Roosevelt's Great White Fleet of 16 battleships sailed over 40,000 miles, making twenty port calls on six continents. Today, FDNF operate out of bases and ports around the world, including the Arabian Gulf, Mediterranean, and the Western Pacific, home to the FIFTH, SIXTH, and SEVENTH Fleets, respectively.


     Our presence in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region is more important than ever. U.S. naval forces help encourage dialogue, promote growth and ensure the free flow of trade, of which the oceans have increased importance. The Indo-Asia-Pacific region is one of the most dynamic areas of our rapidly-changing world, and our fleet must be maintained at a high state of operational, materiel and personnel readiness in order to be flexible and responsive to address a crisis situation requiring military support. Forces continuously stationed forward (as FDNF forces are) provide increased operational responsiveness for a crisis, strengthening partnerships
with our treaty bound allies and help shape the operational environment during steady state operations. These units are true "force multipliers" for the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet Commanders” (Ref. Commander, Carrier Strike Group 5 (COMCARSTRKGRU FIVE) - About Task Force 70 and Carrier Strike Group IVE).http://www.public.navy.mil/surfor/ccsg5/Pages/ourship.aspx

 

     “Until 1964 command of Task Force 77 rotated between the deployed carrier division commanders; from 1964 Carrier Group Five was permanent deployed to the Western Pacific as CTF 77, homeported at Naval Air Station Cubi Point in the Philippines” (Ref. [4] of 1093).

 

     “It also conducted limited operations over Laos in 1962 and 1964 before the commitment of U.S. combat forces to the Vietnam War. Prior to the Vietnam War, the location of COMCARDIV FIVE moved between several Pacific ports and utilized rotating Pacific Fleet aircraft carriers from the West coast of the U.S. as its flagship” (Ref. 1093).

 

     “Prior to the Vietnam War, the location of Carrier Division 5 moved between several Pacific ports and utilized rotating carriers from the West coast of the U.S. as its flagship” (Ref. 1093). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrier_Strike_Group_Five

 

Vietnam War

 

     “As the U.S. Navy entered heavy combat in Southeast Asia between 1965 and 1968, a chain of command evolved which reflected the complex character of the war. In theory, Commander in Chief, Pacific was the commander of all American forces in Asia, including those assigned to Commander, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (COMUSMACV). The U.S. Pacific Fleet was the naval component of the Pacific Command and as such directed the Navy's activities in that ocean. Subordinate to Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT) was Commander, U.S. Seventh Fleet, who conducted those naval operations in Southeast Asia primarily external to South Vietnam. The fleet's Attack Carrier Striking Force (Task Force 77) mounted from the South China Sea the aerial interdiction campaign in Laos and North Vietnam, while Seventh Fleet's cruiser and destroyer units hunted the enemy's logistic craft along the North Vietnamese coast, bombarded targets ashore, and provided naval gunfire support to allied forces in South Vietnam” (Ref. [2] of Task Force 77 (United States Navy & Global Security.org - Carrier Group FIVE). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Task_Force_77_(United_States_Navy)

https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/cargru5.htm

 

     “During the Vietnam War, twelve different commanders led CARDIV FIVE and CTF 77 in numerous combat deployments to the Vietnam War zone. Beginning in 1964, COMCARDIV FIVE was permanently deployed to the Western Pacific and dual-hatted CTF 70/CTF 77, homeported at Naval Air Station Cubi Point in the Philippines. During the Vietnam War, Task Force 77 conducted carrier strike operations from the Gulf of Tonkin and South China Sea for nine years, from 1964 to 1973. Twenty-one of the Navy's 23 operational carriers made at least one cruise with the Task Force and served over 9,100 days on the line” (Ref. Task Force 77 (United States Navy); Global Security.org - Carrier Group FIVE) & [2] of Task Force 77 (United States Navy).

https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/cargru5.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Task_Force_77_(United_States_Navy)

 

     “During the Vietnam War, Task Force 75 was the Surface Combatant Force assigned to Seventh Fleet responsible for the cruisers and destroyers that were not assigned as escorts to aircraft carriers. Rear Admiral Rembrandt C. Robinson, U.S. Navy, at age 47, was Commander Cruiser Destroyer Flotilla Eleven and Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group Vietnam, Seventh Fleet (CTF 75). Admiral Robinson was killed in a helicopter crash in the Gulf of Tonkin on May 8, 1972, during a late night landing approach to his flagship, the guided missile light cruiser USS Providence (CLG-6). The Seventh Fleet's flagship used to be frequently a cruiser. This cruiser, for example USS Oklahoma City (CG-5), would be assigned the designation of Task Group 70.1 when acting as fleet flagship and also act as part of Task Force 75 when carrying out Naval gunfire support” (Ref. [1] of Task Force 75).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Task_Force_75

 

· 17 January 2014 - The US Navy sends out a notice "establishing Navy Expeditionary Forces Command Pacific" and begins gathering approvals from other type commands.

· 01 July 2014 - NEFCPAC initial operational capability established.[2]

09 January 2015 - NEFCPAC is officially established.[3]

 

     “From the South China Sea, the Seventh Fleet's Attack Carrier Strike Force mounted the Rolling Thunder bombing and Blue Tree tactical reconnaissance operations in North Vietnam; the Barrel Roll, Steel Tiger, and Tiger Hound bombing and Yankee Team reconnaissance efforts in Laos; and the ground support mission in South Vietnam. Except during the period in 1965 and 1966, when the aircraft carrier supporting operations in the South sailed at Dixie Station, the carrier task force was deployed at Yankee Station (after April 1966 at 17°30'N 108°30'E). Generally, before August 1966, two or three carriers operated in Task Force 77, and after that date the number was often three or four. During the Easter Offensive 1972 Five and Six carriers operated in Task Force 77. On each ship, a carrier air wing controlled 70 to 100 aircraft, usually grouped in two fighter and three attack squadrons, a reconnaissance attack squadron, an airborne early warning squadron, and smaller detachments. However, the number depended on the size and class of the carriers, which varied from the large-deck 65,000-ton Forrestal class and 70,000 Kitty Hawk class and Enterprise-class ships, to the modified 27,000-ton, World War II vintage Essex-class ships” (Ref. [2] & [3] of Task Force 77 (United States Navy).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Task_Force_77_(United_States_Navy)

 

     “The nickname "Tonkin Gulf Yacht Club" came to be associated with US carrier operations off Vietnam. Rolling Thunder air strikes, armed reconnaissance, and photo reconnaissance missions were conducted against selected targets and lines of communication (LOC) in North Vietnam, while operational procedures were developed by the operating units, 7th Air Force and Carrier Task Force 77, that permitted the full range of coordination for all air operations in the Rolling Thunder program” (Ref. & Global Security.org - Carrier Group FIVE)” (Ref. & Global Security.org - Carrier Group FIVE); Task Force 77 (United States Navy & Global Security.org - Carrier Group FIVE 7 & [2] of Task Force 77 (United States Navy).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Task_Force_77_(United_States_Navy)

https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/cargru5.htm

 

     “In December 1971, Commander Carrier Division 5, Rear Admiral Damon W. Cooper, led Task Force 74 aboard USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) to the Indian Ocean following the outbreak of the Indo-Pakistani War of 1971 (Ref. [5] & [7] of 1093).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrier_Strike_Group_Five

 

THIS IS NOT CORRECT

    
Carrier Division 5 became Carrier Group 5 on 30 June 1973, and in October, Carrier Group 5 arrived in Yokosuka, Japan aboard USS Midway (CV-41) marking the first forward deployment of a complete Carrier Battle Group in a Japanese port (the associated Air Wing, CVW-5, moved into Atsugi, Japan this same year). On 1 January 1974, still homeported at Cubi Point, the group was responsible for three carriers: 63 and 64 both homeported at San Diego and USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) homeported at Alameda.[8] Carrier Group Five shifted its forward deployed location from Cubi Point, Republic of Philippines to Yokosuka in mid-1991. Midway remained in Yokosuka for 18 years and was relieved by Independence (CV 62) on 11 September 1991” (Ref. United States Seventh Fleet; Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization).

 

CORRECT

 

     “Carrier Division 5 became Carrier Group 5 on 30 June 1973, and on 5 October 1973, Carrier Group 5 did not arrive in Yokosuka, Japan aboard USS Midway (CV-41) and Commander Naval Forces Japan visited, marking the first forward deployment of an aircraft carrier commanded by RADM McClendon, Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77), serving from 5 October 1973 to June 1974 presumably. Commander Task Force Seven Seven, RADM MCclendon, and his staff embarked prior to Midway entering port. RADM Coogan, COMCARGRU-3 arrived aboard Midway on 29 June 1974 and assumed the duties of Commander, Task Group CTG-77.4 (the associated Air Wing, CVW-5, moved into Atsugi, Japan this same year)” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973 & United States Seventh Fleet; Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization).

 

NOT TOTALLY CORRECT

Cold War (post-Vietnam)


    
In the post-Vietnam era, Carrier Division Five became Carrier Group Five (CARGRU FIVE) on 30 June 1973 and CTF 77 returned to its Cold War deterrence functions as Commander, Carrier Strike Force 7th Fleet in the Western Pacific, multi-hatted as Commander, Carrier Group FIVE (COMCARGRU FIVE) and Commander, Task Force 70 (CTF 70), the latter task force also being known as Battle Force 7th Fleet.[2] COMCARGRU FIVE was homeported at Cubi Point in the Philippines. In this capacity, CTF 77 alternated embarkation as the Flag Staff aboard Midway, the aircraft carrier homeported in Japan since October 1973 as part of the Forward Deployed Naval Force (FDNF), and rotational Pacific Fleet aircraft carriers from NAS North Island and NAS Alameda, California deploying to the Western Pacific” (Ref. United States Seventh Fleet; Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization).

 

THIS IS MORE CORECT

 

Cold War (post-Vietnam)                

 

     “In the post-Vietnam era, Carrier Division Five became Carrier Group Five (CARGRU FIVE) on 30 June 1973 and CTF 77 returned to its Cold War deterrence functions as Commander, Carrier Strike Force 7th Fleet in the Western Pacific. The multi-hatted commands of Commander, Carrier Group FIVE (COMCARGRU FIVE) and Commander, Task Force 70 (CTF 70), the latter task force also being known as Battle Force 7th Fleet was formed during USS Nimitz (CVN-68) 1979/80 “WestPac’.[2] COMCARGRU FIVE/CTF 70 was homeported at Cubi Point in the Philippines. CTF 77 embarkation as the Flag Staff aboard USS Midway (CV-41) began on 5 October 1973 and was not dual hatted with CCG 5/CTF 70 until Rear Admiral HARDISTY, Commander Task Force Seventy/Seventy-Seven (CTF 70/77) title was disclosed on 29 March 1982 when Major General R. E. MESSERLI, USAF, CINCPAC Deputy Chief of Staff and Inspector General was the guest of Rear Admiral HARDISTY, as reported in the USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1982 and is based on Battle Force U. S. Seventh Fleet, Carrier Strike Force U. S. Seventh Fleet, becoming CTF 77/CCG 5/CTF 70, beginning with presumbally RADM R. E. Kirksey, also the Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet or Battle Force 7th Fleet since October 1979, having assumed COMCARGRU FIVE/ Commander Strike Forces U.S. 7 Fleet (CTF 70) in August 1979 (11 June to 12 July 1979). This command assumption in October of Seventh Fleet Battle Force apears to be CTF 70 as well, yet Carrier Battle Force, Seventh Fleet (CTF 77), has been reported as being formed to create CTF 70/CCG 5/CTF 70 during USS Nimitz (CVN-68) 1979/80 “WestPac”. USS Midway (CV-41) was homeported in Japan from 5 October 1973 to 22 August 1991 as part of the Forward Deployed Naval Force (FDNF), and rotational Pacific Fleet aircraft carriers from NAS North Island and NAS Alameda, California deploying to the Western Pacific” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1979/80/81/82 & United States Seventh Fleet; Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization).

 

     “If Commander, Carrier Group FIVE (COMCARGRU FIVE) and Commander, Task Force 70 (CTF 70), the latter task force also being known as Battle Force 7th Fleet[2], during the Vietnam War, never showed up on USS Midway (CV-41) until 1 June 1980, then CTF 77 was a separate command and its commanders served independent of COMCARGRUP FIVE at least until between 11 June to 12 July 1979 when RADM R. E. Kirksey, COMCARGRU FIVE, CTF 70 becomes the first embarkation in CV-41, shifting his Flag from Subic By, Philippines to CV-41 at sea at the time, serving as Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet, Commander, Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet. CTF 70 would have had to relieve CTF 77 in order to be CTF 77/CCG 5/CTF 70 as commonly reported but there is no mention of CTF 77/CCG 5/CTF 70 in the Command History Reports during 1979 and 1980, but in October 1979 RADM R. E. Kirksey assumed command of the Seventh Fleet Battle Force or Battle Force 7th Fleet. RADM R. E. Kirksey, COMCARGRU THREE was assigned duty using USS Midway (CV-41) as his Flag ship from 11 April to 11 June 1979 and the Cruise Book Photos show his titles and narrative states assuming COMCARGRU FIVE/CTF 70 in August 1979, yet Command History Report of 1979 states “As the in-port drew to a close, CCG-5, CTF SEVENTY, RADM Kirksey and his staff, embarked Midway on 12 July 1979, so on 11 June to 12 July 1980 RADM R. E. Kirksey becomes CCG 5/CTF 70 and in the 1979 Command History Report, RADM R. E. Kirksey assumed command of the Seventh Fleet Battle Force or Battle Force 7th Fleet (CTF 77) in October 1979, Midway and CVW-5 observed their sixth year anniversary as the only forward-deployed CV/AIR WING” (Ref. 1978 to 1979 Cruise Book Command and Staff & 1979 to 1980 Cruise Book - Command and Staff - https://www.navysite.de; USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1979/80/81/82 & United States Seventh Fleet; Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization).

https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-78/index_002.htm

https://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv41-80/index.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Seventh_Fleet

 

     “Beginning in late 1979, CTF 77 also focused on the carrier presence on Gonzo Station in the Indian Ocean and the Gulf of Oman off of Iran following the Iranian Revolution and the subsequent Iran Hostage Crisis involving the detention of the American Embassy staff in Teheran from November 1979 to January 1981. With the release of the American hostages in 1981, carrier presence off Gonzo Station decreased and CTF 77/CCG-5/CTF 70 returned again to its deterrence posture, primarily as it pertained to Soviet Navy operations in the Western Pacific. CTF 77/CCG-5/CTF 70 operated two and three Carrier Battle Groups from the North Arabian Sea to the North Sea of Japan and the North Pacific Ocean” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1979/80/81/82 & United States Seventh Fleet; Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization).

 

     “On 1 January 1974, still homeported at Cubi Point, was responsible for three carriers: USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) and USS Constellation (CVA-64) both homeported at San Diego and USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) homeported at Alameda(Ref. [6] of 1093).

 

     “Carrier Division 5 became Carrier Group 5 on 30 June 1973, and in October, Carrier Group 5 did not arrive in Yokosuka, Japan aboard USS Midway marking the first forward deployment of an aircraft carrier commanded by RADM McClendon, Commander Task Force Seven Seven (CTF 77), serving from 5 October 1973 to June 1974 presumably and RADM Coogan, COMCARGRU-3 arrived aboard Midway on 29 June 1974 and assumed the duties of Commander, Task Group CTG-77.4. (the associated Air Wing, CVW-5, moved into Atsugi, Japan this same year). On 1 January 1974, still homeported at Cubi Point, the group was responsible for three carriers: 63 and 64 both homeported at San Diego and USS Enterprise (CVAN-65) homeported at Alameda.[8] Carrier Group Five shifted its forward deployed location from Cubi Point, Republic of Philippines to Yokosuka in mid-1991. Midway remained in Yokosuka for 18 years and was relieved by USS Independence (CV 62) on 11 September 1991(Ref. 1093).

 

Iran Hostage Crisis                                                                                            

 

     “Beginning in late 1979, CTF-77 also focused on the carrier presence on Gonzo Station in the Indian Ocean and the Gulf of Oman off of Iran following the Iranian Revolution and the subsequent Iran Hostage Crisis involving the detention of the American Embassy staff in Teheran from November 1979 to January 1981. With the release of the American hostages in 1981, carrier presence off Gonzo Station decreased and CTF-77/CCG-5/CTF-70 returned again to its deterrence posture, primarily as it pertained to Soviet Navy operations in the Western Pacific” (Ref. Task Force 77 (United States Navy).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Task_Force_77_(United_States_Navy)

 

First Gulf War (Operations Desert Shield / Desert Storm)

 

     “In the leadup to the Gulf War, Rear Admiral Daniel P. March, Commander, Carrier Group Five, became commander, Task Force 154 (Battle Force Zulu), part of Naval Forces Central Command. The Task Force directed four carriers (USS Midway (CV-41), USS Ranger (CV-61), USS America (CV-66), and USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71)) in the Arabian Sea/Persian Gulf during Operation Desert Storm (Ref. [7] of 1093).

 

     “On 2 August 1990, Iraq invaded neighboring Kuwait and U.S. military forces moved into Saudi Arabia as part of Operation Desert Shield to protect that country against invasion by Iraq. On 1 November 1990, CTF 77, embarked aboard USS Midway (CV-41), assumed the duties of the multi- aircraft carrier Battle Force Zulu on station in the North Arabian Sea. On 15 November, CTF 77 held oversight of Operation Imminent Thunder, an eight-day combined amphibious landing exercise in northeastern Saudi Arabia which involved about 1,000 U.S. Marines, sixteen warships, and more than 1,100 aircraft. Meanwhile, the United Nations set an ultimatum deadline of 15 January 1991 for Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait.

 

      Operation Desert Storm commenced the next day, with the U.S. Navy launching 228 combat aircraft sorties from USS Midway (CV-41) and USS Ranger (CV-61), in the Persian Gulf, from nd USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) en route to the Gulf, and from USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), USS Saratoga (CV-60), and USS America (CV-66) in the Red Sea. In addition, the Navy launched more than 100 Tomahawk missiles from nine ships in the Mediterranean Sea, the Red Sea, and the Persian Gulf. Desert Storm officially ended 27 February, and Midway departed the Persian Gulf on 11 March 1991, disembarking CTFN 77 in the Philippines as it returned to Yokosuka, Japan” (Ref. 1093). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Task_Force_77_(United_States_Navy)

 

     “Carrier Group Five shifted its forward deployed location from Cubi Point, Republic of Philippines to Yokosuka in mid-1991. Midway remained in Yokosuka for 18 years and was relieved by USS Independence (CV-62) on 11 September 1991” (Ref. USS MIDWAY Command History for Calendar Year 1973/80).

 

Carrier Division Five, Carrier Group FIVE, CSG-5 or CARSTRKGRU 5

 

References

 

1. "The Carrier Strike Group". Navy Data. U.S. Navy. 2011. Retrieved 01/01/11 and 02/12/17. http://www.navy.mil/navydata/ships/carriers/powerhouse/cvbg.asp

 

2. Commander, Carrier Strike Group 5 (COMCARSTRKGRU FIVE)

​Battle Force, U.S. 7th Fleet Commander, Task Force (CTF) 70. Retrieved 02/12/17. Global Security.org http://www.ccsg5.navy.mil

http://www.public.navy.mil/surfor/ccsg5/Pages/default.aspx

 

3. NAO 1955, 19 Retrieved 02/12/17.

 

4. USS Midway Cruise Book 1987, 18. Retrieved 2012-05-01 and 02/12/17.

http://www.e-yearbook.com/yearbooks/Midway_CV_41_Cruise_Book/1987/Page_18.html

 

5. http://www.history.navy.mil/shiphist/e/cvn-65/1971.pdf

 

6. NAO 1 January 1974, 163, 172 Retrieved 02/12/17.

 

7. USS Mobile Bay Command History 1991-94. Retrieved 2012-05-01 Retrieved 2012-05-01 and 02/12/17. history.navy.mil

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrier_Strike_Group_Five

 

CTF-77 References

 

1 Morison, Samuel Eliot (2004 (reissue)). Leyte, June 1944 – January 1945, vol. 5 of History of United States Naval Operations in World War II. Champaign, Illinois, U.S.A.: University of Illinois Press; Reprint edition. ISBN 0-252-07063-1.

https://ipfs.io/ipfs/QmXoypizjW3WknFiJnKLwHCnL72vedxjQkDDP1mXWo6uco/wiki/History_of_United_States_Naval_Operations_in_World_War_II.html

 

2. Commander, Carrier Strike Group 5 (COMCARSTRKGRU FIVE)

​Battle Force, U.S. 7th Fleet Commander, Task Force (CTF) 70. Retrieved 02/12/17. Global Security.org

http://www.ccsg5.navy.mil http://www.public.navy.mil/surfor/ccsg5/Pages/default.aspx

https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/cargru5.htm

 

3. Holloway III, James L. (13 May 2014). "Tactical Command and Control of Carrier Operations". history.mavy.mil - History and Heritage Command. Retrieved 6 July 2016. Retrieved 02/12/17.

 

4. U.S. 7th Fleet. Retrieved 02/12/17.  https://web.archive.org/web/20141008124528/http://www.c7f.navy.mil:80/links.htm

 

5. U.S. Navy website - Commander Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet. Retrieved 02/12/17.

https://ipfs.io/ipfs/QmXoypizjW3WknFiJnKLwHCnL72vedxjQkDDP1mXWo6uco/wiki/Task_Force_77_(U.S._Navy).html

 

COMDESRON FIFTEEN

CHAPTER XXIX

Appendix IV

 

 

COMDESRON FIFTEEN

 

Mission

 

“DESRON FIFTEEN is the Navy's only forward deployed Destroyer Squadron and is responsible for the readiness, tactical and administrative responsibilities for seven Arleigh Burke Class Destroyers. The Destroyer Squadron Commodore serves as the Immediate Superior in Command (ISIC) of the ships assigned to the squadron.

DESRON FIFTEEN ships are the principal surface forces of Battle Force Seventh Fleet in the Western Pacific and Indian Oceans

In addition to duties as ISIC for the seven ships assigned to the squadron, the DESRON FIFTEEN staff also deploys with the George Washington Carrier Strike Group (CSG). During these deployments, the Commodore serves
as Sea Combat Commander (SCC) for the CSG. The SCC responsibilities include Surface Warfare Commander (SUWC), Anti Submarine Warfare Commander (ASWC), Maritime Intercept Operations Coordinator (MIO), Mine Warfare Coordinator (MIW), and Submarine Operational Controlling Authority (SOCA) (responsible for coordinating employment of attack submarines assigned to the CSG). DESRON FIFTEEN has additional assignments in the Seventh Fleet as the Maritime Counter - Special Operations Force Commander (MCSOF), Strike Force ASW Commander (SFASWC) and Deputy Ballistic Missile Defense Commander (BMDC).

 

History

 

Destroyer Squadron FIFTEEN was first established in 1920 as a unit of the reserve fleet based at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. Although the squadron was disestablished IN 1922, an Atlantic Destroyer Squadron was re-designated Destroyer Squadron FIFTEEN in 1928. Following patrol and training operations in the Pacific, Destroyer Squadron

 

FIFTEEN was re-designated Destroyer Squadron FIVE in 1931.

 

Following the declaration of war in 1941, Destroyer Squadron FIFTEEN was again commissioned and fought in the battles for North Africa and Sicily. Additionally, the squadron participated in 19 round-trip convoy crossings of the Atlantic during the war. In 1945, the squadron converted to Destroyer Minesweepers (DMS), and was re-designated MINERON 21.


Reactivated in 1946 for service with the Pacific Fleet through 1949, the squadron was briefly disestablished during 1950. However, the squadron was again commissioned for service late in the same year following the outbreak of the Korean War and continues in commission today.

Destroyer Squadron FIFTEEN departed San Diego in 1971 for permanent forward deployment to Yokosuka, Japan as the destroyer squadron component of Battle Force Seventh Fleet. Squadron combatants in service at that time included the destroyers
USS Richard B. Anderson (DD-786), USS Bausell (DD-845), USS Gurke (DD-783), and USS Rowan (DD-405).

 

Destroyer Squadron FIFTEEN ships quickly established an enviable record of service, ranging the Pacific and Indian Oceans and serving off the coasts of many countries in support of national objectives. Squadron operations during the early to mid-1970’s included combat operations off Vietnam and intermittent deployments to the Indian Ocean and Arabian Gulf.

 

In 1975, the older World War II era destroyers of Destroyer Squadron FIFTEEN began to be replaced by newer KNOX Class frigates USS Lockwood (FF-1064), USS Francis Hammond (DE/FF-1067), USS Knox (FF-1052), and USS Kirk was a Knox-class destroyer escort, originally designated as DE-1087 and reclassified as a frigate, FF-1087 (1975). By 1978 this conversion was complete, and in 1980, the guided missile destroyer USS Parsons (DD-949/DDG-33) was replaced by USS Towers (DDG-9).

 

After conversion, Parsons was homeported in San Diego, California, from re-activation until late 1971, when the ship, as part of Destroyer Squadron 15 (DesRon 15), was forward deployed to Yokosuka, Japan. DDG operations ranged from Anti-Aircraft Warfare (AAW) to Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) to Anti-Surface Warfare (SUW) and Naval Gunfire Support (NFGS) and included, as necessary, Electronic Warfare (EW). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Parsons

 

Squadron operations during the late 1970’s and early 1980’s were highlighted by ASW operations, support of contingency operations, and a number of deployments to the Arabian Gulf during the Iranian Hostage Crisis, and later, the Iran-Iraq war. Squadron combatants also participated in exercises with port visits to numerous countries throughout the region. During the 1980’s, the SPRUANCE Class destroyers USS Fife (DD-991), named for Admiral James Fife, Jr. (1897–1975), a distinguished Submarine Force commander during World War II., USS Hewitt (DD-966), named for Admiral H. Kent Hewitt USN (1887–1972), and USS Oldendorf (DD-972), named for Admiral Jesse B. Oldendorf USN as well as the PERRY Class Guided missile frigates USS Curts (FFG-38), named for Admiral Maurice Curts (1898–1976), USS McClusky (FFG-41), named for Rear Admiral C. Wade McClusky (1902–1976). In the Battle of Midway, then-Lieutenant Commander McClusky led USS Enterprise's air group, which sank the Japanese carriers Kaga and Akagi., USS Thach (FFG-43), named for Admiral John Thach, a Naval Aviator during World War II, who invented the Thach Weave dogfighting tactic., and USS Rodney M. Davis (FFG-60), named for Marine Sergeant Rodney M. Davis (1942–1967), who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroism in the Vietnam War. replaced the aging KNOX Class frigates. In 1989, the SPRUANCE Class destroyer USS O'Brien (DD-725), an Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer, was the fourth ship of the United States Navy to be named after Captain Jeremiah O'Brien and his five brothers, Gideon, John, William, Dennis and Joseph, who captured HMS Margaretta on 12 June 1775 during the American Revolution replaced USS Oldendorf (DD-972), named for Admiral Jesse B. Oldendorf USN.

In addition to combat operations during
Operation Desert Storm in 1991, the squadron participated in initial enforcement of the no-fly zone over Iraq during Operation Southern Watch in 1992, the evacuation of the Republic of the Philippines following Mount Pinatubo’s eruption, and many operations and exercises with countries throughout the region.

In the years following, Destroyer Squadron FIFTEEN continued supporting National Interests throughout the Western Pacific and Indian Oceans, and the Arabian Gulf” (Ref.
http://www.desron15.navy.mil).

 

Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) History

1973 to 1991

CHAPTER XXIX

Appendix V

 

 

     “Returning from its final Vietnam combat cruise in March 1973, CVW-5 had only a brief stay in its homeport of San Diego.  Participating in an evolution unique in US aircraft carrier history, the air wing embarked on the Midway on 11 September 1973 to become part of the first carrier/air wing team to be permanently forward deployed overseas. Arriving in Yokosuka Naval Base, Japan on 5 October 1973, CVW-5 and the Midway took up quarters in their new homeport to defend the strategic interests of the United States, while assisting the Japanese Self Defense Forces in defending their homeland.

 

     In the years between 1973 and 1991, USS Midway and CVW-5 made numerous deployments throughout the Western Pacific, South China Sea, Indian Ocean and Northern Pacific to counter the Soviet threat in those areas. One of the most notable deployments occurred in 1984, when CVW-5 completed 111 continuous days on station in the North Arabian Sea, guarding the Strait of Hormuz and guaranteeing the continued flow of vital oil to our allies in Japan and Western Europe. Again in June 1985, USS Midway/CVW-5 steamed into the Indian Ocean to remain on station in the North Arabian Sea. Marking the eighth Indian Ocean deployment for the carrier/air wing team, this 83-day on-station period was completed with a port visit to Perth, Australia.

 

     After its return to Japan on 31 March 1986 from a routine Western Pacific deployment, CVW-5 began a major transformation into a modern carrier air wing employing the very latest combat aircraft technology available. On 25 March 1986, the final carrier launching of a Navy fleet F-4S Phantom II took place off Midway during flight operations in the East China Sea. Members of VF-151 manned the aircraft, marking another CVW-5 milestone. In April 1986, the two squadrons of F-4’s and two squadrons of A-7’s detached from the air wing, never to return. Additionally, four EA-6A Prowlers transited the Pacific to be replaced by updated airframes at Naval Air Station, Whidbey Island, Washington. Despite having five squadrons stateside, in October 1986 CVW-5 participated in an integrated air wing weapons detachment to Naval Air Station, Fallon, Nevada. Using borrowed fleet replacement squadron and fleet aircraft for A-6 and E-2 crew use, the unprecedented Fallon Detachment participation by the restructured air wing resulted in one of the finest air wing NAS Fallon deployments on record.

 

    Three F/A-18 Hornet squadrons and the refurbished EA-6B squadron completed the TRANSPAC back to Japan in November 1986. Almost immediately after returning to Japan, CVW-5 again deployed aboard Midway on a routine Western Pacific deployment. Continuing to deploy to various regions in the Pacific during 1987, in September, CVW-5 was joined by its newest A-6 squadron, the Nighthawks of VA-185.

 

    In November of 1987, the air wing and USS Midway deployed to the North Arabian Sea. During the extended time on station, the CVW-5/Midway team participated in numerous allied exercises before retuning to NAF Atsugi, Japan in April 1988.  From May 1988 to June 1989, CVW-5 deployed aboard the Midway four separate times for a total at sea time in excess of five months. The squadrons participated in nine allied or combined exercises and logged more than 28,000 peacetime flight hours.

 

    Carrier Air Wing FIVE began its final cruise aboard the USS Midway in October 1990 as part of Operation Desert Shield. From November to January 1991, the carrier/air wing team participated in numerous multinational exercises and operated continuously in the Arabian Gulf.  On 17 January 1991, Operation Desert Shield changed to Desert Storm as CVW-5 aircraft launched a night strike deep into Iraq. For the next forty-three days, the air wing flew 3,383 combat sorties and expended over four million pounds of ordinance without the loss of any aircraft or aircrew. CVW-5 and Midway contributed significantly to the liberation of Kuwait while minimizing allied casualties and was awarded the Navy Unit Commendation. In April 1991, the Midway battle group returned to Yokosuka, Japan.

 

    In August 1991, CVW-5 accompanied the USS Midway en route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii for the first ever OFRP[p1]  air wing swap out between the USS Midway and USS Independence (CV-62). With the decommissioning of VA-185 on 30 August 1991 and a new homeport change for VFA-151 to Lemoore, California on 1 September 1991, joining CVW-5 in a new composition were two F-14 (VF-21 and VF-154) and one S-3B (VS-21) squadrons. This new and improved CVW-5 returned to Yokosuka on board USS Independence on 11 September 1991. Returning to the Arabian Gulf in April 1992, the air wing participated in “Operation Southern Watch” and for eighteen days, successfully flew 1,359 combat sorties with over 4,500 flight hours in support of the multinational mission to monitor Iraqi compliance with the United Nations-Established "no-fly zone" below the 32nd parallel. CVW-5 and USS Independence were awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation for their outstanding performance in the establishment of the “Southern Watch” “no fly” ZONE. In October 1992, the Independence returned to Yokosuka and CVW-5 returned to NAF Atsugi”(Ref. Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) History). https://www.cnic.navy.mil/regions/cnrj/installations/naf_atsugi/about/tenant_commands/cvw_5/cvw_5/History.html

 

What is a WestPac or Forward Deployed WestPac

CHAPTER XXIX

Appendix VI

 

 

    Often a Forward Deployed U. S. Aircraft Carrier FWFD is less than a month due to visiting foreign ports of calls and South and East China Sea at sea periods often are not “WestPac’s”, but are FWFD’s.

 

     “WestPac’s” are approximately a six month long deployment for Aircraft Carriers, as well as naval vessels traveling from the U. S. to the Western Pacific. Yet forward deployed Aircraft Carriers operate in the Western Pacific Region for periods less then six months while on Patrol, so referring to these Patrols as “WestPac’s” is confirmed by GO NAVY (http://www.gonavy.jp/index.html)  in their CV deployment charts, beginning with USS Midway (CV-41), former CVA and CVB; USS Independence (CV-62), former CVA-62, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), former CVA-63, USS George Washington (CVN-73) and USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) as of 2019.

 

      For the purpose of counting the number of “WestPac’s” USS Midway (CV/CVA-41) and aircraft carriers that followed, made in the western pacific while forward deployed, at sea periods nearing two months or over are “WestPac’s” and underway periods that include a foreign port of call are considered Foreign Water Fleet Deployment’s (FWFD’s), with the exception of Sasebo, Japan, where munitions are loaded and un loaded by a forward deployed Aircraft carrier.

 

      For Aircraft Carriers traveling from the U. S. while on deployments that visit Sasebo, Japan, the port of call is considered a FWFD as is Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines and Pusan, South Korea. Both these foreign ports of call allowed U. S. Aircraft Carriers since WW II and the Korea War, Subic Bay until 1991, used as a foreign port of call and U. S. Naval Base, as in the casse of Subic Bay, while Pusan South Korea, now Busan, Korea's second largest city continues to allow U. S. Aircraft Carriers to make porto of calls, while Subic Bay no Longer does. Kunsan Air Base, located on the coast of the Yellow Sea in western South Korea falls under the command of the United States Air Force since the end of the Korea War. It is one of only two United States Air Force installations in the Asian peninsula, with the other being found in Osan, nearly 6 hours away. During the Vietnam War, their was no forward deployed agreement for a U. S. Aircraft Carrier with either Republic of Philippines and South Korea, yet U. S. Naval vessels anchored and moored  at Subic Bay and South Korea

 

      In an article published by the U. S. Navy on 28 May 2008, “Rear Adm. Rick Wren, Kitty Hawk Carrier Strike Group commander, highlighted and praised the ship's accomplishments during her time in Yokosuka. "As commander of Battle Force 7th Fleet, I want to thank the men and women of USS Kitty Hawk for their contributions to maritime security in this region," Wren said. Kitty Hawk made 20 deployments in the Western Pacific during that time, taking part in a number of exercises, including: Cobra Gold; Foal Eagle; Malabar; Annual Exercise; Rim of the Pacific; Talisman Saber; and Keen Sword, the largest joint exercise for the Navy and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force.

 

Kitty Hawk Bids Japan Sayonara for the Last Time

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) left Japan for the last time on 28 May 2008, with hundreds of friends, family members and distinguished visitors watching as the ship left the piers where she has operated from for nearly a decade. The Navy's oldest active-duty aircraft carrier left for Pearl Harbor. There she will pass on her responsibilities as the only carrier operating permanently outside of the United States to USS George Washington (CVN-73) later this summer. Thomas Schieffer, the U.S. ambassador to Japan; Hitoshi Kimura, Japan's senior vice-minister of foreign affairs; and Rear Adm. James Kelly, U.S. Naval Forces Japan commander, were among the guests that included local business, civic and military leaders. Rear Adm. Rick Wren, Kitty Hawk Carrier Strike Group commander, highlighted and praised the ship's accomplishments during her time in Yokosuka.


      “As commander of Battle Force 7th Fleet, I want to thank the men and women of
USS Kitty Hawk for their contributions to maritime security in this region," Wren said.

Kitty Hawk made 20 deployments in the Western Pacific during that time, taking part in a number of exercises, including: Cobra Gold; Foal Eagle; Malabar; Annual Exercise; Rim of the Pacific; Talisman Saber; and Keen Sword, the largest joint exercise for the Navy and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force. Wren also thanked the Japanese for their help and cooperation in hosting Kitty Hawk. "I also want to extend my deepest appreciation to the citizens of this wonderful nation ... for their support to the [Forward Deployed Naval Forces] carrier," Wren said.

      Wren and Capt. Todd Zecchin,
Kitty Hawk's commanding officer, then boarded and waved goodbye to the crowd as the ship's crew raised her brow from the quarterdeck and flag on her mast. More than 1,000 Kitty Hawk Sailors 'manned the rails' as the ship pulled out into Truman Bay while the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force's band played "Anchor's Aweigh" from the pier. As the ship pulled away, she released hundreds of red, white and blue balloons. Sailors then formed on the flight deck and spelled out 'sayonara,' which means 'goodbye' in Japanese for a commemorative farewell photograph.

      About 900 Kitty Hawk Sailors and over 100 members of will return to Japan in the embarked Carrier Strike Group 5 and Destroyer Squadron 15 staff members will return to Japan in August on George Washington, as will the 2,000 Sailors of Carrier Air Wing 5, which operates from Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan, when not embarked on the carrier. The remainder of Kitty Hawk's crew will return to the West Coast to decommission the ship in Bremerton, Wash., in early 2009. The ship's pending decommissioning has stirred some nostalgic feelings from the crew. "It's going to be emotional for me, because in my opinion, Kitty Hawk still has a lot of years left," said Chief Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Fuel) Geronimo Crisostomo, who served a total of three tours on Kitty Hawk. "It can still do the job out there."


      During her 10 years in Japan,
Kitty Hawk has proven she can do the job--and make history. On March 22, 2001, Kitty Hawk became the first aircraft carrier to enter Singapore's Changi Naval Base Pier. The first F/A-18F Super Hornet landing on board Kitty Hawk's 4.1-acre flight deck took place Feb. 19, 2004. Kitty Hawk also worked to establish herself as a symbol of goodwill and friendship with the Japanese, making port visits to Otaru and Sasebo. The ship was also the first U.S. Navy aircraft carrier to visit Muroran on the northern island of Hokkaido.

 

      The USS Kitty Hawk Carrier Strike Group is on its spring deployment in the Western Pacific Ocean. The strike group is the U.S. Navy's largest and includes the carrier, seven ships of Destroyer Squadron 15, two Aegis weapons system equipped guided-missile cruisers and Carrier Air Wing 5. The ships operate from Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan, and the air wing operates from Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan. Together, they serve as the 7th Fleet's combatant force” (Ref. Story Number: NNS080530-12 - Release Date: 5/30/2008 1:59:00 PM  - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Carlos Gomez, Kitty Hawk Public Affairs - USS KITTY HAWK, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=37528

 

      Patrols while visiting foreign ports less then one month while may be considered Foreign Water Fleet Deployments by the author of U. S. Aircraft Carrier Deployment History, EQNEEDF, only FWFD’s lasting two months or Langer are considered “WestPacs.”